The Dead Center – Billy Senese

Billy Senese - The Dead Center  artwork

The Dead Center

Billy Senese

Genre: Horror

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: October 11, 2019


When a very dead suicide victim (Jeremy Childs, 'Preacher', 'Nashville') disappears from the morgue, it sets in motion a chain of events that has the power to immolate everything, and everyone, it touches. Troubled psychiatrist Daniel Forrester (Shane Carruth, 'Primer', 'Upstream Color') is drawn to help a mysterious patient who is brought to the emergency psych ward in a catatonic state with no memory of how he reached the hospital. As if to exorcise his own demons, the doctor feverishly tries to break through to his mysterious patient. But as a spate of mysterious deaths shake the ward to its core, Forrester comes to suspect that there is more to his new ward than meets the eye. As he comes to realise what he's unleashed, a desperate race against the forces of evil threatens to swallow him whole. 'The Dead Center' is a smart supernatural thriller that explores the demons that live inside all of us from writer-director Billy Senese, recently hailed as a "masterful new voice in terror".

© © 2019 Arrow Films

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Horror

Billy Porter Confirms He’s Starring in the Live-Action Cinderella Film

Billy Porter, 2019 New Yorker FestivalBibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo… Billy Porter just made our dreams come true.
The Pose star officially confirmed the news on Saturday evening at the New Yorker Festival. He’ll be playing the…


E! Online (US) – Top Stories
Entertainment News! –

Explore the world of Hustler today! Click now and enjoy…

Explore REAL today for the most erotic amateur sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Visit VCAXX Classics for the classics in adult entertainment at its best! Click now!

Hustler Taboo features the kinkiest sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Home – Billy Strings

Billy Strings - Home  artwork

Home

Billy Strings

Genre: Bluegrass

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 27, 2019

© ℗ 2019 Billy Strings, LLC., Under exclusive license to Rounder Records, a division of Concord Music Group, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Country

Kylie Minogue: Showtime – Billy Simpson

Billy Simpson - Kylie Minogue: Showtime  artwork

Kylie Minogue: Showtime

Billy Simpson

Genre: Documentary

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: March 29, 2016


Kylie Minogue has been a household name for over the last three decades. The Australian bombshell has become a symbol for female independence. She is a true showbiz product and an incredibly successful woman. She is a true showbiz woman. Kylie has been at the top of the charts virtually since 1988 when she released the world wide phenomenon "The Loco-Motion". Join Kylie and discover her incredible journey. It is time for Showtime.

© © 2016 Entertain Me Prodcuctions

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Designer Billy Reid on How to Look Fit and the One Thing Every Guy Should Do Before a Big Event

Have you ever noticed the guys who love to dole out style advice are often the ones that actually need some themselves? The guys with the real knowledge don’t feel the need to evangelize about how to get great style—you have to ask. That’s exactly what we did when we saw designer Billy Reid backstage at his Spring/Summer 2020 runway shot in Florence, AL, the location of his flagship store and his annual food and music festival, the Shindig.

Reid’s aesthetic—a mix of laid-back Southern roots and sharp New York sensibility—blends loose silhouettes, intricate patterns, and cool, neutral hues. It’s a style that’s born of inspiration and necessity.

“I’ve spent my whole career traveling to New York, Alabama—everywhere,” says Reid. “So I only keep things in my closet that fit me well and will outlast trends.”

Read on for Reid’s tips on building a closet, looking slimmer, and the one thing you should always do before any dressed-up event.


Our 2019 Fall Fashion Preview, Starring Yahya Abdul-Mateen II

Billy Reid
Courtesy Image

Buy Fewer—Better—Things

Billy’s approach to his closet is the same as his collection: quality over quantity. “It’s better to have high-quality pieces that really fit you well than just a lot of clothes taking up space,” Reid says. When paring down his closet, he asks himself what he would take on a two-week trip if he had to pack right then. Anything that doesn’t fit that mold gets the axe.

“That leaves me with my favorite jeans, my navy blazer, some T-shirts, a suit, exercise clothes, and then some more laid-back items,” he says. “Essentially, I boil it down to just what I need.” Reid wears clothes largely in solid neutrals like navy, black, white, and gray—with some small dashes of color—because they always look great together and will always make for a timeless look.

Essentially, I boil it down to just what I need.

“Of course, you’ll still have that tux you wear once or twice a year, but those everyday essentials can take you a lot of places.”

If you have a massive closet, a good place to start is weeding out anything you haven’t worn for the past year. Then you can start assembling the pieces you definitely want to keep by using Reid’s method.


7 Stylish and Sustainable Clothing Brands You Can Feel Good About Wearing

Don’t Overdo It

A tie bar or a pocket square can add some panache to your look and show off your personal style. However, wear them along with suspenders, a pocket square, a lapel pin, and a chain wallet, and you’ll come across as trying too hard.

“I love accessories,” Reid says. “I think men need them. But stick with just one.”

For example, if you’re wearing a sport coat, adding a pocket square can be a bold statement by itself. The temptation could be to combine it with other pieces, but Billy says the right way to nail the look is to commit to just one accessory and own it.

“You don’t need that extra lapel pin—unless you’re a senator.”


The Best Leather Boots to Wear This Fall

Big Event? Always Wear-Test

If you’ve ever pulled out a jacket or suit before a wedding or ceremony only to find that it doesn’t fit well or isn’t tailored correctly, you probably learned this trick the hard way. Reid suggests that before any notable event—or any time you need to look your best—to wear your planned outfit well in advance.

“When Sean Connery landed the role as 007, he knew he’d be wearing one gray suit a lot, so for weeks before filming he wore it every day. Apparently he even slept in it,” Reid says. “That’s why he looked so relaxed and confident in the film.”

To that end, Reid outfitted Daniel Craig with his iconic peacoats for Skyfall and made the delivery weeks early so Craig could live in them before filming.

Wear-testing will also help you realize if the finer tailoring details—cuffs, hems, length—need tweaking. Shoot to have your look three weeks before the big event and wear it at least twice so your look will say you know how to own a room.

billy-reid-shindig
Courtesy image

Less Fabric is More Flattering

Tailoring is a specialty of Reid’s, and he knows how the right cut can make you look fit—or fat. To trim down your silhouette, he suggests using less fabric whenever possible. For tops, this means band collars for formal events and Henleys for something more casual.

“Removing a collar makes your neck look longer and creates a slimming effect,” he says. “It’s a trick women use often, but it can be translated into menswear, too.”

The same goes for your pant width. A baggier fit—unless that’s the intended effect—can make your bottom half look heavy, especially in photos.

“On ESPN, the sportscasters often wear slimmer-cut pants that are cut like jeans, because they want that slimmer leg.”


All the Cool, Casual Style Essentials You Need for City Living

Achieve this same look by opting for slim-fit pants—even on bigger guys. Having no more than 2 to 3 inches of excess fabric at your leg when standing is the perfect way to make your overall shape look slimmer in a flash.

I love accessories. I think men need them. But stick with just one.

Mind Your Proportions

Just as the width of your clothes is essential, so is the length.

“Wearing a jacket that’s too long can weigh you down,” Reid says.

It’s essential to find your own just-right jacket length to even out your proportions. Reid wears his jacket a bit shorter than a typical off-the-rack jacket in his size, but it took him a while to figure out what worked best for him.

The old-school trick is to cup your fingers against your palms to find the spot where your jacket should hit. “It’s not so scientific, but it’ll give you a feel for what’s right.”

For the best results, Reid recommends working with your tailor to experiment with different lengths and find the one that’s right for you.

“Once you train your mind to see the small differences, you’ll start noticing it with all your clothes, and you’ll look better for it.”

The post Designer Billy Reid on How to Look Fit and the One Thing Every Guy Should Do Before a Big Event appeared first on Men's Journal.

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

The Essential Billy Joel – Billy Joel

Billy Joel - The Essential Billy Joel  artwork

The Essential Billy Joel

Billy Joel

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 14.99

Release Date: October 2, 2001

© ℗ This compilation (P) 2001 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Trippie Redd ft. Lil Baby & Lil Duke “Mac 10,” Billy Danze “Gone Fishing” & More | Daily Visuals 7.24.19

Wireless Festival 2019

Source: Lorne Thomson / Getty

Well it seems like Trippie Redd done won the longstanding rivalry with Tekashi 6ix9ine. Given Tekashi did it to himself what with all the snitching he did after getting himself locked up for documenting his own boneheaded criminal activities. Still, Trippie’s out here making records and 69’s not.

Today the Canton, Ohio crooner/rapper comes through with his latest clip for the Lil Baby and Lil Duke assisted clip to “Mac 10” in which Trippie and company recreate the cult classic Scarface with Trippie Montana and ‘em going to war with the opposition and coming out on top of the world.

Back in Brooklyn M.O.P.’s Billy Danze goes the solo route for a minute and in his visual to “Gone Fishing” sits on his own throne before taking an unwilling party to the lake to get familiar with the fishes. Don’t beef with that man, b.

Check out the rest of today’s drops including work from Salaam Remi and Bodega Bamz, NLE Choppa, and more.

TRIPPIE REDD FT. LIL BABY & LIL DUKE – “MAC 10”

BILLY DANZE – “GONE FISHING”

SALAAM REMI & BODEGA BAMZ – “BODEGA’S WAY”

INFINITE MARVELOUS – “COMPUTER CHIPS”

NLE CHOPPA – “SHOTTA FLOW 3”

DA GREAT APE – “DREAMS OF A DOPE BOY”

IDK – “24”

YUNG BANS – “GOING WILD”

ZAEHD & CEO – “BASS BOOMIN”

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

The Lost Weekend (1945) – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - The Lost Weekend (1945)  artwork

The Lost Weekend (1945)

Billy Wilder

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: November 16, 1945


The Best Picture of 1945 has lost none of its bite or power in this uncompromising look at the devastating effects of alcoholism. Ironically, this brilliant Billy Wilder film was almost never released because of poor reaction by preview audiences unaccustomed to such stark realism from Hollywood, but the film has since gone on to be regarded as one of the all-time great dramas in movie history. Ray Milland's haunting portrayal of a would-be writer's dissatisfaction with his life leads him on a self-destructive three-day binge. Filled with riveting imagery, the multiple Academy Award®-winner offers an unforgettable view of life on the edge.

© © 1945 Paramount Pictures Inc. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

Billy Ray Cyrus Celebrates 11 Weeks at #1 with Stevie Wonder Shout-Out

[[tmz:video id=”0_age567vb”]] Billy Ray Cyrus took a break from basking in the glory of his collab with Lil Nas X to give one of his heroes a major shout out … Stevie Wonder!!! We got Billy Ray at LAX and he couldn’t stop grinning from ear to…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Music


Billy Joel, A Matter of Trust: The Bridge to Russia – a Documentary Film – Jim Brown

Jim Brown - Billy Joel, A Matter of Trust: The Bridge to Russia – a Documentary Film  artwork

Billy Joel, A Matter of Trust: The Bridge to Russia – a Documentary Film

Jim Brown

Genre: Documentary

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: May 20, 2014


In July-August 1987, after 100 shows around the world on The Bridge Tour, Billy Joel accepted the Kremlin’s invitation to the U.S.S.R. for six fully-staged rock shows in Moscow and Leningrad, fulfilling a long-time desire to perform in Russia. During their stay, Billy and his family, along with musicians, staff, and a huge press entourage spent their days interacting with the Russian people, forging true bonds of friendship wherever they went. For the first time A Matter Of Trust – The Bridge To Russia: A Documentary presents an expanded version of what fans saw and heard over a quarter-century ago. The brand-new 90-minute film takes a fresh look at the groundbreaking trip, painstakingly incorporating some of the documentary material from 1988, both released and unreleased. But the heart and soul of this new film comprises up-to-date interviews with nearly 20 U.S. and Russian participants, including Billy, Christie Brinkley, band musicians, crew, and many others. There is a passion and intimacy to their interviews that underscores the historical significance of what these fellow travelers all witnessed, and the warmth that the Russian people showered on them. Billy has always considered that going to Russia was the most important thing he’d ever done as a performer. The freedom and excitement of his presence permanently affected the country and played a role in the ultimate dissolution of the U.S.S.R. in 1991. This new deluxe box set A Matter Of Trust – The Bridge To Russia also includes newly commissioned essays and previously unseen photography.

© © 2013 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Stalag 17 – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - Stalag 17  artwork

Stalag 17

Billy Wilder

Genre: Classics

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: April 1, 1958


Two worthy Academy Award® nominees from 1950's Sunset Boulevard – actor William Holden and director Billy Wilder – reteamed three years later for the gripping World War II drama, Stalag 17. The result was another Best Director nomination for Wilder (his fourth), and the elusive Best Actor Oscar® for Holden. Holden portrays the jaded, scheming Sergeant J.J. Sefton, a prisoner at the notorious German prison camp, who spends his days dreaming up rackets and trading with the Germans for special privileges. But when two prisoners are killed in an escape attempt, it becomes obvious that there is a spy among the prisoners. Is it Sefton? Famed producer/director Otto Preminger tackles a rare acting role as the camp's commandant; actor Robert Strauss won a Supporting Actor nomination for his role as "Animal."

© © 1952 Paramount Pictures

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Action & Adventure

DJ Khaled ft. SZA “Just Us,” Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road” & More | Daily Visuals 5.17.19

Lil Nas X

Source: Lil Nas X / Columbia Records

At the stroke of midnight of May 17, DJ Khaled released his latest star studded album Father of Asahd and with it came two new videos, the highly anticipated Nipsey Hussle & John Legend assisted “Higher,” and the SZA featured “Just Us.”

