DEAD BEATS – EP – Mori Calliope / 森カリオペ

Mori Calliope / 森カリオペ - DEAD BEATS - EP  artwork

DEAD BEATS – EP

Mori Calliope / 森カリオペ

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 5.16

Release Date: October 20, 2020

© ℗ 2020 cover corp.

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Beats New $50 Flex Wireless Earphones Arrive Right On Time Following Apple’s iPhone 12 Reveal Event

Beats Announces Its New $  50 Beats Flex Wireless Earphones

Source: Beats / Apple

 

 

Yes, Beats is still dropping earphones despite all signs indicating that Apple is slowly phasing the company out. Beats’ latest offering, the Beats Flex wireless earphones, gives fans of the brand a very affordable option.

Beats By Dre x Sade

Source: Beats By Dre / Beats

Beats unveiling the new $ 50 Beats Flex wireless earbuds come right after Apple announced it would no longer include a pair of earphones or charging cube when the iPhone 12 drops. The Beats Flex is a much-needed update to the wrap around the neck style of wireless earphones first introduced in 2017.

The Beats Flex doesn’t have all of the features that Apple’s AirPods boast. Still, it does definitely deliver a solid listening experience and features the latest technology plus great battery life at a budget price. The Beats Flex feature Apple’s W1 chip which allows for one-touch pairing with your all of your Apple devices, seamless switching between each device, checking battery life and Audio sharing with friends.

Android users will have to download a separate app to enjoy those same features listed above.

Beats Flex

Source: Beats / Apple

As for the design, the Beats Flex is made of durable Nitinol material, and the Flex-Form cable is extremely lightweight and described as ” nearly unnoticeable ” while being worn. The earbuds are magnetic, which allows them to automatically play music when they are in your ears and pause when resting around your neck. Due to everyone’s ears not being the same, the Beats Flex comes with four eartip options that will obtain a personalized, secure fit so you can enjoy an optimal sound and comfortable experience.

Speaking of sound, the Beats Flex offers users rich, balanced sound with outstanding stereo separation thanks to a proprietary layered driver with dual-chamber acoustics. An advanced digital processor helps fine-tunes the sound for precise mids, accurate bass, and low distortion.

Last but certainly least, the Beats Flex promises up to 12-hours of battery life. With the inclusion of a USB-C charging cable, users can enjoy 10-minute Fast Fuel charging and an additional 1.5 hours of playback when the battery is low.

The Beats Flex is available for preorder at Apple.com now and will be available in the Beats Black and Yuzu Yellow color options beginning October 21. Additionally, the Smoke Gray and Flame Blue and will be available sometime in early 2021.

Photo: Beats / Apple

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

JR Smith beats up man for damaging his truck

JR Smith beat up a man who allegedly damaged his truck during protests in Los Angeles, according to video posted by TMZ Sports.
www.espn.com – NBA

Jazz’s Conley beats Bulls’ LaVine for HORSE title

The ability to make shots with both hands was the difference as Jazz point guard Mike Conley beat Bulls guard Zach LaVine to claim the NBA’s first HORSE competition on Thursday.
www.espn.com – NBA

#1 Cool Dance Beats & Hip Hop Drum Loops – Drum Loops Royalty Free Public Domain

Drum Loops Royalty Free Public Domain - #1 Cool Dance Beats & Hip Hop Drum Loops  artwork

#1 Cool Dance Beats & Hip Hop Drum Loops

Drum Loops Royalty Free Public Domain

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: December 17, 2012

© ℗ 2012 Public Domain Royalty Free Music

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Binaural Beats – Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats - Binaural Beats  artwork

Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: May 8, 2012

© ℗ 2011 Brainwave Media

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Team USA beats Turkey in OT, Tatum injured

Free throws were the deciding factor in the United States’ overtime win, as Turkey missed its final four to keep the Americans in the game.
www.espn.com – NBA

Virtual beats: Making music with VR

A music mixing tool allows people to go “inside the mixing desk” using virtual reality, according to its creator from London’s Royal College of Art.


Reuters Video: Entertainment

Find your Soulmate Live webcam chat!

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals – Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Dope Boy's Hip Hop Instrumentals - Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals  artwork

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals

Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: January 22, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Hip Hop Beat Factory LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves – Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment - Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves  artwork

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: April 14, 2011

© ℗ 2011 Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Stormzy beats Taylor Swift to top spot in UK singles charts

Grime artist Stormzy scored his first No. 1 in the UK singles charts on Friday (May 3). Rough Cut (no reporter narration).


Reuters Video: Entertainment

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Nets’ Harris beats Stephen Curry for 3-point title

Brooklyn’s Joe Harris made 12 consecutive shots during the final round to upset Golden State’s Stephen Curry to win the 3-point contest at All-Star Saturday Night.
www.espn.com – TOP
SuperStarTickets

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones – Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment - Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones  artwork

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: June 26, 2012

© ℗ 2011 Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

#1 Cool Dance Beats & Hip Hop Drum Loops – Drum Loops Royalty Free Public Domain

Drum Loops Royalty Free Public Domain - #1 Cool Dance Beats & Hip Hop Drum Loops  artwork

#1 Cool Dance Beats & Hip Hop Drum Loops

Drum Loops Royalty Free Public Domain

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: December 17, 2012

© ℗ 2012 Public Domain Royalty Free Music

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Anna Kendrick Throws Shade At Ryan Reynolds After She Beats Him For Choice Twit At 2018 Teen Choice Awards

In your face Ryan Reynolds!


Access Hollywood Latest News

Binaural Beats – Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats - Binaural Beats  artwork

Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: May 8, 2012

© ℗ 2011 Brainwave Media

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

LeBron saves Cavs, beats Timberwolves at buzzer

LeBron James had a huge block and the winning buzzer-beater as the Cavs topped the Timberwolves for a much-needed victory.
www.espn.com – TOP
SuperStarTickets

BPM (Beats Per Minute) – Robin Campillo

Robin Campillo - BPM (Beats Per Minute)  artwork

BPM (Beats Per Minute)

Robin Campillo

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: October 20, 2017


In Paris in the early 1990s, a group of activists goes to battle for those stricken with HIV/AIDS, taking on sluggish government agencies and major pharmaceutical companies in bold, invasive actions. The organization is ACT UP, and its members, many of them gay and HIV-positive, embrace their mission with a literal life-or-death urgency. Amid rallies, protests, fierce debates and ecstatic dance parties, the newcomer Nathan falls in love with Sean, the group’s radical firebrand, and their passion sparks against the shadow of mortality as the activists fight for a breakthrough.