While “Higher” was moving viewers to tears with Nipsey living and breathing in his old hood in LA, the SZA starring “Just Us” will surely give heads an adrenaline rush as she gets her 300 on and slices and dices her foes in a 480 B.C. battlefield. Khaled meanwhile was enjoying the life of a king and finds himself laying with many women. Once again a woman saves the day.

Lil Nas X meanwhile finally brings life into the remix of his surprise hit “Old Town Road” and in the celebrity filled comedic clip to the Billy Ray Cyrus featured song finds himself as a cowboy from the 1800’s making his way to 2019 via a wormhole. Pretty entertaining joint.

Check out the rest of today’s drops including work from Young Dolph, Polo G, and more.

DJ KHALED FT. SZA – “JUST US”

LIL NAS X FT. BILLY RAY CYRUS – “OLD TOWN ROAD REMIX”

BIRDMAN & JUVENILE – “BROKE”

YOUNG DOLPH – “CRASHIN’ OUT”

POLO G – “DEEP WOUNDS”

OPEN MIKE EAGLE & FATHER – “LIT”

YUNA FT. G-EAZY – “BLANK MARQUEE”

LEBRAA DEVILLE – “T UP”

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

Double Indemnity – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - Double Indemnity  artwork

Double Indemnity

Billy Wilder

Genre: Thriller

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: April 24, 1944


Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray star in this gripping film noir from Academy Award®-winning director Billy Wilder. A calculating wife encourages her wealthy husband to sign a double indemnity policy proposed by smitten insurance agent Walter Neff. As the would-be lovers plot the unsuspecting husband's murder, they are pursued by a suspicious claims manager (Edward G. Robinson). It's a race against time to get away with the perfect crime in this heart-racing Academy Award®-nominated masterpiece.

© © 1944 Paramount Pictures Inc. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

The Very Best of Billy Dean – Billy Dean

Billy Dean - The Very Best of Billy Dean  artwork

The Very Best of Billy Dean

Billy Dean

Genre: Country

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: March 29, 2005

© This Compilation ℗ 2005 Capitol Records Nashville

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Country

A Billy Graham Music Homecoming, Volume Two – Bill & Gloria Gaither, Andraé Crouch, Guy Penrod, CeCe Winans, Jake Hess, George Beverly Shea, Buddy Greene, Evie Karlsson, Wesley Pritchard, David Phelps, Avalon, Russ Taff, The Martins, Joy Gardner, The Talleys, Michael W. Smith, Vestal Goodman & George Younce

Bill & Gloria Gaither, Andraé Crouch, Guy Penrod, CeCe Winans, Jake Hess, George Beverly Shea, Buddy Greene, Evie Karlsson, Wesley Pritchard, David Phelps, Avalon, Russ Taff, The Martins, Joy Gardner, The Talleys, Michael W. Smith, Vestal Goodman & George Younce - A Billy Graham Music Homecoming, Volume Two  artwork

A Billy Graham Music Homecoming, Volume Two

Bill & Gloria Gaither, Andraé Crouch, Guy Penrod, CeCe Winans, Jake Hess, George Beverly Shea, Buddy Greene, Evie Karlsson, Wesley Pritchard, David Phelps, Avalon, Russ Taff, The Martins, Joy Gardner, The Talleys, Michael W. Smith, Vestal Goodman & George Younce

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: January 1, 2001


The artists of the Billy Graham Crusades come together to sing the music and share incredible stories. George Beverly Shea, Cliff Barrows and Franklin Graham share unforgettable moments in the history of the ministry. Bill & Gloria Gaither, Michael W. Smith, CeCe Winans, Andrae' Crouch, Avalon and others lead the group in emotion-filled songs and testimonies of God's faithfulness.

© © 2001 Spring House Productions, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Billy Porter Rocks a Tuxedo-Gown During Oscars’ Red Carpet

The Oscars are about to get underway, but heads are already turning for Billy Porter on the red carpet … who’s wearing a tuxedo-gown to this year’s award show. The Broadway performer and gender-fluid artist showed up Sunday wearing a velvet outfit…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Fashion


Billy Eichner & Cobie Smulders Answer the Web’s Most Searched Questions

“Friends from College” stars Billy Eichner & Cobie Smulders take the WIRED Autocomplete Interview and answer the internet’s most searched questions about themselves. What’s Cobie’s real name? How tall is Billy Eichner? Is Cobie Smulders Canadian?

FRIENDS FROM COLLEGE is now streaming on Netflix
WIRED Videos

Billy Budd, foretopman – Herman Melville

Herman Melville - Billy Budd, foretopman  artwork

Billy Budd, foretopman

Herman Melville

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: January 1, 1924

Publisher: University of Oxford

Seller: Oxford University Computing Services


Billy Budd, foretopman, Herman Melville. Revised version of http://ota.ox.ac.uk/id/2185 .

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

Some Like It Hot – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - Some Like It Hot  artwork

Some Like It Hot

Billy Wilder

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: March 21, 1959


Two musicians, Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon), are thrown out of work when the speakeasy they performed in-owned by mob boss Spats Columbo (George Raft)-is raided by Prohibition agent Mulligan (Pat O'Brien) and closed. Finally, after three long weeks of unemployment, Joe and Jerry get a gig in Urbana. But first they must get their car out of hock…at the garage chosen by the mob for the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Hiding behind their car, Joe and Jerry witness the whole thing. Targeted for extinction, Joe and Jerry never show their faces again. There is an opening for a saxophonist and a bass player in an orchestra managed by one Sweet Sue (Joan Shawlee)…an all-woman orchestra. They get the job! On the way to Florida, they meet Sweet Sue's lead singer, Sugar Kane (Marilyn Monroe.

© © METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Comedy

Greatest Hits – Billy Idol

Billy Idol - Greatest Hits  artwork

Greatest Hits

Billy Idol

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: March 27, 2001

© This Compilation ℗ 2001 Capitol Records Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

The Apartment (1960) – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - The Apartment (1960)  artwork

The Apartment (1960)

Billy Wilder

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 0.99

Release Date: July 2, 1960


Winner of five 1960 Academy Awards including Best Picture, The Apartment is legendary writer/director Billy Wilder at his scathing, satirical best, and one of "the finest comedies Hollywood has turned out" (Newsweek). C.C. "Bud" Baxter (Jack Lemmon) knows the way to success in business…it's through the door of his apartment! By providing a perfect hideaway for philandering bosses, he reaps a series of undeserved promotions. But when Bud lends the key to big boss J.D. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray), he not only advances his career, but his own love life as well. For Sheldrake's mistress is the lovely Fran Kubelik (Shirley MacLaine), the elevator girl of Bud's dreams. Convinced that he is the only man for Fran, Bud must make the most important executive decision of his career: lose the girl…or his job.

© © 1960 METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC.

iTunes Store: Top Video Rentals in Romance

Breach – Billy Ray

Billy Ray - Breach  artwork

Breach

Billy Ray

Genre: Thriller

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: February 16, 2007


Inspired by the incredible true story of the greatest security breach in U.S. intelligence history, Breach is a spellbinding thriller starring Academy Award® winner Chris Cooper, Ryan Phillippe, Academy Award® nominee Laura Linney and Dennis Haysbert. Eric O'Neill (Phillippe) is assigned to work with renowned operative Robert Hanssen (Cooper), the sole subject of a long-term, top-secret investigation. Determined to draw this suspected double-agent out of deep cover, O'Neill finds himself in a lethal game of spy vs. spy, where nothing is as it seems. Critics are hailing Breach as "electrifying" (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone) and "suspenseful" (Ty Burr, The Boston Globe).

© © 2006 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

The Friars Club honors Billy Crystal

The veteran comedian receives the Entertainer Icon Award from the historic organization. Rough Cut (no reporter narration)


Reuters Video: Entertainment

Find your Soulmate Live webcam chat!

Billy Idol Sued By Woman Claiming He Stood Her Up

Billy Idol doesn’t know how to be a lover … this according to a woman suing him for allegedly inviting her to his concert and a hotel rendezvous afterward, but instead just ditching her.  Juliana Berg claims Billy invited her to a…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Celebrity Justice


Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust – The Bridge To Russia the Concert – Billy Joel

Billy Joel - Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust - The Bridge To Russia the Concert  artwork

Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust – The Bridge To Russia the Concert

Billy Joel

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: May 20, 2014


In July-August 1987, after 100 shows around the world on The Bridge Tour, Billy Joel accepted the Kremlin’s invitation to the U.S.S.R. for six fully-staged rock shows in Moscow and Leningrad, fulfilling a long-time desire to perform in Russia. During their stay, Billy and his family, along with musicians, staff, and a huge press entourage spent their days interacting with the Russian people, forging true bonds of friendship wherever they went. For the first time, A Matter Of Trust – The Bridge To Russia: The Concert presents an expanded version of what fans saw and heard over a quarter-century ago. The newly remastered concert film, originally directed by Wayne Isham, adds seven previously unreleased songs to the original 1987 VHS release Live From Leningrad, including a bonus performance of “Pressure.” The performances have been completely remasterd from the original 35 millimeter negatives for the best audiovisual quality. Billy has always believed that going to Russia was the most important thing he’d ever done as a performer. The freedom and excitement of his presence permanently affected the country and played a role in the ultimate dissolution of the U.S.S.R. in 1991.

© © 2013 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

The Adventures of Sgt. Billy & Corp. Sam, Vol. 2 (Original Recording) – Jerry Robbins

Jerry Robbins - The Adventures of Sgt. Billy & Corp. Sam, Vol. 2 (Original Recording)  artwork

The Adventures of Sgt. Billy & Corp. Sam, Vol. 2 (Original Recording)

Jerry Robbins

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 5.95

Publish Date: September 13, 2018

© ℗ © 2018 The Colonial Radio Theatre on the Air

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

The Big Bad Blues – Billy F Gibbons

Billy F Gibbons - The Big Bad Blues  artwork

The Big Bad Blues

Billy F Gibbons

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: September 21, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Concord Records, a division of Concord Music Group, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Opie & Anthony, Billy Idol, Chelsea Handler, Jim Florentine Joe Perry, And Ron Bennington, October 8, 2014 – Opie & Anthony

Opie & Anthony - Opie & Anthony, Billy Idol, Chelsea Handler, Jim Florentine Joe Perry, And Ron Bennington, October 8, 2014  artwork

Opie & Anthony, Billy Idol, Chelsea Handler, Jim Florentine Joe Perry, And Ron Bennington, October 8, 2014

Opie & Anthony

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 2.95

Publish Date: October 8, 2014

© ℗ © 2014 XM Satellite Radio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Sabrina (1954) – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - Sabrina (1954)  artwork

Sabrina (1954)

Billy Wilder

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 6.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: September 22, 1954


Isn't it romantic…Sabrina is charming, humorous and aglow with some of Hollywood's greatest stars. Humphrey Bogart, William Holden and Audrey Hepburn star in a Cinderella story directed by renowned filmmaker Billy Wilder (Sunset Boulevard, Some Like It Hot). Bogie and Holden are the mega-rich Larrabee brothers of Long Island. Bogie's all work, Holden's all playboy. But when Sabrina, daughter of the family's chauffeur, returns from Paris all grown up and glamorous, the stage is set for some family fireworks as the brothers fall under the spell of Hepburn's delightful charms.

© © TM & Copyright 2007 by Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Comedy

Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 & 2 – Billy Joel

Billy Joel - Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 & 2  artwork

Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 & 2

Billy Joel

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 14.99

Release Date: September 2, 1985

© ℗ This compilation (P) 1985 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Espresso (feat. Billy Kilson & Michael Palazzolo) – Bob James

Bob James - Espresso (feat. Billy Kilson & Michael Palazzolo)  artwork

Espresso (feat. Billy Kilson & Michael Palazzolo)

Bob James

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 10.99

Release Date: August 31, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Evolution Ltd. under exclusive license from Tappan Zee Records

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

Bernstein Century – Copland: Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (Billy The Kid) – Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic

Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic - Bernstein Century - Copland: Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (Billy The Kid)  artwork

Bernstein Century – Copland: Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (Billy The Kid)

Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: January 1, 1997

© ℗ Originally released 1960, 1962, 1967 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT (P) 1992 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Billy Idol: In Super Overdrive – Live – Billy Idol

Billy Idol - Billy Idol: In Super Overdrive - Live  artwork

Billy Idol: In Super Overdrive – Live

Billy Idol

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: January 1, 2009


"In Super Overdrive Live" was filmed at the Congress Theater, Chicago for the US TV series Soundstage and originally broadcast in America in July 2009. The show sees Billy Idol, with trademark sneer and peroxide hair very much to the fore, reunited with guitarist Steve Stevens, who played on (& sometimes co-wrote) all his eighties hits. The tracklist runs from early Generation X favourites, through his classic solo singles and up to tracks from his most recent album "The Devil's Playground". Idol is a fantastic live performer who oozes onstage charisma and the audience rocks along to every minute of this mesmerising concert.

© © 2009 Cyber Corps, Inc./HD Ready, LLC. Under License To Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Every Piece From Golfer Billy Horschel’s Ralph Lauren Collaboration

The Ralph Lauren brand was founded over 50 years ago, but even now, it’s still reaching new milestones. The company marked its first-ever collaboration with an athlete by partnering with PGA Tour golfer Billy Horschel on a new collection.

The post Every Piece From Golfer Billy Horschel’s Ralph Lauren Collaboration appeared first on Men's Journal.

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

The Hits – Billy Joel

Billy Joel - The Hits  artwork

The Hits

Billy Joel

Genre: Pop

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: November 16, 2010

© ℗ 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1989, 1993 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Pop

John Stamos’s Wife Caitlin McHugh Gives Birth to Baby Boy Named Billy

John Stamos, Caitlin McHugh, Disney World, InstagramIt’s a boy!
Late Sunday evening, Full House star John Stamos shared the exciting news that he and wife Caitlin McHugh welcomed their first child, a baby boy named Billy.
The…


E! Online (US) – Top Stories
Entertainment News! –

Explore the world of Hustler today! Click now and enjoy…

Explore REAL today for the most erotic amateur sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Visit VCAXX Classics for the classics in adult entertainment at its best! Click now!

Hustler Taboo features the kinkiest sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Safaree “Hunnid,” Curren$y “Billy Ocean” & More | Daily Visuals 3.8.18

Source: Photo: Instagram

For the past week and change Safaree’s been on the mind of every woman with an unquenched thirst thanks to some leaked nudes. Today he pounces on his buzz.

Coming through with a clip for his club lighter “Hunnid,” the Brooklyn rapper walking from Times Square to the burb talkin’ that ish. Safaree should’ve really capitalized on the current thirst and went the D’Angelo “How Does It Feel” route for this video. Women would’ve really been going crazy for that.

Curren$ y meanwhile continues to flaunt his love affair with big boy toys and some hot wheels in his clip for “Billy Ocean.”

Check out the rest of today’s drops including work from Huey P featuring Dave East, Sosamann, and more.

SAFAREE – “HUNNID”

CURREN$ Y – “BILLY OCEAN”

HUEY P FT. DAVE EAST – “TALKIN TO GOD”

SOSAMANN – “GOOD DAY”

CAMILA CABELLO – “NEVER BE THE SAME”

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

Voices in My Head: A Percussive Collection – Billy Hawn

Billy Hawn - Voices in My Head: A Percussive Collection  artwork

Voices in My Head: A Percussive Collection

Billy Hawn

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: February 1, 2008

© ℗ 2008 Rhythm For Water

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Shattered Glass – Billy Ray

Billy Ray - Shattered Glass  artwork

Shattered Glass

Billy Ray

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 5.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: March 23, 2004


Hayden Christensen stars in this critically acclaimed story of a disgraced journalist, directed and co-written by Billy Ray, Oscar®- nominated writer of CAPTAIN PHILLIPS. When renowned journalist Stephen Glass (Christensen) suddenly comes under investigation by a Forbes.com reporter (Steve Zahn), the search reveals Glass has fabricated many of his sensational stories, leading to his ultimate downfall in this gripping, fact-based drama.

© © MMIII Lions Gate Films, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

Billy Elliot – Stephen Daldry

Stephen Daldry - Billy Elliot  artwork

Billy Elliot

Stephen Daldry

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: September 29, 2000


"Two Thumbs Up!" rave Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper, Ebert & Roeper and the Movies. Billy Elliot is the heartwarming story of a young boy from a working-class family who discovers a passion that will change his life forever. Eleven-year-old miner's son Billy Elliot is on his way to boxing lessons when he stumbles upon a ballet class. Billy secretly joins the class, knowing that his blue-collar family would never understand. Under the guidance of his teacher, Mrs. Wilkinson (Academy Award® nominee Julie Walters), Billy's raw talent takes flight. But when his father discovers his son's ambition, Billy must fight for his dreams and his destiny. With Oscar®-worthy performances, Rex Reed (The New York Observer) calls "a triumph!" Don't miss Billy Elliot – the triumphant tale of one boy who reaches beyond his place in the world to follow his heart's desire.

© © 2000 Tiger Aspect Pictures Ltd. 2000 and 2000 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Comedy

Billy Reid Just Released Fall’s Best New Sunglasses

Not long ago, Billy Reid was helping his wife Jeanne with a renovation project when a door fell and hit him on the side of the head. Fortunately, his trademark Paul Smith glasses, (which, as a guy who suffers from both myopia and an astigmatism, Reid had worn every day for almost 20 years) were there to break the fall. Unfortunately, the frames were damaged so severely that, unlike his head, they couldn’t be repaired.

The post Billy Reid Just Released Fall’s Best New Sunglasses appeared first on Men's Journal.

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

The Essential Billy Joel – Billy Joel

Billy Joel - The Essential Billy Joel  artwork

The Essential Billy Joel

Billy Joel

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: October 2, 2001

© ℗ This compilation (P) 2001 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Jimmy Kimmel Makes Emotional Return to Late Night With Baby Billy

Jimmy Kimmel, Baby Billy Jimmy Kimmel is returning to late-night television with a special message.
One week after his son had his second open-heart surgery, the Jimmy Kimmel Live! host joined baby Billy on stage…


E! Online (US) – Top Stories
Entertainment News! –

Explore the world of Hustler today! Click now and enjoy…

Explore REAL today for the most erotic amateur sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Visit VCAXX Classics for the classics in adult entertainment at its best! Click now!

Hustler Taboo features the kinkiest sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Billy Reid Just Released Fall’s Best New Sunglasses

Not long ago, Billy Reid was helping his wife Jeanne with a renovation project when a door fell and hit

This article originally appeared on www.mensjournal.com: Billy Reid Just Released Fall’s Best New Sunglasses

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

‘America’s Got Talent’ Stars Emily & Billy England Wow With Performance

“America’s Got Talent” skating contestants Emily and Billy England join Access Hollywood’s Natalie Morales, Kit Hoover and Scott Evans to show off their talents on the AHL stage! See their incredible skating performance.


Access Hollywood Latest Videos

Billy Joel imitates Springsteen, performs ‘Miami 2017’ on ‘Kimmel’

Billy Joel visited 'Jimmy Kimmel Live' Thursday in Brooklyn, with the singer impersonating Bruce Springsteen and performing during the episode.
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

Billy Porter Presents: The Soul of Richard Rodgers – Billy Porter

Billy Porter - Billy Porter Presents: The Soul of Richard Rodgers  artwork

Billy Porter Presents: The Soul of Richard Rodgers

Billy Porter

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: April 7, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

Songs We Love: Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy With The Roots Of Music, ‘The Curse’

A still from Bonnie "Prince" Billy

Pan-generational brass bands join this joyous, weird trip through New Orleans cemeteries and streets, with cameos from stalwarts of local street culture.

(Image credit: YouTube)


Rock : NPR

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Click and Enjoy!

Billy Bush Will Not Anchor New Fox Show, Despite Reports

Billy Bush is still unemployed, despite stories he’s got a new TV gig. There’s a report out Billy is set to anchor a new Fox syndicated show, “Top 30,” which debuts this Fall. We checked with Fox, and they told us unequivocally, Billy’s not the host ……

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Gossip Rumors


Billy Madison – Tamra Davis

Tamra Davis - Billy Madison  artwork

Billy Madison

Tamra Davis

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: January 1, 1995


Adam Sandler stars as Billy Madison in the outrageous comedy where the subject is always fun. 27-year-old Billy Madison must repeat all 12 grades of school – in just 24 weeks – to earn his father’s respect and prove he has what it takes to run the family’s multi-million dollar empire. Along the way, Billy falls for his 3rd grade teacher (Bridgette Wilson), gets kicked out of school and must face-off with his nemesis…not to mention a pesky penguin. With hilarious appearances by Chris Farley, Norm MacDonald and Steve Buscemi, this comedy hit gets an A+ for laughs!

© © 1994 Universal City Studios, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Comedy

Sunset Boulevard (1950) – Billy Wilder

Billy Wilder - Sunset Boulevard (1950)  artwork

Sunset Boulevard (1950)

Billy Wilder

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: August 4, 1950


Gloria Swanson, as Norma Desmond, an aging silent-film queen, and William Holden, as the struggling young screenwriter who is held in thrall by her madness, created two of the screen's most memorable characters in "Sunset Boulevard." Winner of three Academy Awards®, director Billy Wilder's powerful orchestration of the bizarre tale is a true cinematic classic. From the unforgettable opening sequence — a body found floating in a decayed mansion's swimming pool — through the inevitable unfolding of tragic destiny, "Sunset Boulevard" is the definitive statement on the dark and desperate side of Hollywood. Erich von Stroheim as Desmond's discoverer, ex-husband and butler, and Nancy Olson as the bright spot amidst unrelenting ominousness, are equally celebrated for their masterful performances.

© © 1950 by Paramount Pictures; Renewed 1978. All Rights Reserved.TM & 2008 by Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

Greatest Hits – Billy Joe Royal

Billy Joe Royal - Greatest Hits  artwork

Greatest Hits

Billy Joe Royal

Genre: Country

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: January 29, 1991

© ℗ 1991 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Country

Billy Ray Cyrus: I Just Want Miley To Have Fun & Be Happy

Billy Ray Cyrus tells Access’ Liz Hernandez about his wishes for his daughter, Miley, who hosted the 2015 MTV VMAs.


Access Hollywood Latest Videos

Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust – The Bridge To Russia the Concert – Billy Joel

Billy Joel - Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust - The Bridge To Russia the Concert  artwork

Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust – The Bridge To Russia the Concert

Billy Joel

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: May 20, 2014


In July-August 1987, after 100 shows around the world on The Bridge Tour, Billy Joel accepted the Kremlin’s invitation to the U.S.S.R. for six fully-staged rock shows in Moscow and Leningrad, fulfilling a long-time desire to perform in Russia. During their stay, Billy and his family, along with musicians, staff, and a huge press entourage spent their days interacting with the Russian people, forging true bonds of friendship wherever they went. For the first time, A Matter Of Trust – The Bridge To Russia: The Concert presents an expanded version of what fans saw and heard over a quarter-century ago. The newly remastered concert film, originally directed by Wayne Isham, adds seven previously unreleased songs to the original 1987 VHS release Live From Leningrad, including a bonus performance of “Pressure.” The performances have been completely remasterd from the original 35 millimeter negatives for the best audiovisual quality. Billy has always believed that going to Russia was the most important thing he’d ever done as a performer. The freedom and excitement of his presence permanently affected the country and played a role in the ultimate dissolution of the U.S.S.R. in 1991.

© © 2013 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Designer Billy Reid Gives Us A Reason To Visit Alabama Next Weekend


Fashion and music fans won’t want to miss his Shindig No. 7.

read more



Style

First Photo Of Billy Joel’s New Daughter Della Rose Unveiled

Billy Joel and his new wife Alexis have announced the birth of their daughter Della Rose, born on August 12 and weighing in at 7 lbs. 6 oz. A source told People that Joel is “thrilled to become a dad again.” “Thank you for all the love! She’s absolutely perfect! Busy, busy, here at the Joel home but I wanted to share a pic. Love, Alexis,” Joel’s wife said.
RTT – Music
Webcam Performers Wanted – Earn $ 100,000 per year!

Models Wanted
Promo Live Chat

Billy Joel’s A Dad Again!

Billy Joel’s in a baby state of mind! On Wednesday, August 12, the 66-year-old and his wife lovely Alexis Roderick welcomed their first child together, a bouncing baby girl by the name of Della Rose Joel. The couples little bundle of joy was born weighing 7 pounds 6.5 ounces. Unfortunately, Billy or Alexis haven’t revealed a pic of the little cutie pie, but we are anxious to meet her. Check out the video here to get all the details on Billy Joel’s baby girl.
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

Closer to God – Billy Senese

Billy Senese - Closer to God  artwork

Closer to God

Billy Senese

Genre: Horror

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: July 3, 2015


In this dark, gritty sci-fi thriller, a brilliant scientist achieves a radical breakthrough by cloning the first human being. This ignites a massive public outcry, and he finds himself in the middle of an ethical, legal, and religious firestorm. But an even greater threat looms – a horrific failure from the doctor's past that can no longer be kept hidden.

© © 2014 Closer to God, LLC

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Horror

See the First Photo of Billy Joel’s Baby Girl

Billy Joel and wife Alexis welcomed their first baby together this week and now here’s is your first look at Della Rose Joel. Yes, Billy’s little girl is adorable isn’t she?! Beautiful just like her name! This is Billy and Alexis’s first child together after their spontaneous wedding ceremony in July. Della is Billy’s second daughter. He has a 29 year old daughter, Alexa, with ex-wife Christie Brinkley.
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

Billy Vincent – Stand On Me – Deepdive

As a relatively new band they have space to make their visions work, they aren’t trapped into any genre or subject, and the album brims over with good songs and ideas.
Music-News.com RSS feed
Chat Live!
Join Group Chat!