© © 2017 Les films de Pierre – France 3 Cinéma – Page 114 – Memento Films Production – FD Production

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Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals – Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Dope Boy's Hip Hop Instrumentals - Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals  artwork

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals

Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: January 22, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Hip Hop Beat Factory LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves – Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment - Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves  artwork

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: April 14, 2011

© ℗ 2011 Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves – Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment - Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves  artwork

Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment: Sine Wave Binaural Beat Music With Alpha Waves, Delta, Beta, Gamma, Theta Waves

Binaural Beats Brain Waves Isochronic Tones Brain Wave Entrainment

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: April 14, 2011

© ℗ 2011 Binaural Beats Brainwave Entrainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals – Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Dope Boy's Hip Hop Instrumentals - Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals  artwork

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals

Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: January 22, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Hip Hop Beat Factory LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Utah beats California 30-24, becomes last undefeated Pac-12 team

Utah beats California 30-24, becomes last undefeated Pac-12 team
ESPN.com – TOP
SuperStarTickets

Fetty Wap’s Debut Album Beats Out “What a Time To Be Alive” on Billboard 200

Last week, Drake and Future took the top spot for the Billboard 200 for Albums. However, Fetty Wap took the top spot this week with his self-titled debut, according to Nielson Music. The album has sold more than 129,000 units since its release on September 25th. What a Time to Be Alive followed with 104,000 units sold. Wap is the first hip hop artist in two years to debut #1 on the Billboard 200. The last artist to reach that feat was A$ AP Rocky with Long.Live.A$ AP in 2012. 

 

Filed under: News Tagged: ASAP Rocky, Billboard 200, Drake, Fetty Wap, Future
Hip Hop News, Interviews and Music: Allhiphop.com

A-List Make-up Artist Beats The Crap Out of Robber With His Brushing Hand

An A-list make-up artist known for his Audrey Hepburn eyebrows and clients like Mariah Carey and Jessica Chastain, turned from pretty boy to Batman after a guy tried robbing his pal’s NYC jewelry store. Kristofer Buckle says he was helping his…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Beauty


Black Cop Beats Black Female Suspect On Bus, Riders Beg For Peace [VIDEO]

Although details are scant at the time, a harrowing video depicting a Black Boston police officer beating a female suspect over alleged theft on a bus and then pulling his service weapon has surfaced. Riders on the vehicle pleaded with the officer to put down his gun and did the same when a fellow officer came to intervene with his weapon drawn.

Raw Story reported on the video, which was uploaded by BoomNation Station. While the video was uploaded on Friday (Sept. 18), there is not an official time stamp on the video nor has any local Boston outlet picked up the story to our knowledge.

What we can see is that the unnamed officer is brutally beating the woman and fighting with her, then he draws his gun after she doesn’t comply. From there, the riders began shouting at the officer while others began recording the incident.

More from Raw Story:

In a video posted on YouTube Friday night, the officer can be seen struggling with the woman near the end of the bus –reportedly over a petty theft charge — and quickly drawing his gun as bystanders scrambled to get out of the way.

With multiple witnesses filming the altercation on their cell phones, bystanders can be heard yelling “drop the gun,” “officer, please put down the gun” as the cop can be seen looking back at them and seeing he is being recorded.

After holstering his weapon, the officer continues to attempt to control the woman who flails at him while climbing up on bus seats in an attempt to get away.

Witnesses can heard pleading with her “sister, chill out” and “relax,” saying “we’re here for you.”

This story is developing. We will update when new information is made available. We also wish to stress that we do not know the exact date and time of the video, or if it was footage from this year.

Watch the video of the Boston police officer and the tussle with a female suspect below. A Warning: the video is violent and may be triggering for some.

Photo: YouTube

The post Black Cop Beats Black Female Suspect On Bus, Riders Beg For Peace [VIDEO] appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

Hip-Hop Wired

Box Office: ‘Perfect Guy’ Narrowly Beats ‘The Visit’


It’s the fifth weekend in a row that a movie featuring African-American actors in the leading roles has topped the North American box office.

read more


Hollywood Reporter

Former Beats Music Head Exits Apple Music

Ian Rogers will reportedly be taking a job in Europe in an unrelated industry.
Music News Headlines – Yahoo News

Beats x UNDFTD Presents Travis Scott In “Never Catch Me” [VIDEO]

Just last month, Beats by Dr. Dre and streetwear brand Undefeated collaborated on limited edition Powerbeats2 Wireless in-ear headphones . In honor of the collab, Beats goes behind the scenes as Travis Scott records a new track called “Never Catch Me.” 

Beats by Dre and Undefeated invite you into the mind of Travis Scott. Inspired by the Special Edition Beats x UNDFTD Powerbeats2 Wireless, this film takes you to a place of determination and raw emotion. A place where despite the hardships of your past, one can still be victorious in their future. Watch Travis Scott take success into his own hands in this exclusive Beats studio session “Never Catch Me.”

Watch below. Travis Scott’s new album, Rodeo, is out in September.

Photo: YouTube

The post Beats x UNDFTD Presents Travis Scott In “Never Catch Me” [VIDEO] appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

Hip-Hop Wired

Electronic beats and art in St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg Street Art museum hosts an international festival of contemporary art and electronic music. Sharon Reich reports.


Reuters Video: Entertainment

Find your Soulmate Live webcam chat!

Drake Announces OVO Sound Beats 1 Radio Show On Apple Music

UPDATE: Drake joins Dr. Dre and Jaden Smith as a celebrity host on Beats 1 Radio.


HipHopDX News

Drake Drops ‘Energy’ Video And Announces ‘OVOSOUND Radio’ On Beats 1

During Zane Lowe’s show on Beats 1 this morning Drake announced the premiere of his new music video for “Energy”. Drake says about the video, “It’s shocking, it’s beautiful, it’s a lot of things…”  You can view the music video for “Energy” in its entirety now exclusively on Apple Connect.


Later in the interview, Drake announced that “OVOSOUND Radio” his very own Beats 1 Radio show will air tomorrow 7/11/15 at 3PM PST on Beats 1.
Visit www.Beats1Radio.com for the Beats 1 program schedule.

Filed under: Trending, Videos Tagged: Apple Music, Beats 1 Radio, Drake, ovosound
AllHipHop

Luke Wilson — Bitch Betta Have My Money! Beats Ex-Assistant in Court

Luke Wilson’s ex-assistant tried to act like he forgot, but the actor just scored a huge sum of money from the guy. Like brrap brrap brrap … A judge awarded Wilson $ 438k from Charles Lodi — the former employee he sued for using his credit cards to…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Celebrity Justice


China Box Office: Homegrown ‘Monk’ Beats ‘Jurassic World’


Chen Kaige’s martial arts movie ‘Monk Comes Down The Mountain’ knocks the dinosaurs off the top spot after two weeks.

read more



International

Dr. Dre’s “The Pharmacy With Dr. Dre” Beats 1 Radio Show To Launch

Dr. Dre is slated to host a radio show on Beats 1 radio.


HipHopDX News

Run The Jewels & Q-Tip Announce Beats 1 Shows

Apple Music launched earlier this week and the rollout has been just as robust and streamlined as one would expect from the powerhouse company.

One of the most enticing announcements with the rollout was Beats 1 radio, which features programs hosted from the likes of Dr. Dre, Drake, Pharrell, Jaden Smith, HOT 97’s Ebro Darden and more; all under the guise of BBC’s Zane Lowe.