Billy Joel, A Matter of Trust: The Bridge to Russia – a Documentary Film – Jim Brown

Jim Brown - Billy Joel, A Matter of Trust: The Bridge to Russia – a Documentary Film  artwork

Billy Joel, A Matter of Trust: The Bridge to Russia – a Documentary Film

Jim Brown

Genre: Documentary

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: May 20, 2014


In July-August 1987, after 100 shows around the world on The Bridge Tour, Billy Joel accepted the Kremlin’s invitation to the U.S.S.R. for six fully-staged rock shows in Moscow and Leningrad, fulfilling a long-time desire to perform in Russia. During their stay, Billy and his family, along with musicians, staff, and a huge press entourage spent their days interacting with the Russian people, forging true bonds of friendship wherever they went. For the first time A Matter Of Trust – The Bridge To Russia: A Documentary presents an expanded version of what fans saw and heard over a quarter-century ago. The brand-new 90-minute film takes a fresh look at the groundbreaking trip, painstakingly incorporating some of the documentary material from 1988, both released and unreleased. But the heart and soul of this new film comprises up-to-date interviews with nearly 20 U.S. and Russian participants, including Billy, Christie Brinkley, band musicians, crew, and many others. There is a passion and intimacy to their interviews that underscores the historical significance of what these fellow travelers all witnessed, and the warmth that the Russian people showered on them. Billy has always considered that going to Russia was the most important thing he’d ever done as a performer. The freedom and excitement of his presence permanently affected the country and played a role in the ultimate dissolution of the U.S.S.R. in 1991. This new deluxe box set A Matter Of Trust – The Bridge To Russia also includes newly commissioned essays and previously unseen photography.

© © 2013 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

When Mockingbirds Sing – Billy Coffey

Billy Coffey - When Mockingbirds Sing  artwork

When Mockingbirds Sing

Billy Coffey

Genre: Literary

Publish Date: June 11, 2013

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

Seller: HarperCollins


What marks the boundary between a miracle from God and the imagination of a child? Leah is a child from Away, isolated from her peers because of her stutter. But then she begins painting scenes that are epic in scope, brilliant in detail, and suffused with rich, prophetic imagery. When the event foreshadowed in the first painting dramatically comes true, the town of Mattingly takes notice. Leah attributes her ability to foretell the future to an invisible friend she calls the Rainbow Man. Some of the townsfolk are enchanted with her. Others fear her. But there is one thing they all agree onùthere is no such thing as the Rainbow Man. Her father, the town psychologist, is falling apart over his inability to heal his daughter . . . or fix his marriage. And the town minister is unraveled by the notion that a mere child with no formal training may be hearing from God more clearly than he does. While the town bickers over what to do with this strange child, the content of Leah's paintings grows darker. Still, Leah insists that the Rainbow Man's heart is pure. But then a dramatic and tragic turn of events leaves the town reeling and places everyone's lives in danger. Now the people of Mattingly face a single choice: Will they cling to what they know . . . or embrace the things Leah believes in that cannot be seen? Billy Coffey is a minstrel who writes with intense depth of feeling and vibrant rich description. Robert Whitlow, best-selling author of The Choice

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

Michael McDonald: Live – Toni Braxton, India Arie, Take 6, Billy Preston, Ashford & Simpson, Tom Johnston & Patrick Simmons

Toni Braxton, India Arie, Take 6, Billy Preston, Ashford & Simpson, Tom Johnston & Patrick Simmons - Michael McDonald: Live  artwork

Michael McDonald: Live

Toni Braxton, India Arie, Take 6, Billy Preston, Ashford & Simpson, Tom Johnston & Patrick Simmons

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: October 4, 2011


Michael McDonald is joined by Doobie Brothers Tom Johnston and Patrick Simmons for an evening performing his solo hits, including songs from his hit Motown album as well as Doobie classics What a Fool Believes and Taking It to the Streets. Special guests Ashford and Simpson appear to perform their hits Aint No Mountain High Enough and Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing. Songs: It Keeps You Runnin', Sweet Freedom, I Keep Forgettin', I Heard It Through the Grapevine, Ain't No Mountain High Enough, Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing, Black Water, Take Me in Your Arms (Rock Me a Little While), Minute by Minute, What a Fool Believes, Takin' It to the Streets. MICHAEL MCDONALD: A TRIBUTE TO MOTOWN: Michael McDonald along with special guests Toni Braxton, India.Arie, Take 6 and Billy Preston perform 14 classic songs from his best-selling Motown concept albums and revives some of the most influential American music ever made. Songs: I Second That Emotion, I Was Made to Love Her, What’s Going On, I Heard It Through the Grapevine, All in Love Is Fair, Stop Look Listen (To Your Heart), Baby I’m for Real, Tracks of My Tears, Since I Lost My Baby, Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever, You’re All I Need to Get By, Ain’t No Mountain High Enough, Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing, Nowhere to Run.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Misha, Sasha, Billy

Sasha and Misha are two sexy London ladies who have the hottest accents in the world, along with the highest sex drives. These babes might have wanted to go after each other at first, and do manage to get some great slit licking in, but they end up turning their attentions to Billy before long. The ladies are going to go right for his shlong, passing it back and forth like a candybar before they decide who is going to end up taking the banging first, and who needs to wait her turn. It’s a rather delicious ride to watch.

Hardcore Porn

Billy Idol: In Super Overdrive – Live – Billy Idol

Billy Idol - Billy Idol: In Super Overdrive - Live  artwork

Billy Idol: In Super Overdrive – Live

Billy Idol

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: January 1, 2009


"In Super Overdrive Live" was filmed at the Congress Theater, Chicago for the US TV series Soundstage and originally broadcast in America in July 2009. The show sees Billy Idol, with trademark sneer and peroxide hair very much to the fore, reunited with guitarist Steve Stevens, who played on (& sometimes co-wrote) all his eighties hits. The tracklist runs from early Generation X favourites, through his classic solo singles and up to tracks from his most recent album "The Devil's Playground". Idol is a fantastic live performer who oozes onstage charisma and the audience rocks along to every minute of this mesmerising concert.

© © 2009 Cyber Corps, Inc./HD Ready, LLC. Under License To Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Sling Blade – Billy Bob Thornton

Billy Bob Thornton - Sling Blade  artwork

Sling Blade

Billy Bob Thornton

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: November 27, 1996


25 Years after committing an unthinkable crime, a quiet man named Karl finally returns home. Once there, he's befriended by a fatherless boy and his mother. But when his newfound peace is shattered by the mother's abusive boyfriend, Karl is suddenly placed on a collision course with his past!

© © 2011 Miramax

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

Billy Corgan Gets Songwriting Credit For Miguel’s ‘Leaves’

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan has received a songwriting credit on Miguel‘s “Leaves,” the R&B crooner has revealed. Miguel admitted that he approached Corgan for approval of the track because he feared it was too similar to the Pumpkins’ hit “1979.” After Corgan gave clearance for use of the track, he was given a co-writing credit on the song.
RTT – Music
Webcam Performers Wanted – Earn $ 100,000 per year!

Models Wanted
Promo Live Chat

Billy Joel Hosts Surprise Wedding At July Fourth Party

Billy Joel wed his long time girlfriend, Alexis Roderick, during a surprise ceremony at his annual Fourth of July party. New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo presided over the nuptials. Joel’s former wife, Christie Brinkley, posted her congrats via Instagram, writing, “Congratulations to the glowing bride and groom.”
RTT – Music
Webcam Performers Wanted – Earn $ 100,000 per year!

Models Wanted
Promo Live Chat

Billy Joel’s many songs about his many wives


News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

Copland: Fanfare Fo the Common Man, Billy the Kid, Appalachian Spring – Royal Philharmonic Orchestra & Phillip Ellis

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra & Phillip Ellis - Copland: Fanfare Fo the Common Man, Billy the Kid, Appalachian Spring  artwork

Copland: Fanfare Fo the Common Man, Billy the Kid, Appalachian Spring

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra & Phillip Ellis

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 8.99

Release Date: February 10, 2009

© ℗ 2009 Royal Philharmonic Masterworks

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Billy Corgan Performs Piano Cover Of The Beatles’ ‘Something’

Smashing Pumpkins fronter Billy Corgan performed a cover of the Beatles classic “Something” on his recent acoustic tour. The performance, captured by a fan and posted online, sees Corgan during a VIP Experience set seated at a piano. “It’s such a good song, and I keep f*****g it up,” he says, in the vid. “If I f**k up my own song, I’m like, ‘Well, I wrote it.'”
RTT – Music
Webcam Performers Wanted – Earn $ 100,000 per year!

Models Wanted
Promo Live Chat

Bernstein Century – Copland: Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (Billy The Kid) – Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic

Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic - Bernstein Century - Copland: Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (Billy The Kid)  artwork

Bernstein Century – Copland: Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (Billy The Kid)

Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 4, 1997

© ℗ Originally released 1960, 1962, 1967 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT (P) 1992 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Roger Waters Enlists Tom Morello And Billy Corgan For Benefit Show

Roger Waters has recruited Tom Morello, Billy Corgan and Sheryl Crow for the 2015 Music Heals benefit concert. The event is an annual one-night-only concert to raise money for the charity MusiCorps, a non-profit organization that supports injured soldiers and their families.
RTT – Music
Webcam Performers Wanted – Earn $ 100,000 per year!

Models Wanted
Promo Live Chat

Cocaine Cowboys: Reloaded – Billy Corben

Billy Corben - Cocaine Cowboys: Reloaded  artwork

Cocaine Cowboys: Reloaded

Billy Corben

Genre: Documentary

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 0.99

Release Date: April 8, 2014


The cocaine trade of the '70s and '80s had an indelible impact on contemporary Miami. Smugglers and distributors forever changed a once-sleepy retirement community into one of the world's most glamorous hot spots, the epicenter of a $ 20 billion annual business fed by Colombia's Medellin cartel. By the early '80s, Miami's tripled homicide rate had made it the murder capital of the country, for which a TIME cover story dubbed the city "Paradise Lost."

© © 2013 Rakontur Film Venture One, LLC. All Rights Reserved

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Independent

Pete Townshend’s Classic Quadrophenia – Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Robert Ziegler, Pete Townshend, Alfie Boe, Billy Idol & Phil Daniels

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Robert Ziegler, Pete Townshend, Alfie Boe, Billy Idol & Phil Daniels - Pete Townshend's Classic Quadrophenia  artwork

Pete Townshend’s Classic Quadrophenia

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Robert Ziegler, Pete Townshend, Alfie Boe, Billy Idol & Phil Daniels

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: June 5, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Eel-Pie Recording Productions Ltd. under exclusive license to Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Pete Townshend’s Classic Quadrophenia – Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Robert Ziegler, Pete Townshend, Alfie Boe, Billy Idol & Phil Daniels


Pete Townshend’s Classic Quadrophenia
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Robert Ziegler, Pete Townshend, Alfie Boe, Billy Idol & Phil Daniels

Release Date:
June 5, 2015
Total Songs:
17

Genre:
Classical

Price:
By Song Only

Copyright
℗ 2015 Eel-Pie Recording Productions Ltd. under exclusive license to Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin


iTunes 100 New Releases

Billy Ray Cyrus — Raising a New Miley Cyrus … Rocks Live with Noah Cyrus (VIDEO)

Billy Ray Cyrus can’t stop, won’t stop … cranking out talented spawn — he performed live with Miley Cyrus’ kid sister in L.A., and it sounds like the family’s got a new revenue stream coming. Noah Cyrus jumped on…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Music


This Time for Real – Billy Price & Otis Clay

Billy Price & Otis Clay - This Time for Real  artwork

This Time for Real

Billy Price & Otis Clay

Genre: Blues

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: May 19, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Bonedog Records/VizzTone Label Group

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Blues

Summer Forever – Billy Currington

Billy Currington - Summer Forever  artwork

Summer Forever

Billy Currington

Genre: Country

Price: $ 9.99

Expected Release Date: June 2, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Mercury Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Country

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts blowing his weiner. She straddles him and his hard rod pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her juicy clit with her fingers.
Soaking juicy from pleasure he pushed deeper into her cooche and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This guy’s shlong is making her wet fuckhole rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts mouthing his shaft. She straddles him and his hard rod pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her juicy clit with her fingers.
Soaking moist from pleasure he pushed deeper into her coochie and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This dude’s cock is making her moist cooche rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts sucking his shaft. She straddles him and his hard rod pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her dripping clit with her fingers.
Soaking wet from pleasure he pushed deeper into her vag and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This stud’s shlong is making her wet vagina rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts sucking his dickhead. She straddles him and his hard penis pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her juicy clit with her fingers.
Soaking juicy from pleasure he pushed deeper into her slit and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This guy’s pecker is making her wet pussy rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts mouthing his pecker. She straddles him and his hard rod pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her dripping clit with her fingers.
Soaking juicy from pleasure he pushed deeper into her vag and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This dude’s manhood is making her dripping vag rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

Mature Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts sucking his meatstick. She straddles him and his hard penis pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her dripping clit with her fingers.
Soaking juicy from pleasure he pushed deeper into her fuckhole and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This guy’s shlong is making her moist cooter rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

Mature Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts blowing his dickhead. She straddles him and his hard rod pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her moist clit with her fingers.
Soaking dripping from pleasure he pushed deeper into her vagina and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This man’s weiner is making her juicy cooche rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts blowing his dickhead. She straddles him and his hard penis pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her moist clit with her fingers.
Soaking moist from pleasure he pushed deeper into her fuckhole and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This dude’s dong is making her juicy cunt rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts blowing his tool. She straddles him and his hard penis pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her juicy clit with her fingers.
Soaking wet from pleasure he pushed deeper into her snatch and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This man’s tool is making her juicy twat rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Darien Ross, Billy Banks

Darien Ross plays the role of a genie and makes Billy Banks’ wishes come true. Out of thin air she pops into his living room and starts sucking his dick. She straddles him and his hard rod pumps her all the way in. Moaning with pleasure she turns around and he rams her the other way. To help out she rubs her moist clit with her fingers.
Soaking dripping from pleasure he pushed deeper into her snatch and is rewarded by her water fall of her juice. On her side now they do it again. This stud’s tool is making her wet cooche rain from pleasure. Ramming his wood all the way home at the last second pulls out and blows it in her open mouth.

MILF Porn

Chatting with The Boxmasters’ Billy Bob Thornton & J.D. Andrew, Plus Goodnight Moonshine, Lines West and Doug Burr Exclusives

GOODNIGHT MOONSHINE’S “DARK SIDE OF THE RAINBOW” MASHES PINK FLOYD WITH THE WIZARD OF OZ

2015-04-07-1428374670-5104823-image.jpg
photo courtesy of Seth Cohen PR

The video of the song “Dark Side of the Rainbow” is a mashup of Pink Floyd’s “Time” from Dark Side of the Moon, and “Over The Rainbow” from The Wizard of Oz. Their aim is to pull back the curtain not only the urban legend of the Pink Floyd album but also to reveal the tension that often exists within a new marriage.

According to Eben Pariser…

“The whole thing emerged from the 90s phenomenon of syncing The Wizard of Oz movie to the Dark Side of the Moon album, and all the speculation that the coincidences were way too precise for Pink Floyd to not be in on it, especially since they were making movie soundtracks at the time. When I was 16 (after allegedly indulging in the stoner-sport of syncing the film to the album,) I spontaneously realized that ‘Time’ was in fact a perfect reharmonization of ‘Over The Rainbow’–but it took me 16 more years to find the right vehicle to record and perform the mashup, in my lovely wife Molly and our collaboration, Goodnight Moonshine.'”

According to Molly Ventor…

“We set out wanting to convince people that Pink Floyd intentionally synched the album to​ The Wizard of Oz. During the filming, we realized how closely the 2 sets of lyrics paralleled the different sides of a longstanding philosophical argument we’d been having;​ Venter believing that much in life is out of one’s control and that we must remain hopeful and optimistic, Pariser believing more in the power of individual will and action, and that missed opportunities are one’s own fault. Through the taping we recognized​ we were each trying to convince the other of our own life perspective. ​The video captures how painful that endeavor is. We’re a newlywed couple, letting you in on our life together through our music. All the good stuff, but also the dark stuff, challenging stuff–the stuff that often goes unsaid. No kitsch. And largely positive and healing through the revelation that we are at the core, just normal folks trying to make a marriage work. A positive loving relationship, and a deeply artistic and somewhat daring one.”

For more on : http://www.goodnightmoonshine.com

******************************

2015-04-06-1428352625-6151346-617TA0Qr8DL._SS280.jpg

A Conversation with Billy Bob Thornton

Mike Ragogna: Billy, your group The Boxmasters has been working on its double CD Somewhere Down The Road for a while now. How does The Boxmasters hit you these days as opposed to when you were just starting out with the group?

Billy Bob Thornton: In the beginning, we didn’t really know how long it would last. It was kind of like a side project for my solo stuff. We thought we’d make that record and maybe another one and that would be it. It began as a sort of stylized thing. We were experimenting with a combination of British Invasion and hillbilly music and putting them together and wearing the suits in tribute to the sixties, which is the era we love. The first two or three records were almost like art projects. Like I said, they were very stylized. If you remember the first Boxmasters record, it had transitional music, so it never stopped. We put an extra CD of covers in each record as a bonus, songs we loved and that inspired and influenced us.

After those records were done and we parted ways with Vanguard Records, we thought we’d gone as far as we could. Then all of a sudden, we just started writing songs and playing the way we naturally sound as opposed to trying for a specific thing. On the first record, we were doing Mott The Hoople, The Beatles, The Byrds and singing it like David Allan Coe. Then JD and Brad and I started writing these songs and we just played them the way we naturally sound. As it turns out, the reason we made this new record a double is because we sound like two things. We have that moody sort of dark, atmospheric sound, and then we have this very late sixties LA country rock sound in the vein of The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, Burrito Brothers, with some influence of Petty and people like that. We discovered that that’s who we really are. We’ve written probably two or three hundred songs that aren’t even on records; we’ve got five or six songs that have already been mastered that aren’t out. We’re just going to sell those records on the website because we’ve got so many. That sound on Somewhere Down The Road–on the first side especially–is kind of what those other songs sound like. We’ve kind of finally settled into that.

MR: Do you feel like you guys reached this point creatively because of what’s going on in your personal lives? Maybe you’ve “matured” in some ways, if that’s the right word?

BT: I think that’s a good word for it. We have matured as songwriters, musicians, singers, everything. I think you can’t help doing something for so long that you’re just going to get better. We’ve gotten better over the years. I think we have more confidence. We know we can write songs and we know we can write songs that people can respond to as opposed to whatever weird stuff is in our head that we experiment with. I think we have definitely matured. I think recording is probably my favorite thing to do in music. We love playing live, that’s a great thing, but being in the recording studio is such a part of our souls and so natural to us. I love acting, I love doing movies and I love music, I love them all equally, but I think I only like the process of actually doing the stuff. I love the process of recording, I love the process of doing movies as an actor, I just don’t like all the other junk that’s involved with it. So maybe in the recording studio, you just feel exempt from everything when you’re in there. It’s like you’re hidden in a cave somewhere alone doing what you’re feeling in the moment. I guess that’s why we recorded so many songs; we just keep going. Even ones that aren’t intended to come out maybe. We get an idea for a song that probably isn’t commercially viable but we record it anyway because we want to.

MR: The process is more important than an end result. How is your creative expression different or the same in the fields of acting and music?

BT: They both really do feed my soul. Not only are they both very cathartic–I know that word is probably very overused but they truly are–but I just love the artistry of both. The thing is you get to experience what’s in your mind in different ways. It feels the same inside, it’s just as good both ways, but you get to experience your art in a different way. But to me, they’re really the same thing, just expressed in different ways. I never expected to become and actor of any stature. It just kind of happened. Because of that I always approach things this way: I’d rather have a hundred or two hundred really hardcore fans than millions of fans who just treat it like anything else and you get slagged off half the time and some of them are sort of interested or some hate it and some like it. It’s that end result thing you were talking about. I don’t do anything with that in mind. I never expect that we’re going to have a hit and I don’t particularly care if we do. It would be wonderful, but that’s not why we do it. That’s not why I do anything in movies either.

MR: You talked about fans who would really “get” what you put out. Can you identify what that kind of fan is, what your core fans love about The Boxmasters?

BT: Generally, our fans are people who like an eclectic mix of things. They’re people who aren’t diehard rock ‘n’ roll fans or die hard country fans, it’s kind of hard to identify our music and I think it’s kind of hard to identify our fans. We tend to have fans that are either forties and fifties and up or twenty year-olds. It’s sort of that middle range in there, people from thirty to forty, I don’t think we have as many of them for some reason. That could be because of whatever time they grew up in. I think maybe people in that age range were sort of spoon fed a particular fashion statement and things were put in boxes more when those people were growing up, whereas when I was growing up everything was very eclectic. I listened to Hank Williams and The Mothers Of Invention in the same day, and the radio would play James Taylor and Black Sabbath on the same station.

I think maybe the reason we have some younger fans is because that’s sort of starting to come back around. A lot of people are really down on music right now, but I see that even sometimes people of my generation are the ones trying to fit into a mold more and more. You see guys who were singing Vietnam protest songs and now they’re on the cover of a magazine doing a duet with a pop star so they can remain current. I’m finding that some of the guys in the younger bands are real fans of The Boxmasters because they themselves are looking for their thing like we were in the sixties. So when they hear something slightly off the beaten path they really dig it. I actually have hope for music right now. I really do. I didn’t before. Everybody knows the eighties was kind of a bizarre generation. The nineties had a little resurgence but then it kind of went away for a decade or so, but I think it’s really coming back. People are looking for different things. People are listening to certain metal bands as well as Mumford and Sons or the Old Crow Medicine Show, people like that. I think it’s on an upswing. Also young kids, say teenagers up until young twenties, are discovering The Beatles and Buffalo Springfield and Aerosmith and whoever it was along the way. There are plenty of twenty year olds who listen to Deep Purple and Zeppelin and The Who and everything like that.

MR: Since you’re a pretty solid music expert, doesn’t understanding what went into making classic, high-quality albums make the process a bit intimidating for you? Like how do you balance striving for that caliber while just expressing yourself and letting creativity flow?

BT: I think it’s two things. One is never forgetting history. Never forget that history of all the great classic albums over the years, letting them influence you and not being ashamed to say, “Yeah, absolutely, we were trying to be The Beatles” or The Stones or The Animals or whatever, that’s our desire. The bar was set very high for people of my generation. We all wanted to be The Beatles and we knew we were never going to be, that it was going to be impossible. You’re always reaching for an impossible goal, so you never get lazy about it. You’re always striving and you’re always desperate for acceptance and approval and everything. When the bar has been set that high you just never stop trying. At the same time, a good part of that is you have such great music and songwriting to draw from, you let it wash over you and influence you.

The second part is that you have to remain open to new things. We’re not trying to just copy old stuff that we love. We’re knot like that. We’re truly not the old guys chasing the kids out of the yard. We really do respect the evolution of music. I think you have to be open, resect the evolution of music and at the same time hold on to your history. You put those two things together and it’s very satisfying to you. Whether anybody is going to respond to it or not, that’s up to them. We have no control over it, but for us, if we accomplish those things, always striving to get better, always striving to be open to new possibilities and yet never letting our history die in our minds, the best of you comes out and you know at the end of the day that you’re not leaving any stone unturned. It’s very satisfying.

MR: These two CDs represent a fraction of the songs that you’ve recorded. So what was the assembly process like that led to this particular album?

BT: We were writing new songs to make an album, but when you’re writing songs, one day you may not feel a song that’s in that vein, so you write something else. It’s like, “Well, that doesn’t belong here. I love the song but it just doesn’t belong in this particular group of songs that we started.” So we took the maybe twenty or so songs that we had that were new and said, “Wow, we’ve only got five of these jangly, Byrds-like LA rock songs and we’ve got seven of these moody things. That doesn’t make one album.” So we went back into some of the songs we’d written before. I think the earliest ones on this record are from 2010. There were two or three of those that exactly fit what we were doing now. We had started writing this whole record of very sixties-like songs using a Farfisa Vox Continental Organ, and we said, “You know what? If that organ was a B3 instead those songs would totally fit this record.” So we had Teddy Andreadis, our keyboard player, just come over and replace the Farfisa with a B3 and suddenly they belonged on the album. Once we got those songs together, the label people, Mark and Tammy Collie who signed us to 101 Ranch Records, had certain favorites that were in the moodier side. We side, “Gosh, we don’t want to put out just a moody record right now because we want people to hear these pop rock songs. Let’s ask them if we can do a double album.” They were all for it. I guess, as they say, it was no skin off their nose. We ended up saying, “Well look, these are the songs we love; let’s just make two records.”

So we wrote new songs and collected ones from other recording sessions that just fit and ended up with the two records we really wanted. The other five or six records that we had finished we didn’t want to break up because they fit together too. There are songs from all of those records that could’ve gone on this, and as a matter of fact some songs where we were like, “I wish we could put this on here, it really fits,” but we didn’t want to break those records up. As a result, we ended up saying, “We’ll sell those on the website at a later time.” We do have a real nice cult following, people who really love us. There aren’t a lot of them, but they’re great. We thought, “What we’ll do is we’ll even maybe put out five song or six song EPs of songs we don’t have enough of that style to make a whole record.” Some of them are even in demo form. We thought it might be interesting every now and then to put on the website a five song EP of songs that aren’t even finished, so people can hear what it’s like before, say, the lead guitar’s on there, or there’s no background vocals or something like that. Then later on, we’ll finish those and put them up finished.

MR: To me, the title track, “Somewhere Down The Road,” is the centerpiece of the album. For you, are there a couple of other tracks that are really important for the project?

BT: There’s a song on the first side called “This Game Is Over” which is a particular favorite of ours. On the moody side there’s a song called “What Did You Do Today?” which I think is what they’re putting out on Americana radio mainly and a song called “Somewhere” that we’re really in love with. It’s a very different-sounding song. It’s got a very different chord progression and I sing it slightly differently. But you love all your songs and you hope other people will, but sometimes you might have a favorite song that nobody else responds to and then you have another song where you say, “Eh, that’s kind of a standard song,” and everybody’s crazy about it. You never know. But “This Game Is Over,” a song called “Getting Past The Lullaby,” which I think is a beautiful song. Anybody who loves their mother is going to love that song.

MR: What do you feel about The Boxmasters’ legacy? When you look at this body of your work as well as the unreleased albums, what are your observations?

BT: I truly believe that if we had been twenty-five or thirty years old in 1968 or 1973, we would have been a huge band. I think we probably make music the way we do and with the passion that we do for thirty or forty years from now and not for today. I feel that someday, we will be an appreciated band, so I kind of look at it that way. We do it for ourselves and we do it the way we feel. We don’t craft anything tailor-made to be a hit, but I do believe that someday when people hear the thousand songs that we have I think some music geek is going to say, “Hey, you know what? I think these guys are worth their salt.”

MR: Billy, what advice do you have for new artists?