Not to be left out on the festivities, Run The Jewels have just announced their own weekly radio show on Apple Music’s new global radio station tonight and airing every Friday at 6pm PST / 9pm EST. The attention grabbing duo were reportedly hand-picked for the station by Zane Lowe himself and the program will serve as Beats 1’s only non-studio produced show on the station, seeing that the group have become natural rolling stones thanks to their continuous popularity and world tours. Trackstar the DJ will serve as the show’s producer and mixer.

Legendary MC Q-Tip of A Tribe Called Quest has also been called to action on Abstract Radio which airs directly after at 7pm PDT / 10 pm EST.

Subscribe to Beats 1 here.

run-the-jewels-beats-1


Photos: WENN, Beats 1

The post Run The Jewels & Q-Tip Announce Beats 1 Shows appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

Hip-Hop Wired

Drake, Dr. Dre & Pharrell Among Several Stars With Radio Shows On Beats 1

Tech giant Apple has already conquered the worlds of smartphones and moving into the realm of wearable devices. The next stop for the company and its Apple Music arm is the launching of its free radio service Beats 1, which will feature some big celebrity names as hosts of their own programs.

This coming Tuesday, BBC Radio 1 DJ Zane Lowe will spearhead Beats 1, which is a free, streaming Internet radio station platform that will blast across smartphones, laptops, and other smart devices. The New York Times profiled Lowe and examined parts of his upcoming venture, while announcing some of the big names that are set to have their own stations such as Drake, Dr. Dre, Pharrell, Jaden Smith and several other stars.

More from the Times:

The new gig also puts Mr. Lowe, 41, in the middle of the music industry’s latest battleground: streaming. Beats 1 is part of a revamped music strategy for Apple, which revolutionized the music world with iTunes and the iPod but lately has sat on the sidelines as upstarts like Spotify, Pandora and SoundCloud lure listeners by making it easy to play songs online.

Last year, Apple paid $ 3 billion for one of those upstarts, Beats, and this month the company unveiled a multifaceted new service, Apple Music, which in addition to Beats 1 includes a subscription streaming service and a media platform for artists called Connect. It has signed a gaggle of celebrities to do shows on Beats 1, among them Pharrell Williams, Drake, even Elton John. Yet the mixed reaction to Apple’s plans — including a complaint by Taylor Swift over royalties that led to a remarkable turnaround by Apple — shows how volatile the streaming music market is.


Dr. Dre’s show will be, fittingly, titled “The Pharmacy,” while Lowe, Hot 97’s Ebro Darden, and  Julie Adenuga will have weekday anchor duties on Beats 1.

Learn more about Beats 1 here.

Photo: Apple Music

The post Drake, Dr. Dre & Pharrell Among Several Stars With Radio Shows On Beats 1 appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

Hip-Hop Wired

Binaural Beats – Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats - Binaural Beats  artwork

Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: April 8, 2011

© ℗ 2011 Relax Records

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Binaural Beats – Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats - Binaural Beats  artwork

Binaural Beats

Binaural Beats

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: May 8, 2012

© ℗ 2011 Brainwave Media

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals – Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Dope Boy's Hip Hop Instrumentals - Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals  artwork

Hip Hop Instrumentals: Rap Beats, Freestyle Beats, Trap Beats, Rap Instrumentals

Dope Boy’s Hip Hop Instrumentals

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: January 22, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Hip Hop Beat Factory LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

NFL’s Willie Gault — I’M NOT A CROOK … Beats Wrap In Alleged Heart Device Scheme

Ex-NFL speedster Willie Gault is PUMPED UP … because a jury just found he’s not guilty in an alleged scheme to blow up the stock price of his heart device company.  After he hung up his cleats, Fast Willie became the CEO of Heart Tronics (which…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Celebrity Justice


I Hate it When Science Beats Art

Over at Business Insider they are running my Slideshare presentation (based on my book) about systems versus goals, and passion being overrated. But here’s the interesting part.

Most of you remember a year ago when I was pimping my book on success like crazy and failing to get many people interested. I tried a lot of approaches to get attention, but none made a dent in the public’s consciousness. In other words, the artist in me that has instincts and intuitions and other arty feelings was a failure at marketing.

So I tried science to see how that would compare. I hired Rexi Media to help me put together the Slideshare using science to make my message more powerful and memorable. It turns out that there are plenty of studies suggesting how to do this sort of thing, so with Rexi Media’s help I wrapped my message in a science-approved formula and put it out in the world.

The science-driven Slideshare outperformed everything else I tried, by a wide margin. And now, many months later, Business Insider took an interest in it and turned it into one of the hottest items on their page. See the “heat” indicator on each item below it.

image

I find this a humbling experience because I thought I had a good handle on what people would find interesting and engaging. I don’t. But science filled the gap. And the book popped back into the top ten list for self-help books.

Scott Adams

@ScottAdamsSays (my dangerous tweets)

My book on success: “It’s already working for me, as I have started implementing what I have learned…” – D. Limbach


Scott Adams Blog

It Pays to Be a Nerd — Gamer Beats Out Beyonce, Jay Z for Epic L.A. House

A 35-year-old Swedish video game programmer just got the prized house that Jay Z and Beyonce also wanted … TMZ has learned.Our real estate sources tell us … Markus Persson plunked down $ 70 million cash for a 23,000 square foot palace in Bev…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Music


Find Out More About Metro Boomin’s Drop on His Beats

Metro Boomin is increasingly becoming one of the most popular producers in the game, and that means his “Metro Boomin want some more” drop has taken on a life of it’s own. In DJ Booth’s A3C sit-down with Metro, he goes over just how much the internet has taken over that famous phrase.

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Filed under: Videos Tagged: DJ Booth, Metro Boomin
AllHipHop

Chats with ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons, Rich Robinson, The English Beat’s Dave Wakeling and Leela James, Plus Sin Cos Tan

2014-06-20-8112nxvsIiL._SL1500_.jpg

2014-06-20-91aQhxdPOL._SL1432_.jpg

A Conversation with ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons

Mike Ragogna: Billy, in addition to ZZ Top’s tour, there’s a new double disc retrospective CD at Warners being released as well as your Live At Montreux concert at Eagle Rock. Considering your over forty years together are being presented yet contrasted with these two releases, what have you observed to be the biggest changes between the ZZ Top of 1969 and now?

Billy F. Gibbons: We have a much better way of getting to the gigs. Back then it was a van with all the gear stuffed inside and now we go by motor coach and our gear is transported in a semi. The crowds now are a bit bigger… We once played a gig attended by exactly one paying customer but we gave him the full show; bought him a Coke at the end to show our appreciation. Did we mention the food? We’ve come a long way from hash and Big Red Soda but always reserve the right to go back.

MR: Your Live At Montreux 2013 DVD and Blu-ray presents ZZ Top features material from the very early days. Do those songs still have the same impact on you and the guys as they did when you first began performing?

BFG: Absolutely, yes. The prism of time has a way of turning coal into diamonds. We loved those early songs then and still do now. You know… We’re the same three guys–wait for it–playing the same three chords.

MR: Do you have a couple of favorite moments from the Live At Montreux 2013 performances? You’ve played Montreux before, but other than its having been recorded for a release, in your opinion, was there something particularly magical or different about this concert that separates it from prior Montreux performances?