BT: I would say first and foremost learn the history. It’s like for you, as a journalist and as a writer, someone who is a fan but also makes a living at it, if you didn’t know who Walter Cronkite was, or Edward R. Murrow or Mark Twain or Jim Morrison or Chuck Berry was, if you weren’t real familiar with them, then you don’t have the education that it takes to truly be an artist. I would tell them, “Don’t just look at what’s shiny and bright in front of you right now. Always learn your history.” Also, if you’re a singer or a guitar player or whatever it is, even if your intention is to become famous doing whatever’s popular, if you’re content to let someone else write the songs and you just be the artist, I would say still write anyway. Even if you don’t intend to put it out there, even if you don’t feel it’s good, I think writing is an exercise that just makes you better whether it’s ever going to be seen or heard by the public or not. And write it from your heart and do it the way you feel it. Don’t try to copy anybody. Even if your life is going to be about copying and becoming popular and doing the current thing, I think it’s still important to create what you naturally create. I think it makes you better as a human being and as an artist.

MR: Excellent. Now what’s your advice to yourself?

BT: I think probably the number one best piece of advice for myself, and it’s so hard to do, is to ignore the comments of the now millions and millions of critics. Now with social networks everyone has an opinion and if you rub them the wrong way there’s not anything you can do about what they’re going to say. There’s seriously nothing you can do. So in other words, if they’ve got a bee up their ass about you, let’s say you say something stupid in public and it gets on the news, what an ass you are, if you apologize publicly, which has become a popular thing–“I’ll apologize to everyone”–they’ll say, “Oh, he only did that to help his career.” If you don’t apologize, then you’re an asshole for not apologizing. In other words, I’m trying to learn that there’s not a thing I can do about the people that hate me on the internet. Nothing.

As an artist, you’re sensitive by nature, and probably a little unbalanced, so it gets to you more. I’m trying to learn how to not let my oversensitive nature overtake me and make me stick my head back in the cave and not want to put myself out there. You have to do it. There are a lot of people out there who suffer from this. A lot of people have made comments like this throughout history but I think Jonathan Swift said something like, “…if what a certain writer observes be true, that when a great genius appears in the world, the dunces are all in confederacy against him.” I think you just have to get used to the fact that you’re doing what you love and what you feel and you are at least doing it, so anybody who’s willing to stick their neck out–and I don’t care if it’s the silliest part on the silliest sitcom out there or the deepest Marlon Brando performance out there–both of those people have something in common. Both of them were willing to try.

In that sense, you can’t separate anybody in the entertainment business, no matter if they’re a lightweight or real heavy. If you make a silly, syrupy pop record or you make some masterpiece like Dark Side Of The Moon, the one thing those two have in common is that they both put their necks out of the cave. They’re both willing to do something, so you end up being talked about by people who are not doing anything. We have to pay attention to the people who do, not the people who talk about the people who do. That’s the biggest lesson for me.

MR: Wow. So are you looking forward to the tour as a way to get your head fully back into music for a while?

BT: Yeah, I really am looking forward to it, especially since I’m going out with Brad and Teddy and J.D.. They’re my friends. I don’t have a lot of close friends, I have a lot of acquaintances, but I’m going to be out there on a bus with guys who are my friends and who I spend time with anyway. There’s a certain family camaraderie there. The only bad thing about touring is it’s not a good place for the kids, on the bus and everything. My daughter Bella is now ten. She’s going to be eleven in September and I’m going to miss her a lot. It’s thirty five days, but thirty five days when they’re ten is a big deal. That’s the hardest part of touring. On a movie, it’s different, we just got back from New Mexico and the family went with me because you’re in one spot. On this you just can’t do it. And we’re not spring chickens, either. It’s not like when we were younger. I used to rodeo and I could sleep in the front of a truck while some guy’s driving. It’s not like that anymore. We all try to take all of our vitamins and get ready to go.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

A Conversation with The Boxmasters’ J.D. Andrew

Mike Ragogna: J.D.! You good?

JD Andrew: I’m good! I’m trying to shake the nerves of getting ready to go on tour. I haven’t had a tour where I left my kids for longer than four or five days, so that’s a little nerve wracking right now. Last time I didn’t have any kids when we went so I didn’t have to worry about it.

MR: What’s it like juggling your music duty and being a new dad?

J.D.: Most of the time it’s not too bad. Billy sold his house a couple of years ago, so we don’t have the studio in the house anymore, so we don’t work six days a week fifteen hours a day anymore. If I had the kids and we were still doing that schedule I would probably shoot myself. It’s a lot easier time now, we just go and record when we have some songs or have some time. It’s a lot more relaxing, especially when the kids don’t sleep at night.

MR: So this new album is a double CD, which is pretty ambitious. How did you approach this one? You recorded it progressively over the last few years, right?

J.D.: Mostly. This one was done mostly at Henson studios, some of it was done over at Billy’s house previously, but it started in about 2013 sometime. Brad and Billy wrote “This Game Is Over” and “Sometimes There’s A Reason.” I would call those two songs the touchstones for at least the first CD. They’re all original, both CDs. The first one is kind of more rock ‘n’ roll and jangly sixties country rock stuff and the second one is more of the moody singer-songwriter stuff, more like Billy’s Beautiful Door record, using his Warren Zevon influences and doing that sort of thing. I would say three quarters of this stuff was all done in the past two or three years. Some of it is from five years ago. When we initially met with 101 Ranch they were like, “Give us a record! We want to put it out.” We had so much back catalog material and records finished we initially started just picking songs from everything but we said, “We really want to keep these other records together and release those as they are at some point,” so we said, “Why don’t we just do a double record?” and the label went, “Sure, why not?” That was in some ways easier for us, to concentrate on two different sounds, the two different things that we do rather than figure out how to mix the two together.

MR: How has the band evolved sonically?

J.D.: The other projects were more hyper-stylized. We were really going for the combination of the early sixties/hillbilly/British invasion stuff. We made very definite guidelines on what were going to do, what we weren’t going to do, what equipment we would use, things like that. As we’ve evolved we’ve evolved into playing how we play naturally. It’s still got all of those sixties influences, it’s just a little more–I don’t even want to say “modern,” it’s just a little more relaxed in its stringency to those kinds of rules that we set before. It’s kind of jangly rock ‘n’ roll.

MR: So it’s like Boxmasters 2.0.?

J.D.: Yeah. Brad Davis is playing lead guitar on this stuff, we had another guy on those first couple of records. Not that they do a lot of things differently, it just is a version two. Brad Davis and Teddy Andreadis are now official Boxmaster members. We’re a four-piece as far as documentation goes. We’ve got six guys on the road. It’s just become more of a straight rock ‘n’ roll band at times with crazy moody psychedelic stuff in it.

MR: How are you going to perform this project on the road? And what have you learned from being on the road that you’re now applying to Boxmasters’ music?

J.D.: We’ve always kind of been a straight-ahead rock ‘n’ roll band on the road. We sound big, we play loud. Right now it’s two electric guitars, an organ, a bass player, a drummer, and Billy’s out front and we just try to fill it up, but this time we are doing some shows at smaller venues where we’re going to do a slightly more stripped-down version of ourselves where there’s some acoustic guitars and some stools, which we’ve never really done before. We’re going to play some of these songs where we get more moody and slow.

MR: J.D., what have you found Billy’s favorite environment for a Boxmasters show to be?

J.D.: Billy wants a big show. He wants a place where we can have a good light show. Basically the thing he doesn’t want to do in any place, no matter how big or small, is he doesn’t want to look like a bar band. We work really hard on putting these shows together and we want that to come across. There’s lighting and projections and fun stuff going on, we want a sound system that will actually play above the band so it sounds big. When he does these really moody songs, he sings in his low register and he’s got a very resonant voice, so sometimes you need a system to get it to come out. When you’re kind of whispering it’s hard to get it out to the people.

MR: How about you? What are your favorite kinds of venues?

J.D.: My favorite places that we’ve played have been punk clubs. I like to sound like The Replacements live. Basically, “Let’s have a train wreck and have a lot of fun doing it!” At the same time, we want the songs to have starts and endings that actually start and end together and not just devolve into chaos. But I like them to all be faster than they probably should be, and louder and trashier. That’s just my personal preference. We’re a tight band, we’ve got really good players, it’s a lot of fun to play with the guys.

MR: Do you prefer recording or performing more?

J.D.: I have so much freedom in the recording process as far as how we sound. That’s what I do. That’s my initial hat that I think of. Playing live is fun, but then I have to worry about how fat I am and getting up in front of people and looking like a complete loser. That’s the part I worry about.

MR: When you’re recording are you considering having to play these songs live?

J.D.: No, we don’t tend to think about that at all. When we recorded most of these songs, it wasn’t until August or September of last year that we were really thinking of putting these together as a record. Anything we’ve recorded was just because we felt like recording it. Billy’s like, “As long as I can get in the studio every few weeks or once a month I’m fine. Otherwise, I lose my mind.” Everything is just recorded as we feel at the time. There’s no other outside influences like playing live or anything. The tempos are whatever is right for him to sing to and the rest of the instrumentation is mostly whatever our strengths are. I play the jangly stuff, Brad plays the fancy lead guitar stuff, Teddy does the keyboards and Billy’s the drummer, that’s it. Whatever fits whatever song is being done at that time is what we do.

MR: Do you have a couple of favorites on the project?

J.D.: I think every one of us would agree that “This Game Is Over” is one of our favorite songs, sonically, lyrically, vocally. It’s just really a great song. Another one of my favorites is “Somewhere Down The Road,” the last song and the title song of the record. That’s a song that was initially on another project we were kind of working out, kind of a concept record that we haven’t finished yet, so it just made sense that that song would go in this new batch. It’s one of the few songs that I actually remember writing. We wrote so many songs that I don’t remember the actual genesis of, but for some reason I remember when we wrote “Somewhere Down The Road” and how we did it. I’m trying to go down the list in my head. “Young Man’s Game” is my favorite one on the second side.

MR: I love that the concept of “sides” of a record has expanded into meaning two CDs.

J.D.: [laughs] Yeah.

MR: Which side would you listen to casually?

J.D.: I would probably drive to the first one and put the second one on at my house to do work. They’re just two different moods. The first one is much more of an exciting record for doing upbeat things and the other one’s a little more for doing introspective things.

MR: How has the writing experience evolved for you guys?

J.D.: We’ve done eight or ten songs since that record has been finished and we’re actually working more as a quartet on writing some of these songs. Most of the time, Billy will either have a chord or two that he’s plinked out on the guitar and maybe he has a lyric idea, he might have a whole lyric written. Some of the time, I have a whole track started or completely finished, other times I’ll just have some sort of riff idea. Really it comes from anything that gives us inspiration. It doesn’t take a lot, really, it’s just a couple of chords that make us perk up and go, “Hey, that’s something!” Then we’ll turn it into a song. Teddy brings all of his piano chords into the mix, so we’re trying to incorporate more of that along into what we do because it just gives it a little bit more different stuff. All that equals inspiration.

MR: Do you feel like the permanent addition of keyboard has shifted the focus of your approach?

J.D.: It’s not going to end up being a big sonic shift, it’s just anything that gives us an inspiration. Teddy can add a couple of different weird chords into things. That’s what we’re always going for, just evolving into more weird chords.

MR: Does Billy’s schedule as an actor ever conflict with the band’s schedule?

J.D.: He says, “Let’s tour in April” and that’s when we go. Any time we have something band-related that’s going on that’s important he just tells his film manager that this is what we’re going to do. It’s not a lucrative position for him, but a lot of times they can reschedule. We haven’t had to deal with that before, because he wasn’t making a lot of movie projects for quite a while, which gave us years of constant recording. This is the first time he might actually have a bunch of projects going on. We’ve all got stuff going on, Brad’s got his own studio in Texas, he’s got to take time to close the place down and postpone projects, and Teddy’s always on the road playing with someone. I hang out with my kids most of the time when I’m not working with Billy. It’s good.

MR: So this has evolved in a good way for you all, time-wise.

J.D.: Yeah, everybody has other things they do. It’s just a matter of, “Hey, are you available this time?” “Yeah, I am,” “Great, let’s get together and do something.” It’s not the other three of us sitting around and going, “Man, I can’t wait until we can tour again.” It’s whenever it’s good for all of us. We’re excited to make it all happen.

MR: J.D., what advice do you have for new artists?

JD: My advice is to not chase whatever trend is going on and try to sound like everyone else. Take the people you are inspired by and start digging into who inspired them, and then find out who inspired them. Get back to the root of the music that you love. It might surprise you as to what was the genesis for somebody else’s inspiration. I’m sure Billy will say this too–learn your history. There’s so much of it that’s being lost, we have to hold on to it and learn it and teach it to others. Use that history and use it to inspire you to make music that is personal to yourself and not just whatever the next hot thing is that’s going to get you on American Idol.

MR: Nice. Do you think that’s what people are taking away when they listen to a Boxmasters project?

J.D.: I hope so. They should know that it’s heavily influenced by the past. We’re trying to bring it to new audiences, especially with the older cover stuff. Bring it to new audiences who might say, “I really like that song by Webb Pierce, I want to go listen to more of that,” and then they go and find Del Reeves or Merle Haggard or The Boxtops or anybody like that. Find things that are inspiring and might lead them to new creative heights.

MR: Musically, is there anything out there that surprises you anymore?

J.D.: I constantly feel like an idiot because there’s so much stuff that I haven’t heard. I hang out with Brad and Billy and Teddy and they are insane in their knowledge. It makes me feel like I don’t know anything. It makes me feel like I have to be constantly learning and looking into doing other things so I don’t feel like a complete idiot. These guys know so much history, it’s inspiring. Everyone really is influenced at their core level by other things. Brad grew up as a bluegrasser, Teddy grew up more of a rock ‘n’ roll, R&B kind of guy, Detroit via New Jersey. I’m also a little bit younger than those guys, I started learning a little bit later than them. Even though I was years behind my time I haven’t caught up. I’ve still got a lot to learn.