BFG: It was definitely special. We wanted to do something to honor the memory of Claude Nobs who founded the festival and had been our friend for many years. He died quite unexpectedly earlier in that year so we knew we had to do something very special. Since he was a jazz aficionado, we thought we’d jazz things up a big and, to that end, flew in two jazz cats from Austin–Mike Flanigin on B-3 and Van Wilkes on second guitar. Yes, in Claude’s honor, ZZ Top was a five piece groove unit for part of the set.

MR: Does the band have any favorites from the catalog that you still can’t wait to get to in the set list?

BFG: We have an inclusionary policy. If we recorded it or sort of know it we’re game to play it. We perform songs from “ZZ Top’s First Album” quite regularly and do some stuff we’ve never recorded like Willie Brown’s “Future Blues.” That song dates from 1930 and, as you know, Willie Brown is named checked by none other than Robert Johnson in “Crossroads.” He recorded it for Paramount Records, the label that Jack White has been highlighting of late. And we also do some new stuff.. quite a few off our most recent album, La Futura, the title of which may very well have been inspired by that selfsame Willie Brown, don’tcha know?

MR: At the time, how surprising was the huge success of “Gimme All Your Lovin’,” “Legs” and “Sharp Dressed Man” as both audio and videos hits to the band?

BFG: We approached the video revolution very gingerly. The band figured to just kind of stay in the background and keep the focus on the pretty girls and that little red car. Seems like everybody didn’t mind we were bystanders in our own videos and the rest, as they say, is history.

MR: In the eighties–the age of videos breaking or significantly supporting recording artists–ZZ Top created some of the most fun and outrageous clips in rotation. Your videos maintained a video theme for the group, as if each video were an episode of a series. How did the scripts come together and was there a point when ZZ Top was writing songs with the videos in mind?

BFG: We worked with our renegade director, Tim Newman, Randy’s cousin, as it happened. Tim is very inventive and intuitive. Although we didn’t write songs with video actually in mind, yet we do tend to think and, perhaps, create, with a subliminal cinematic sense.

MR: What are your thoughts about some of your other trademark songs like “Tush” and “La Grange”?

BFG: They’re great. “La Grange” put us on the map in terms of Top 40 radio and we just love to do that “haw, haw, haw” part. “Tush” was written in about as long as it takes to perform. It just jumped up during a searingly sweltering soundcheck and it’s been part of the set ever since. The subject matter in both songs seems to retain a certain universal appeal.

MR: “Degüello”, with “I’m Bad I’m Nationwide,” “I Thank You,” “Cheap Sunglasses,” and more is considered one of the band’s best albums and personally, I don’t think there’s a weak moment. Might this have been the album that changed everything up as far as ZZ Top’s approach to creating projects?

BFG: The entirety of the “Degüello” recordings, and certainly the mixing, unfolded in Memphis and that soulful setting kind of changed the way we thought about recording and the mystery of the process. Great records made in Memphis goes back for decades and when ZZ hit town, the skill set was in place when we jumped in. “I Thank You,” being a Sam and Dave song that was a Stax Records hit is just that–a thank you to Memphis and the vibe it imbues.

MR: Beautiful. So the band is coming up on 45 years of working together with its original lineup. What’s the musical and personal partnership like with you, Dusty and Frank after all these years?

BFG: It’s intact and ready to go for another 45. We three have a really fine time getting out there playing. We maintain a constant reunion of that early era if you like, so one can think of the last 3 decades as keeping one foot in them blues! On occasion, arriving at a venue early, the game is racing radio controlled cars over the parking lot. Yes, remaining eighteen is our mental immaturity and there ain’t nothin’ wrong with that… Rock on…!

MR: What do you think the state of bluesrock is in these days? Do you think there are any acts out there that might represent some of the best of the field?

BFG: There’ a host of great acts out and about. Like what Black Joe Louis & the Honeybears are doing in Austin and how the Black Keys are putting it down from their current Nashville base. There are lots more… What about Serbian blues chanteuse Ana Popovic? The girl can play. As far as pure singers are concerned, we’re big Shemekia Copeland fans.

MR: Traditional question…what advice do you have for new artists?

BFG: Get out there and play! We don’t know of any other way, especially, if you don’t have pin-up looks.

MR: Any plans or projects in the works for the band or individually in the immediate future?

BFG: We’re thinking about our next album…already have some songs rattling around. The big news for us is a string of dates coming up in a few months with Jeff Beck. That is going to be a tour when we wish we could be in the audience.

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A Conversation with The Black Crowes’ Rich Robinson

Mike Ragogna: Rich, The Ceaseless Sight, what’s the vision of the album and what was the creative process?

Rich Robinson: I knew I wanted to make a record and it worked out perfectly, time-wise. I knew we weren’t going to be touring after 2013. Instead of going in with full songs, I had more skeletons. I had a chorus or a verse or whatever and then when we got into the studio, we used that energy of, “We’ve got to get this done.” We had a short time, we only had a month to make the record. A lot of times, that happens in Woodstock, or in the studio in general. You have a couple of ideas, but when you get in the context–especially with me, because I like to write with drums in the room–you get in that context and it kind of clears the path and allows for that energy to come through and create those songs. I didn’t necessarily have a context going into this record. For twenty-five years, I’ve always tried to approach making records as a collection of songs that create something slightly greater than one song as a whole piece. The sequence of a record, the songs of a record, how does the verse fit into a song, how does the chorus fit into a song, how do they songs fit into a record, how does the record fit into my body of work? How does that fit into twenty-five years of doing this? To answer the question of the uniqueness of this record, a lot of times, I would have songs done before I went into the studio. For twenty-five years, I would have ten or fifteen almost done going into the studio, but this time, like I said, I’m just using skeletons.

Some songs took a while to write. “Down The Road” was a song where I had this verse part for a long time and every time I would sit down with it it wasn’t ready to be finished and then I finished it and that was it. Then “I Know You” and “Giving Key” I wrote right there on the spot. It took about five minutes to write those songs. In a sense everything just flowed for those two songs. It doesn’t make eitehr song more or less valid, it just makes them different. Over the years with Crowes there have been songs that took me a long time to write. I wrote the verse to “Nonfiction” early on Southern Harmony but I dind’t finish it until Amorica. It took a year and a half to find the right parts to make that. There’ve been songs like that over the years. I just kind of look at it as this one giant experience as opposed to this singular experrience. But I like how they all fit into a greater piece of work.

MR: “Ceaseless Sight” has larger a concept, “Giving Key” has a larger concept. It looks like lyrically and conceptually, you took a bigger swing with this album.

RR: Yeah, I think so. I think creatively and lyrically, yeah. I focus on the music first and throughout writing the songs, I’ll come up with a melody idea or maybe a concept for the actual song, just a general, “This is about this” or “This might be about that.” Then I just sit and listen to the song over and over again in the studio and just start writing, finishing lyrics to it. But absolutely, the whole point of this record is to look forward and not look backwards and to let go of a lot of s**t. I think at least for me and I think a lot of people on Earth tend to look backwards or try to choose what’s easy or what you know. They don’t want to know what’s around the corner, and I think it’s comforting in that sense. I think we’re designed to be comforted by knowing what we can expect, so in that sense, this world is becoming more and more that way. Our politics are tailored to what we want and there are outlets now for that. “I only watch MSNBC” or “I only watch Fox News” or “I only read The Drudge Report,” you know what I mean? There doesn’t seem to be a general acceptance of what “is.” It seems like there used to be at least a general accepted idea that the world is round and gravity exists. Now it’s like, “is it really round?”

MR: You forgot how we’ve only been around for five thousand years and the dinosaurs came over on Noah’s Ark.

RR: Yeah, but the dinosaurs were vegetarians, so they didn’t eat humans and that’s why we lived. But that’s the thing! If we can’t all agree on some common, basic facts, we’re kind of f**ked. In that same sense, the way that we now consume everything–clothes and hard goods. But we also now consume politics. We consume news stories, we consume drama, we consume music, we consume books. It’s more of an approach from a service industry, so we expect our art now to service us instead of the art to challenge us…any sort of creative endeavor, since we’ve been in existence. If you were in 1600, you would go see a piece of art and you were privileged to go see it. But if you think about what you saw, the visuals were given, and it was always something greater than yourself, always something you could strive to be. It’s what Joseph Campbell talked about, it’s what the amazing people throughout the millennia talked about, something greater than oneself. Art always did that.

MR: But isn’t it the Selfie Era?

RR: Yeah, absolutely. I open an Instagram account and the majority of them are girls taking pictures of themselves, and then you see these dudes taking selfies everywhere, but it’s really interesting where that has gone. It’s an absorption of the self. If you used to be self-absorbed in the past, how many outlets could you deal with that on? Now we’re on a newer level with technology and the amount of absorption that you can have is f**king crazy. Not only can you absorb yourself in yourself, you can absorb all of the influences in life around you to yourself. You can choose the media that you can absorb, you can choose the movies, you can choose your fashion and your friends and it’s this f**king Bizarro World to me.

MR: It’s fun to glamourize and worship yourself!

RR: Absolutely! But on the flip side, and the great thing about life and the world is that everything’s a paradox. As you have that ability, there are people who are rejecting it and actually pulling out and saying, “You know what? I don’t want that.” You think about the resurgence of vinyl, you think about the resurgence of independent film and indie bands releasing records or these kinds of things and there is a movement that is growing and bubbling and it is real and they are great. There are really great bands out there. There are great bands that are out there playing and they don’t really play that game. And there are people who listen to those bands and have more respect. The harder you have to work for something, the more respect you should get. If you can walk into any store in America, hit a Shazam button and the Shazam will tell you exactly what the song is playing and then you can hit another button and all of a sudden, you own that song within three seconds. How can you have respect for that? How is that not disposable?

But if you go to a store and you buy a vinyl and you throw down physical money or a credit card, just the act of that in a living, breathing place where there’s smells, where there’s physical things that you can touch tactilely, your finger prints are on this thing and you see this album with artwork that someone took the time to make and there’s titles of songs and a gatefold. When you go home and you pull the vinyl out and put it on the turntable, something chemically happens in your brain that says, “You are experiencing something,” and you have more respect for it because it took a lot more work to do that. Listening to the record takes more work. You go to put a vinyl on and you listen to it, you’ve got to sit by it because it’s short. One side of a record is fucking short and if you get up and leave and watch TV or whatever by the time you get back your needle’s f**ked because it’s been digging into the end of the side. You have to be vigilant about it. If you’re vigilant about something, you have more respect for you’re going to pay more attention to it. It’s something that I think gives us all a deeper experience. That’s what it’s about. That’s what this record’s about. Something authentic and deep.

MR: And from a lyrical standpoint, you were clearly looking for something bigger to talk about.

RR: Oh yeah, absolutely. Universal themes that have run through humanity since the dawn of time, since people started thinking. We’ve gotten away from those things. And also spirituality, what spirituality means and where I am as a person and where we are as humans, what the f**k are we doing here? Are we literally here to just buy more s**t? It’s because, like I said, it’s so easy to just surround yourself with what’s familiar. That’s the easy way out. It’s easy to become pessimistic. It’s easy to just think, “Oh, everything sucks, everything sucks.” But the world is your perception and if you just turn your perception around and think, “Everything’s cool,” not everything does suck… There are some problems, but it’s not the problem that’s the problem, it’s how you perceive the problem, you know what I mean? In that sense, a little optimism always goes a long way.

MR: Rich, it could have been easier to just create within The Black Crowes, but you went for the solo career. It was because you wanted to say different things than what was going on with the band, right?

RR: Absolutely. Also, my brother is the mouthpiece of the Crowes and what his beliefs aren’t what my beliefs are necessarily. A lot of times when he would do press he would say a lot of things that I didn’t necessarily agree with or weren’t my position. So it’s kind of cool to get away and express myself this way. In The Crowes my expression was music, I wrote the music and Chris wrote the lyrics. Music is a more esoteric expression. There’s nothing that’s concrete in the expression of music. It’s very subconscious and ethereal and different people will get different things out of it. That’s what I love about it, but there’s also another element to that which is lyrical, and there’s also another element to expressing yourself which is being able to come out from this thing that is what it is and has been around for so long that the band is kind of stuck in it. I wanted to pull away from that and start a more free form of expression just for myself. That’s what I hoped to accomplish on the record, and all my records, but as time goes on and as I do more and get more comfortable with it I get to open up and see the light and see positivity.

MR: And it’s a ceaseless sight.

RR: Yeah, exactly.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

RR: I’ve worked with some younger bands producing and writing and the only thing that I try to tell them is whatever you do, do it for the right reason. If you write music that moves you, if you write music that’s authentic and sincere eventually someone will come around and like it, but if you only want to be a celebrity the world’s better off if you just fuck off and go do something else. Figure out another way to be a celebrity. Be on a reality TV show or whatever the f**k it is. The creation and your intention behind the creation is too important to the world. I think that people who create should feel a responsibility in their creating. You can argue whether it’s good, bad… Everyone’s going to have their opinion. Some people are going to like it, some people are going to hate it, but if your intention is true and you’re true to yourself and you write something that’s authentic and means something to you, that intention will move forth in the universe. That’s all that is lacking. If you can do that, then f**k it. Whether you’re playing in front of five people for the rest of your night or five hundred thousand people it’s still righteous because it’s coming from a more righteous place.

MR: Is this what you would have told the fifteen year-old who wrote “She Talks To Angels?”

RR: S**t, I kind of did. That was something that moved me, I wrote it and I was proud of it and it was genuine. That’s how I’ve always done it. I think there are people out there who do that, but I just think if you say, “I’m gonna go start a band,” what everyone seems to do now is focus on social media. “If I do this I’ll get fifty hits,” and then you go back to this whole selfie thing and it’s all about shameless self-promotion. “If I like this guy on Twitter then my band gets out there and the four thousand people this guy has will look at my band.” It’s almost like this weird corporate branding gone wild. It’s cross branding. “Well I like that guy and he likes me and that guy…” what it becomes is, “You do for me and I’ll do for you,” and that’s all it is. You have that and then some bands are great at videos, they have their video faces down, and then the next thing will be the social media faces and their image and the music is last. The music should come first. None of that other s**t matters. If you’re coming from a sincere place and writing music that means something to you that vibration goes out into the universe and that’s what’s righteous. If it’s meant to be the laws of attraction will attract fans to you and the fans that like you will like you because what you’re doing is not full of s**t. It’s not duping anyone, it’s not bulls**t, it’s real. That’s just how I see it.