MR: What kind of a legacy do you want The Boxmasters to have?

J.D.: Basically I want people to listen to the music and read the lyrics and see that there’s a whole lot going on. Some of it’s poppy, bouncy, good time-sounding stuff but there’s really deep thoughts and stories and things going on that are a lot deeper than they might think. I want people to know, “Hey, that’s Billy singing,” he really is a great vocalist, a great storyteller, and all those crazy girl harmonies that you’re hearing in there, that’s him, too. I think I’m the boring underneath stuff that’s not the stuff you listen to and go, “Wow, that’s fantastic,” but he does all the high stuff that I can’t even reach anyway. There’s a lot going on in these records even if it just sounds like some guys bashing away. And it’s all played, there’s not machines going on. This is all how they used to make records in the old days. That’s what we do. We don’t use tracks live, we just play songs. That’s why we crash and burn at times.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

******************************

LINES WEST’S “PERFECT PAIR” EXCLUSIVE

2015-04-07-1428378239-9815285-LinesWestNewBShot.jpg
photo credit: Ryker Kallas

According to Brian Larney…

“Lately, John and I have been talking a lot about some of the great songs of the late 60s and 70s a la Badfinger or Paul McCartney. The sound of those records and the song craft on them is just mind blowing. In every song there’s a killer hook! I had the idea of “Perfect Pair” kicking around for a while and it seemed to just beg for an arrangement that reflected our enthusiasm for that sound.”

Lyrically, it’s really about a pedestal and a plea. I can remember a few times finding myself in one of those -the quintessential unrequited situations yet I remain an optimist. The song ends with ‘I can take you anywhere. We’re two of a perfect pair’…I guess I’m just hopeless.”

******************************

DOUG BURR’S “NEVER GONNA BE YOUNG AGAIN” EXCLUSIVE

2015-04-07-1428378953-7392300-DougBurr1.jpg
photo courtesy Tell All Your Friends PR

According to Doug Burr…

“We wanted this one to be jangly, Buddy Holly sounding. The music is kind of at odds with the story on this one–which is nothing new in the folk music world of course, the idea of a soldier living through war. Musically it stands out a bit on the record, but the subject matter was spot-on, and that song had received such strong audience response when playing it live. I’d been including that one in some live shows, since about 2012. So it felt like it needed to be a part of this record.”


Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Hot Tip Alert!

Click here for more.

Billy Ray Cyrus — I’m on Patrick Schwarzenegger’s Side

[[tmz:video id=”0_vu6fazg6″]] Billy Ray Cyrus has NO PROBLEM with his daughter’s boyfriend getting chummy with chicks in Cabo. Miley’s dad was out in L.A., when a photog asked about Patrick’s now famous Spring break, and Billy Ray made it clear … he’s…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Hook Ups


Billy Corgan: Smashing Pumpkins’ Future ‘Is Kind of Murky’

Billy Corgan has given hints recently that Smashing Pumpkins could be coming to an end, saying in a pair of interviews following the release of Monuments to an Elegy that “The next album is like the end, end, end. The trite way to say it is, ‘I’m over rock & roll'” and…
RollingStone.com: News

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Click and Enjoy!

Disney Star Billy Unger — Sues Dad for Unger Games … He Blew My Cash On His Girlfriend

The star of Disney’s “Lab Rats” … Billy Unger got fleeced by his own dad/manager, who used the cash to impress a chick … according to a lawsuit filed by Billy. In the docs … Billy says his popager William Unger mishandled nearly $ 400K of…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Celebrity Justice


Billy Idol On World Cafe

The U.K. punk veteran (and ’80s rock legend) performs old and new songs live in the studio.

» E-Mail This

Rock

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Click and Enjoy!

Bonnaroo 2015: Billy Joel, Mumford and Sons, Deadmau5 Lead Lineup

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer and multiplatinum icon Billy Joel will be headlining the 2015 edition of the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival.
Related: 45 Best Things We Saw at Bonnaroo 2014
The initial lineup for the 13th annual mega-fest — announced earlier this evening via an interactive social-media blitz — also includes……
RollingStone.com: News

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Click and Enjoy!

Bonnaroo 2015 Lineup Includes Billy Joel, Kendrick Lamar And Deadmau5

Bonnaroo, arguably the biggest music festival of the summer, announced its lineup on Tuesday. Including Billy Joel, Mumford & Sons, Deadmau5 and Kendrick Lamar, the list features some artists who blew critics away in 2014 (Run The Jewels, Hozier and Caribou, to name a few) and newcomers who are just starting to get their festival sea legs (see: Tove Lo, Odesza and Ryn Weaver). Bonnaroo regulars like Florence and the Machine, Alabama Shakes and Flying Lotus are also on the bill.

Set in Manchester, Tennessee, Bonnaroo will run from June 11-14, and features more than 125 bands. Tickets go on sale Jan. 17 at 12 p.m. ET. Here’s the full list of artists scheduled to perform:

bonnaroo

2015 Bonnaroo Lineup:

Billy Joel, Mumford & Sons, Deadmau5, Kendrick Lamar, Florence and The Machine, Robert Plant and The Sensational Space Shifters, My Morning Jacket, Bassnectar, Alabama Shakes, Childish Gambino, Flume, Hozier, Slayer, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, Belle and Sebastian, Spoon, The War On Drugs, STS9, Ben Folds, SuperJam, Atmosphere, Atomic Bomb! Who Is William Onyeabor?, Tears for Fears, Brandi Carlile, Twenty|One|Pilots, The Bluegrass Situation SuperJam featuring Ed Helms & Special Guests, Flying Lotus, Earth Wind & Fire, Caribou, Gary Clark Jr., SBTRKT, Punch Brothers
Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood, Tove Lo, Run the Jewels, Dawes, G-Eazy, Trampled By Turtles, Sturgill Simpson, Moon Taxi, AWOLNATION, Sylvan Esso, Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn, Guster, Jamie XX, Against Me!, Odesza, SOJA, Jerry Douglas Presents Earls of Leicester, Bleachers, Rudimental, Mac DeMarco, Tycho, The Very Best, Freddie Gibbs & Madlib, Shakey Graves, Shabazz Palaces, Gramatik, Mø, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Jungle, Benjamin Booker, Houndmouth, The Growlers, Glass Animals, Ana Tijoux, SZA, Courtney Barnett, Rhiannon Giddens, Royal Blood, Tanya Tagaq, Woods,
Hurray For The Riff Raff, Iceage, Temples, Between The Buried & Me, Rustie, Ryn Weaver, Dopapod, Pokey LaFarge, Priory
Bahamas, Strand of Oaks, Phox, Gregory Alan Isakov, Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath, The Districts, Madisen Ward & Mama Bear, DMA’s, Catfish & The Bottlemen, Jon Cleary & The Monster Children, Pallbearer, Dej Loaf
Christopher Denny, Hiss Golden Messenger, King Gizzard and The Lizard Wizard, Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas, Unlocking the Truth
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Hot Tip Alert!

Click here for more.

Kevin Spacey — Belts Billy Joel Like a Boss

You’ve got to check out “House of Cards” star Kevin Spacey honoring Billy Joel with an epic performance of “Piano Man” … proving he’s still got real deal pipes.Spacey does the classic major justice as part of “Billy Joel: The Library Of Congress…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Music


A Producer’s View of Billy Bob’s Master Class #OWNSHOW

RETWEET THIS: http://bit.ly/BillyBobMasterClass
Billy Bob Thornton is not the tabloid sensation we though he was. Go behind the interview with Executive Producer Jon Sinclair, as he give insights into Billy Bob and some of his hilarious views on life.
#OWNSHOW is a digital exclusive web-show on Oprah.com. Packaged into stackable moments, the show brings together stories, life-tips, and personalities from Oprah.com, OWN, and O Magazine with interactive elements from YOU, the community.

Subscribe to OWN: http://bit.ly/18Lz0rV

Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN

Visit our channel for more videos:https://www.youtube.com/user/OWN

https://www.facebook.com/ownTV

http://instagram.com/oprah


Uploads by OWN TV

How Billy Bob Thornton Observes the World – Master Class – OWN

Tune in Sunday, July 20, at 10/9c.

Oscar-winning screenwriter, director and actor Billy Bob Thornton is a storyteller at heart. Billy Bob says his talent for writing such films as Sling Blade and Jayne Mansfield’s Car comes from his love of people and characters. He explains what important quality a writer should have, and reveals the unique way he views the world.

For more on Oprah’s Master Class, visit http://www.oprah.com/MasterClass

Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN

Visit our channel for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/OWN

https://www.facebook.com/ownTV

http://instagram.com/oprah


Uploads by OWN TV

Billy Ray Cyrus calls slain Nevada teacher ‘hero’

Billy Ray Cyrus honors slain Nevada schoolteacher as ‘hero’ at Lake Tahoe concert
MSN Music: News
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

Chats with ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons, Rich Robinson, The English Beat’s Dave Wakeling and Leela James, Plus Sin Cos Tan

2014-06-20-8112nxvsIiL._SL1500_.jpg

2014-06-20-91aQhxdPOL._SL1432_.jpg

A Conversation with ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons

Mike Ragogna: Billy, in addition to ZZ Top’s tour, there’s a new double disc retrospective CD at Warners being released as well as your Live At Montreux concert at Eagle Rock. Considering your over forty years together are being presented yet contrasted with these two releases, what have you observed to be the biggest changes between the ZZ Top of 1969 and now?

Billy F. Gibbons: We have a much better way of getting to the gigs. Back then it was a van with all the gear stuffed inside and now we go by motor coach and our gear is transported in a semi. The crowds now are a bit bigger… We once played a gig attended by exactly one paying customer but we gave him the full show; bought him a Coke at the end to show our appreciation. Did we mention the food? We’ve come a long way from hash and Big Red Soda but always reserve the right to go back.

MR: Your Live At Montreux 2013 DVD and Blu-ray presents ZZ Top features material from the very early days. Do those songs still have the same impact on you and the guys as they did when you first began performing?

BFG: Absolutely, yes. The prism of time has a way of turning coal into diamonds. We loved those early songs then and still do now. You know… We’re the same three guys–wait for it–playing the same three chords.

MR: Do you have a couple of favorite moments from the Live At Montreux 2013 performances? You’ve played Montreux before, but other than its having been recorded for a release, in your opinion, was there something particularly magical or different about this concert that separates it from prior Montreux performances?

BFG: It was definitely special. We wanted to do something to honor the memory of Claude Nobs who founded the festival and had been our friend for many years. He died quite unexpectedly earlier in that year so we knew we had to do something very special. Since he was a jazz aficionado, we thought we’d jazz things up a big and, to that end, flew in two jazz cats from Austin–Mike Flanigin on B-3 and Van Wilkes on second guitar. Yes, in Claude’s honor, ZZ Top was a five piece groove unit for part of the set.

MR: Does the band have any favorites from the catalog that you still can’t wait to get to in the set list?

BFG: We have an inclusionary policy. If we recorded it or sort of know it we’re game to play it. We perform songs from “ZZ Top’s First Album” quite regularly and do some stuff we’ve never recorded like Willie Brown’s “Future Blues.” That song dates from 1930 and, as you know, Willie Brown is named checked by none other than Robert Johnson in “Crossroads.” He recorded it for Paramount Records, the label that Jack White has been highlighting of late. And we also do some new stuff.. quite a few off our most recent album, La Futura, the title of which may very well have been inspired by that selfsame Willie Brown, don’tcha know?

MR: At the time, how surprising was the huge success of “Gimme All Your Lovin’,” “Legs” and “Sharp Dressed Man” as both audio and videos hits to the band?

BFG: We approached the video revolution very gingerly. The band figured to just kind of stay in the background and keep the focus on the pretty girls and that little red car. Seems like everybody didn’t mind we were bystanders in our own videos and the rest, as they say, is history.

MR: In the eighties–the age of videos breaking or significantly supporting recording artists–ZZ Top created some of the most fun and outrageous clips in rotation. Your videos maintained a video theme for the group, as if each video were an episode of a series. How did the scripts come together and was there a point when ZZ Top was writing songs with the videos in mind?

BFG: We worked with our renegade director, Tim Newman, Randy’s cousin, as it happened. Tim is very inventive and intuitive. Although we didn’t write songs with video actually in mind, yet we do tend to think and, perhaps, create, with a subliminal cinematic sense.

MR: What are your thoughts about some of your other trademark songs like “Tush” and “La Grange”?

BFG: They’re great. “La Grange” put us on the map in terms of Top 40 radio and we just love to do that “haw, haw, haw” part. “Tush” was written in about as long as it takes to perform. It just jumped up during a searingly sweltering soundcheck and it’s been part of the set ever since. The subject matter in both songs seems to retain a certain universal appeal.

MR: “Degüello”, with “I’m Bad I’m Nationwide,” “I Thank You,” “Cheap Sunglasses,” and more is considered one of the band’s best albums and personally, I don’t think there’s a weak moment. Might this have been the album that changed everything up as far as ZZ Top’s approach to creating projects?