MR: So you left because of what you had to say, what you had to get out from inside.

RR: Exactly.

MR: What does the future look like for Rich Robinson?

RR: We’re touring, obviously we have a bunch of dates coming up, it’s going to be cool, these shows are going great, the band’s really gelling well together. Joe [Magistro] and I have been playing together for ten years now, and Matt and Ted and Dan who are all in the band. We just started playing together about a month ago but it’s going really well. We’re going to focus on that, we have that going on and then we’re planning on doing another art show in the fall with my brother-in-law. We paint and do that, we’re also working on a sculpture.

MR: Do you take the paint set on the road with you?

RR: No, I work on bigger canvasses and I use oil so they wouldn’t dry. I have to sit still to do that kind of stuff.

MR: Were you always the kid who was creating things?

RR: Yeah, kind of. I would say so. It brings joy. If you follow your joy, you’re good to go.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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photo courtesy of The English Beat

A Conversation with The English Beat’s Dave Wakeling

Mike Ragogna: Dave, you’re doing a pledge campaign tied into your new album?

Dave Wakeling: We are, indeed. This pledge campaign is to attract Medicci-like benefactors who pledge to buy the album in advance for any of the exciting premiums we put in, like you can shred guitars with Dave for an afternoon or you can go for dinner with me or you can travel on the tour bus for a couple of days or travel in the van in California. We’ve always been quite close to the people who come to our concerts, we’re pretty easy to get hold of, but this takes it a step further, now. It’s quite been fun. People can come to the studio and sing on the chorus of a song, for example, and depending on how good their voice is that’s how loud it will be in the mix.

MR: What is it that you’re expecting ultimately from this?

DW: We’ve got demos of about twenty songs and we’re feeling thoroughly confident, I must say, that we’ll use those demos and play them and put the lyrics up on the pledge page. It’s a way of trying to attract people to pledging for the project by giving them access to the behind the scenes, warts and all. Well, hopefully no warts. I think it’s really quite interesting because the record company largesse is taken out in a way, isn’t it? Everybody pledges to buy an album for ten bucks and that actually pays for the studio to make the record. I like it. It’s another different thing that’s happening with the twenty-first century, isn’t it. The record industry has turned on its head somewhat. It’s still the same thing, it’s not completely different, it’s just a hundred eighty degrees different.

MR: What do you think about that? What do you think about being a band in this environment versus when you had a different recording and marketing paradigm?

DW: I prefer it. Don’t get me wrong, the record company business was terrific, but then you realized you were paying for everything a couple of years later. So that part of it wasn’t that much fun. But there was something charming about a young executive being willing to lend four alcoholics half-a-million dollars to see if they could remember any of their tunes when they get to the studio. That was very decent of them. So they did have their role, but there’s something clean about this that’s nice. It’s not all bribery and money under the table; it’s pretty straightforward. I think it’s a little bit like working live on the road, I’m now doing the traditional ceremony of playing, going home to the tour bus and I’m now at Wal-Mart buying myself flour, soup and a pair of dumb bells. I’m thinking of getting some of these kettle bells. They’re new, aren’t they? Have you ever used them?

MR: Yeah.

DW: What do you think? Do you like them?

MR: You have to be very careful to do it right, otherwise you can hit yourself in a very bad spot.

DW: [laughs] I was just trying it as you said that, it’s not good. I’m sticking with the regular blue ten-pounders and such. You can’t do that in the back of the bus. You can’t swing a cat in the back of the bus. In fact, there’s a sign, “No logs in the bog and no swinging cats,” or something like that.

MR: Are there rituals that you don’t want to violate after all these years?

DW: There are rituals, yes, but they’re all mainly to do with violation. That’s why we all end up in groups. Let’s cut to the chase here: Anybody in a group, anybody who works with groups, deals with groups, writes about groups or even goes to watch groups and listens to music are basically a sociopath. Something happened at a very young age that made us run to music from the awful pressures to whatever it was that was going on outside. Take all that with a pinch of salt. That’s all we risk now, is a pinch of salt. We can’t risk anything stronger than that now.

MR: The English Beat is considered one of the great ska bands, though your music has other influences like punk and reggae.

DW: We wanted to mix it up, you know? We wanted a punky reggae party and it came out very similar to a ska beat, sort of up-four peppy beat with an equal off beat hitting with the on beat. On this new album I’m to try to see if I can get what I originally wanted: I wanted the Velvet Underground jamming with Toots & The Maytals. That’s what I wanted. I wanted the urban angst that I felt from Birmingham, but I wanted the uplifting sense of life and joy and survival from Toots & The Maytals’ rhythm section. I wanted those two bands jamming together and then I would sing over the top of course like Bryan Ferry or Van Morrisson or one of those.

MR: In the United States, your music was featured in High Fidelity, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off…

DW: …and Clueless, that’s the big one. “Tenderness” was in Clueless, and then you’ve got Gross Pointe Blank and then the Scooby Doo episode entitled “Dance Of The Undead,” which is probably my greatest artistic creation to date, frankly. There are two songs in this battle of the bands and the songs are so well-matched against each other it takes Scooby Doo to come in on all fours–or the two back ones, anyway–shredding guitar to win it for the Hex Girls versus the power of the song we wrote. That was really one of my proudest moments.

MR: There’s something about The English Beat meeting Scooby Doo that just seems right.

DW: I met one of the original writers who drew me a very nice picture and he told me a lot of stories about those original sessions at Hanna-Barbara in the valley, and I’m right on the same page. I knew it even as a kid, but when I checked, yep, I knew it.

MR: When you look at The English Beat now versus when you started it, what are the differences?

DW: I never guessed that I would write a song that anybody would hear other than the other people who were stupid enough to join a pop group with me. So for them to come out and for people to like the songs and it goes on for a few years and then really famous people cover your songs and it’s still on the radio when it’s twenty or thirty years later, it really is the greatest gift that a troubadour could ever hope for. You hope to wander round the world singing your odes or whatever they are and you hope that you touch hearts along the way. I’m honored and sort of humbled, which is weird for me. I don’t get humbled that often. Only by women. They’re very good at humbling me.

MR: Are any of the songs in particular that you love to play live?

DW: Yeah! Especially these last couple of weeks, because I just started talking to a producer called Dubmatix, out of Toronto. We started working up some versions from the demos and I’m just on fire with it. He’s a great musician and he’s got a ton of really good samples. I heard stuff while I was writing the songs and I wanted to include it to set the mood and the atmosphere. There’s a song called “Said We Would Never Die,” and in my head as I was singing it, I could hear a breathing machine in an ICU and I heard an old-fashioned sixties black and white English movie ambulance siren and the beep-beep of the machines, and it made an orchestra of medical emergency sounds. We’ve been working on that this last couple of days and he’s done a fantastic job. I told him, “Black and white English movie rainy day ambulance siren” and it was just the absolute perfect one. You could almost see the film. [siren noises] “I say, sir, are you having some trouble? Tally-ho! White Hall double two, double two!”

MR: Do you feel like modern technology has actually enhanced The Beats’ sound or creativity?

DW: I think it’s enhanced everything. It’s allowed the classic songs to get more life and breath and radio stations with wider and deeper playlists have ended up championing some of the songs. They weren’t always top forty monsters at the time, IRS records hadn’t really joined that game. We were college darlings and we made top two hundred on the billboard chart quite often, so we felt jealous at the time, I’ll be honest, because a lot of songs that were getting that top forty push weren’t as good. The massive hits rode more on the strength of their haircuts than their lyrics I thought. But anyway, you soaked it up, and the shows did well and our albums did well, but we never made any singles business. Now I feel happier with each year because I get to hear more and more of our songs on classic rock radio and I hear less and less of the ones that seemed like they were just trying it on at the time. “Wear this shirt, it should sound like this shirt.” “Okay, I’ve got it.” It just seemed a little slavish. Certainly I was jealous and now I don’t feel so bad about it because our songs have prevailed and of course I got a couple of really nice mentions. I always thought I was going to have to pay somebody to say it, but they brought out a best-of box set, a very nicely done job by Shout! Factory. Rolling Stone gave it a smashing review and said, “Wittily savage as Costello.” It was like, “Hello, there we go, me and Declan on the same page. Exactly. We just did a tour in England and a fellow from The Quietus magazine enjoyed the show, thank heavens, and said I was to be spoken of in the same breath as the greats of the genre; Weller, Strummer, Wakeling, which sounds like a company of accountants, doesn’t it? But it had a ring to me. Weller, Strummer, Costello, Wakeling. Yeah, there you go, that’s what I always thought. [laughs]

So here we are, I’m really glad that I still have both knees operating, I can still skank, I’m singing better than ever, which is remarkable, and enjoying myself on stage more than ever. The band is tighter than it’s ever been, there’s a really nice vibe. I just got on the bus today and everybody’s thrilled because they got a big wide bunk bed instead of a narrow one, so they’re all thrilled. I’m nearly at the end of my Wal-Mart ritual, I didn’t really buy much, some soup, some fruit, some almonds and walnuts, a kettle, an ab-roller. I have some remedial work to do, to be honest. I stopped drinking rather abruptly last September–again. I lost an enormous amount of weight, but sadly the weight didn’t send a message to my skin that it wasn’t needed so I’ve got to work on my tummy next. it’s a shame, it was just the right size when I was overweight from the beer, When I had a pot belly, the skin was just perfectly formed around it and quite soft. Now, oh dear, no. So I’ve given myself a challenge, frankly, there’s a lot of stuff going on between now and the record coming out in February and one of the things is I’m going to get this stomach looking great or else I’m going to get it made to look great. The challenge is on, I’m going to see what I can do.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

DW: Well, you have to work on a song all night until the hairs go up on your neck. If the hairs don’t go up on your neck, don’t put any more time into that one. If you’re going to try and write something that moves other people, you have to write something that has quite a dramatic effect on yourself. It has to give you quite a jolt when you write it, “Whoa, blimey! That’s a little edgy, Dave!” Or it makes you cry or you might be crying when you write it. So it has to be loaded with emotion. You don’t want to waste a word in a song, really. One bad line’s enough to take away the power of the two around it. You have to weigh every word. It takes me about ten minutes to write a song and then about nine months to finish it. That can include a week, really, of wondering if something should be sung as a semi colon or a comma, and I just drive myself nuts over it. You can’t sleep, you’re wandering around chain-smoking, “What’s the matter?” “Oh, nothing!” You don’t dare tell them it’s because you don’t know whether to use the word “yet” or “but.” [laughs] But it seems important at the time. I just think the nicest things are complicated things that come across as simple. What I really dislike is really simple things that are all tarted-up to look really complicated. That’s something I think you need to do. You need to put an enormous amount of work into it to make it feel effortless. That’s probably true for everything, but it’s definitely true for writing a song.

MR: What does the future look like for David Wakeling and for The English Beat?

DW: I’m doing everything that I want, I can’t imagine doing anything else. At the moment, I think I’m just intrigued by, “How do we make this record?” How do you make a statement that resonates with people who liked your records thirty years ago and still might but are different? And at the same time, how do you make a record that sounds like it’s this year? In the same way as in 1979, I didn’t want to sound like it was 1963 from Kingston, Jamaica. Now I don’t want to sound like Birmingham in 1979 because I want to be from California in 2014, so that’s the challenge–how to finesse that. That’s keeping me excited at the moment. One of the funniest bits of songwriting is the presentation. You’ve got somebody who’s got every sound in the world as a sample at their fingertips and they say, “Right, 1963 ambulance with a Boeing jet and two eggs frying,” and he can just do that and sing over the top of it. With the more options you’ve got the more diligence you’ve got to have. With each new idea for a song, on goes the headphoens and you’ve got to try and feel what that part does to me whilst I’m singing it and carefully think about instrumentation. I think with this record I wanted to try and make it so the vocals and the melodies are what come straight at you and everything else is around it dramatically to support and project. I think there are some really great pop records being made at the moment that manage to do that quite well and not necessarily having a whole band going, “One, two, three, four,” and everybody just starts at the beginning and stops at the end. They’re going to be constructive songs that have the minimum amount of support to make it appear effortless. It’s going to take an enormous amount of hard work to get to that point but we’ll get it. “Let the songs lead the way,” is what we normally say. “Does that make the hair go up on your neck more, or less?” If it makes the hair go up more you’re probably on the right track.

MR: Nice. We talked about a lot of things, is there something we didn’t cover?

DW: No, I’ve been busily going down the cleaning aisle and there’s not much controversy there. You’ll be pleased to know that Wal-Marts are starting to get a number of more organic and planetary options. I managed to get some surface wipes that are just made of lemongrass and thyme. Even at Wal-Mart they’re starting to be different.

MR: Guess everything evolves.

DW: You know, apart from me, sometimes. I get stuck. But yeah, just like Huffington Post, I remember when that started I was like, “Oh, that’s quite a good idea!” Now, it’s like the biggest news thing in the world. It’s kind of nice with all those correspondents and people being able to get involved and connect. It’s a bit like this pledge thing. They’re early days yet but I think it’s a sign of new society. To be honest, I don’t know whether we’ll have a chance to see it through. Some of the naysayers would rather stand in the jolly-good circle and execute each other. Shoot some sense into each other, that’s the only language some people understand. We might have to deal with that bunch, but there are some very interesting evolutionary changes going on. But my kids in California, for example, I find them very interesting because they don’t refer to any of their friends by what color they are. They don’t notice. It’s not a point of reference now. For my parents, it was a point of reference on who you didn’t speak to. “Oh, is that your black friend, then?” But now they don’t notice. They’re in the California sunshine so they’re all kind of the same color anyway, but they don’t notice. I just think that’s amazing. You sit in and listen sometimes, and the contents of their character is more important than the color of their skin. That’s how teenagers are now in America, that’s evolution.

MR: It’s a great thing. It seems like the people who will just go down swinging on stuff like that are people who were born in a certain era and they’ve seemed to all gravitated to these paranoid, fringe associations.

DW: I think you’re right. But things are moving generally in the right direction, though like you say, some people are afraid of social change. Most often, they’re people who have been brainwashed by their parents in one way or the other. I think they’re fascinating times and thank heavens we’ve got stuff like Pledge Music and stuff like Huffington Post and all sorts of different ways now to share and create information, which I think is all for the good. I’m pleasantly excited. And I’m pleased that I’ve done a very specific Wal-Mart run. I haven’t bought any junk food. I used to have somebody come to Wal-Mart with me and we always used to end up with four hundred bucks worth of junk food, but I haven’t got any junk food at all tonight, I’ve got fruit and nuts and healthy organic soups, I even bought a box of green tea but we’ll see about that. Only if all the rest of the tea and the coffee’s run out. But no, we’re going to try it, come on.

MR: I wish you luck with everything. The album’s coming in February?

DW: Yes, but if you go onto the pledge site we’re going to start putting up demos of the songs and lyrics of the songs and we’ll be showing little bits from the studio. From now, anybody who wants to pledge to buy the album or any of the other fancy prizes get to watch an inside scoop as it were on the making of the record and the demos and even interviews.

MR: This has been wonderful. I really appreciate your time, and let’s chat again in February when the album comes out!

DW: That would be great, man! It’s going to come out ostensibly the seventeenth, which is equidistant between my birthday on the nineteenth and Valentine’s on the fourteenth. I thought that was an auspicious week, so that’s what we’re aiming for. Who knows when it really comes out? When it’s done. That’s the plan, some time around then.

MR: Thank you so much for your time, Dave!

DW: Absolutely perfect timing, all the stuff’s being put into the Wal-Mart bag. That was good, I managed to do all my shopping and I spoke to a very nice fellow who contributes to one of the most powerful news media organizations in the world. You get to do some good things when you’re a singer.

MR: Oh, you…

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with Leela James

Mike Ragogna: Leela, how did your stint as a star on TV One’s RnBDivas LA come about?

Leela James: My experience doing the RnBDivas L.A. show was great, challenging, unexpected. I figured I knew what to expect, and I didn’t. Without giving up too much, let’s just say I look forward to it airing.

MR: Just how cool are Chante Moore, Lil’ Mo, Michel’le and Claudette Ortiz to work with?

LJ: For the most part it was cool working with everyone on the show.

MR: You received the 2008 Soul Train Music Award for Best R&B/Soul or Rap Artist of 2008. In 2014, what do you think “R&B” and “Soul” mean these days?

LJ: Soul music, however cliché this might sound, is really just music that comes from the soul, and is meant for the soul. To me, soul music is the same today as it was yesterday; soul music doesn’t change, the people that sing it changes.

MR: Does the “reality” element of the show stay pretty real or does it rely pretty equally on scripted dramas, etc., you know, the way virtually every other reality show exists?

LJ: Every reality show is different, and I can only speak to my experience doing RnBDivas. I can tell you it’s real.

MR: Your latest video for your hit “Say That” features Anthony Hamilton. How did this come together?

LJ: Anthony Hamilton and I always talked about working together over the years, and this time things just fell into place and we were able to make it happen. So much in the music world–and I guess in the world in general–is timing.

MR: Your last album was a tribute to Etta James, and you were called “Baby Etta” as a child. How were you originally introduced to her music and just how inspirational was she to your creative growth and who are some of your other influences?

LJ: Fortunately, I was exposed to all kinds of music growing up, and Etta James stood out as one of my favorite artists. I was inspired by the sound of her strong voice, I remember it hitting me like a wave.

MR: What was the tipping point where you made the decision you had to be a musical artist full time?

LJ: I decided I wanted to be an artist full time the day I got a standing ovation as child after singing at talent show. The look in the eyes of the people applauding for me made we want to continue singing for as long as I could.

MR: Does the “acting” portion of the TV show put any kind of surprising demands on you?

LJ: Trying to balance the TV world with my music world was the only challenge for me. In TV, the schedules are strict and the hours are long, and you’re not always allowed to be the creative one. Sometimes, you just follow directions. What’s interesting is that on television there is no real sense of impending reward; In music, the hours are crazy as well but there is instant gratification when you perform at the end of the day.

MR: Leela, what advice do you have for new artists?

LJ: I would advise new artists to simply try and perfect their craft. Keep working, keep writing, keep training. Also, when they are ready for it, acquire a strong team.

MR: Is there anything creatively that you’re thinking of experimenting with in the near future and when is your new album coming?

LJ: You’ll just have to wait and see! My new album Fall For You will be available July 8!

SIN COS TAN’S “LOVE SEES NO COLOUR”

Sin Cos Tan is the musical partnership of producer-DJ Jori Hulkkonen–Pet Shop Boys´Chris Lowe, Jose Gonzalez and Tiga–and Juho Paalosmaa, songwriter and vocalist from the group Villa Nah. They make upbeat pop music that features spiraling synths and catchy lyrics. The band’s forthcoming album Blown Away – an album about a middle-aged American whose life takes a 180 after joining a Mexican drug cartel – is out in August.

Jori Hulkkonen from Sin Cos Tan says, “When we were writing the songs for the album, I tried to turn all my ‘safeties off,’ so to speak; there’s no such thing as ‘too uplifting’ or ‘too big’ when it comes to a chorus. With ‘Love Sees No Colour,’ we wanted to write a feel-good song that would work as a stand alone single for the summer, but when in the context of the album, the slightly darker twist would be more obvious.”


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Beats music service sued by former executive amid possible sale to Apple

Colombia's track cyclist Edwin Alcibiades Avila Vanegas uses a pair of Beats by Dr. Dre headphones at the Velodrome during the London 2012 Olympic Games(Reuters) – Beats Electronics, which is close to being sold to Apple Inc for $ 3.2 billion, has been sued by the founder of a music service Beats bought two years ago claiming he has been cheated out of his share of the company. David Hyman, the founder of the music subscription service MOG Inc, filed a lawsuit on Wednesday in Los Angeles superior court claiming he was purposely terminated so that Beats could avoid granting him his equity stake in the company. Hyman claims that as part of the agreement Beats made to buy MOG in 2012, he would have been granted, over a period of time, 2.5 percent of the outstanding equity interest in Beats if the company reached a market value of $ 500 million or more. Rapper Dr. Dre and legendary music producer Jimmy Iovine, the founders of Beats Electronics, were not named in the lawsuit.



Music News Headlines – Yahoo News

Dr. Dre's Beats Electronics hit With $20 million-plus lawsuit

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Dr. Dre’s Beats Electronics hit With $20 million-plus lawsuit

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Apple nears deal to buy Dr. Dre's Beats Electronics for $3.2 billion

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