BFG: The entirety of the “Degüello” recordings, and certainly the mixing, unfolded in Memphis and that soulful setting kind of changed the way we thought about recording and the mystery of the process. Great records made in Memphis goes back for decades and when ZZ hit town, the skill set was in place when we jumped in. “I Thank You,” being a Sam and Dave song that was a Stax Records hit is just that–a thank you to Memphis and the vibe it imbues.

MR: Beautiful. So the band is coming up on 45 years of working together with its original lineup. What’s the musical and personal partnership like with you, Dusty and Frank after all these years?

BFG: It’s intact and ready to go for another 45. We three have a really fine time getting out there playing. We maintain a constant reunion of that early era if you like, so one can think of the last 3 decades as keeping one foot in them blues! On occasion, arriving at a venue early, the game is racing radio controlled cars over the parking lot. Yes, remaining eighteen is our mental immaturity and there ain’t nothin’ wrong with that… Rock on…!

MR: What do you think the state of bluesrock is in these days? Do you think there are any acts out there that might represent some of the best of the field?

BFG: There’ a host of great acts out and about. Like what Black Joe Louis & the Honeybears are doing in Austin and how the Black Keys are putting it down from their current Nashville base. There are lots more… What about Serbian blues chanteuse Ana Popovic? The girl can play. As far as pure singers are concerned, we’re big Shemekia Copeland fans.

MR: Traditional question…what advice do you have for new artists?

BFG: Get out there and play! We don’t know of any other way, especially, if you don’t have pin-up looks.

MR: Any plans or projects in the works for the band or individually in the immediate future?

BFG: We’re thinking about our next album…already have some songs rattling around. The big news for us is a string of dates coming up in a few months with Jeff Beck. That is going to be a tour when we wish we could be in the audience.

2014-06-20-RichRobinsonsonJune3.jpg

A Conversation with The Black Crowes’ Rich Robinson

Mike Ragogna: Rich, The Ceaseless Sight, what’s the vision of the album and what was the creative process?

Rich Robinson: I knew I wanted to make a record and it worked out perfectly, time-wise. I knew we weren’t going to be touring after 2013. Instead of going in with full songs, I had more skeletons. I had a chorus or a verse or whatever and then when we got into the studio, we used that energy of, “We’ve got to get this done.” We had a short time, we only had a month to make the record. A lot of times, that happens in Woodstock, or in the studio in general. You have a couple of ideas, but when you get in the context–especially with me, because I like to write with drums in the room–you get in that context and it kind of clears the path and allows for that energy to come through and create those songs. I didn’t necessarily have a context going into this record. For twenty-five years, I’ve always tried to approach making records as a collection of songs that create something slightly greater than one song as a whole piece. The sequence of a record, the songs of a record, how does the verse fit into a song, how does the chorus fit into a song, how do they songs fit into a record, how does the record fit into my body of work? How does that fit into twenty-five years of doing this? To answer the question of the uniqueness of this record, a lot of times, I would have songs done before I went into the studio. For twenty-five years, I would have ten or fifteen almost done going into the studio, but this time, like I said, I’m just using skeletons.

Some songs took a while to write. “Down The Road” was a song where I had this verse part for a long time and every time I would sit down with it it wasn’t ready to be finished and then I finished it and that was it. Then “I Know You” and “Giving Key” I wrote right there on the spot. It took about five minutes to write those songs. In a sense everything just flowed for those two songs. It doesn’t make eitehr song more or less valid, it just makes them different. Over the years with Crowes there have been songs that took me a long time to write. I wrote the verse to “Nonfiction” early on Southern Harmony but I dind’t finish it until Amorica. It took a year and a half to find the right parts to make that. There’ve been songs like that over the years. I just kind of look at it as this one giant experience as opposed to this singular experrience. But I like how they all fit into a greater piece of work.

MR: “Ceaseless Sight” has larger a concept, “Giving Key” has a larger concept. It looks like lyrically and conceptually, you took a bigger swing with this album.

RR: Yeah, I think so. I think creatively and lyrically, yeah. I focus on the music first and throughout writing the songs, I’ll come up with a melody idea or maybe a concept for the actual song, just a general, “This is about this” or “This might be about that.” Then I just sit and listen to the song over and over again in the studio and just start writing, finishing lyrics to it. But absolutely, the whole point of this record is to look forward and not look backwards and to let go of a lot of s**t. I think at least for me and I think a lot of people on Earth tend to look backwards or try to choose what’s easy or what you know. They don’t want to know what’s around the corner, and I think it’s comforting in that sense. I think we’re designed to be comforted by knowing what we can expect, so in that sense, this world is becoming more and more that way. Our politics are tailored to what we want and there are outlets now for that. “I only watch MSNBC” or “I only watch Fox News” or “I only read The Drudge Report,” you know what I mean? There doesn’t seem to be a general acceptance of what “is.” It seems like there used to be at least a general accepted idea that the world is round and gravity exists. Now it’s like, “is it really round?”

MR: You forgot how we’ve only been around for five thousand years and the dinosaurs came over on Noah’s Ark.

RR: Yeah, but the dinosaurs were vegetarians, so they didn’t eat humans and that’s why we lived. But that’s the thing! If we can’t all agree on some common, basic facts, we’re kind of f**ked. In that same sense, the way that we now consume everything–clothes and hard goods. But we also now consume politics. We consume news stories, we consume drama, we consume music, we consume books. It’s more of an approach from a service industry, so we expect our art now to service us instead of the art to challenge us…any sort of creative endeavor, since we’ve been in existence. If you were in 1600, you would go see a piece of art and you were privileged to go see it. But if you think about what you saw, the visuals were given, and it was always something greater than yourself, always something you could strive to be. It’s what Joseph Campbell talked about, it’s what the amazing people throughout the millennia talked about, something greater than oneself. Art always did that.

MR: But isn’t it the Selfie Era?

RR: Yeah, absolutely. I open an Instagram account and the majority of them are girls taking pictures of themselves, and then you see these dudes taking selfies everywhere, but it’s really interesting where that has gone. It’s an absorption of the self. If you used to be self-absorbed in the past, how many outlets could you deal with that on? Now we’re on a newer level with technology and the amount of absorption that you can have is f**king crazy. Not only can you absorb yourself in yourself, you can absorb all of the influences in life around you to yourself. You can choose the media that you can absorb, you can choose the movies, you can choose your fashion and your friends and it’s this f**king Bizarro World to me.

MR: It’s fun to glamourize and worship yourself!

RR: Absolutely! But on the flip side, and the great thing about life and the world is that everything’s a paradox. As you have that ability, there are people who are rejecting it and actually pulling out and saying, “You know what? I don’t want that.” You think about the resurgence of vinyl, you think about the resurgence of independent film and indie bands releasing records or these kinds of things and there is a movement that is growing and bubbling and it is real and they are great. There are really great bands out there. There are great bands that are out there playing and they don’t really play that game. And there are people who listen to those bands and have more respect. The harder you have to work for something, the more respect you should get. If you can walk into any store in America, hit a Shazam button and the Shazam will tell you exactly what the song is playing and then you can hit another button and all of a sudden, you own that song within three seconds. How can you have respect for that? How is that not disposable?

But if you go to a store and you buy a vinyl and you throw down physical money or a credit card, just the act of that in a living, breathing place where there’s smells, where there’s physical things that you can touch tactilely, your finger prints are on this thing and you see this album with artwork that someone took the time to make and there’s titles of songs and a gatefold. When you go home and you pull the vinyl out and put it on the turntable, something chemically happens in your brain that says, “You are experiencing something,” and you have more respect for it because it took a lot more work to do that. Listening to the record takes more work. You go to put a vinyl on and you listen to it, you’ve got to sit by it because it’s short. One side of a record is fucking short and if you get up and leave and watch TV or whatever by the time you get back your needle’s f**ked because it’s been digging into the end of the side. You have to be vigilant about it. If you’re vigilant about something, you have more respect for you’re going to pay more attention to it. It’s something that I think gives us all a deeper experience. That’s what it’s about. That’s what this record’s about. Something authentic and deep.

MR: And from a lyrical standpoint, you were clearly looking for something bigger to talk about.

RR: Oh yeah, absolutely. Universal themes that have run through humanity since the dawn of time, since people started thinking. We’ve gotten away from those things. And also spirituality, what spirituality means and where I am as a person and where we are as humans, what the f**k are we doing here? Are we literally here to just buy more s**t? It’s because, like I said, it’s so easy to just surround yourself with what’s familiar. That’s the easy way out. It’s easy to become pessimistic. It’s easy to just think, “Oh, everything sucks, everything sucks.” But the world is your perception and if you just turn your perception around and think, “Everything’s cool,” not everything does suck… There are some problems, but it’s not the problem that’s the problem, it’s how you perceive the problem, you know what I mean? In that sense, a little optimism always goes a long way.

MR: Rich, it could have been easier to just create within The Black Crowes, but you went for the solo career. It was because you wanted to say different things than what was going on with the band, right?

RR: Absolutely. Also, my brother is the mouthpiece of the Crowes and what his beliefs aren’t what my beliefs are necessarily. A lot of times when he would do press he would say a lot of things that I didn’t necessarily agree with or weren’t my position. So it’s kind of cool to get away and express myself this way. In The Crowes my expression was music, I wrote the music and Chris wrote the lyrics. Music is a more esoteric expression. There’s nothing that’s concrete in the expression of music. It’s very subconscious and ethereal and different people will get different things out of it. That’s what I love about it, but there’s also another element to that which is lyrical, and there’s also another element to expressing yourself which is being able to come out from this thing that is what it is and has been around for so long that the band is kind of stuck in it. I wanted to pull away from that and start a more free form of expression just for myself. That’s what I hoped to accomplish on the record, and all my records, but as time goes on and as I do more and get more comfortable with it I get to open up and see the light and see positivity.

MR: And it’s a ceaseless sight.

RR: Yeah, exactly.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

RR: I’ve worked with some younger bands producing and writing and the only thing that I try to tell them is whatever you do, do it for the right reason. If you write music that moves you, if you write music that’s authentic and sincere eventually someone will come around and like it, but if you only want to be a celebrity the world’s better off if you just fuck off and go do something else. Figure out another way to be a celebrity. Be on a reality TV show or whatever the f**k it is. The creation and your intention behind the creation is too important to the world. I think that people who create should feel a responsibility in their creating. You can argue whether it’s good, bad… Everyone’s going to have their opinion. Some people are going to like it, some people are going to hate it, but if your intention is true and you’re true to yourself and you write something that’s authentic and means something to you, that intention will move forth in the universe. That’s all that is lacking. If you can do that, then f**k it. Whether you’re playing in front of five people for the rest of your night or five hundred thousand people it’s still righteous because it’s coming from a more righteous place.

MR: Is this what you would have told the fifteen year-old who wrote “She Talks To Angels?”

RR: S**t, I kind of did. That was something that moved me, I wrote it and I was proud of it and it was genuine. That’s how I’ve always done it. I think there are people out there who do that, but I just think if you say, “I’m gonna go start a band,” what everyone seems to do now is focus on social media. “If I do this I’ll get fifty hits,” and then you go back to this whole selfie thing and it’s all about shameless self-promotion. “If I like this guy on Twitter then my band gets out there and the four thousand people this guy has will look at my band.” It’s almost like this weird corporate branding gone wild. It’s cross branding. “Well I like that guy and he likes me and that guy…” what it becomes is, “You do for me and I’ll do for you,” and that’s all it is. You have that and then some bands are great at videos, they have their video faces down, and then the next thing will be the social media faces and their image and the music is last. The music should come first. None of that other s**t matters. If you’re coming from a sincere place and writing music that means something to you that vibration goes out into the universe and that’s what’s righteous. If it’s meant to be the laws of attraction will attract fans to you and the fans that like you will like you because what you’re doing is not full of s**t. It’s not duping anyone, it’s not bulls**t, it’s real. That’s just how I see it.

MR: So you left because of what you had to say, what you had to get out from inside.

RR: Exactly.

MR: What does the future look like for Rich Robinson?

RR: We’re touring, obviously we have a bunch of dates coming up, it’s going to be cool, these shows are going great, the band’s really gelling well together. Joe [Magistro] and I have been playing together for ten years now, and Matt and Ted and Dan who are all in the band. We just started playing together about a month ago but it’s going really well. We’re going to focus on that, we have that going on and then we’re planning on doing another art show in the fall with my brother-in-law. We paint and do that, we’re also working on a sculpture.

MR: Do you take the paint set on the road with you?

RR: No, I work on bigger canvasses and I use oil so they wouldn’t dry. I have to sit still to do that kind of stuff.

MR: Were you always the kid who was creating things?

RR: Yeah, kind of. I would say so. It brings joy. If you follow your joy, you’re good to go.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

2014-06-20-wakeling_bryan_kremkau.gif
photo courtesy of The English Beat

A Conversation with The English Beat’s Dave Wakeling

Mike Ragogna: Dave, you’re doing a pledge campaign tied into your new album?

Dave Wakeling: We are, indeed. This pledge campaign is to attract Medicci-like benefactors who pledge to buy the album in advance for any of the exciting premiums we put in, like you can shred guitars with Dave for an afternoon or you can go for dinner with me or you can travel on the tour bus for a couple of days or travel in the van in California. We’ve always been quite close to the people who come to our concerts, we’re pretty easy to get hold of, but this takes it a step further, now. It’s quite been fun. People can come to the studio and sing on the chorus of a song, for example, and depending on how good their voice is that’s how loud it will be in the mix.

MR: What is it that you’re expecting ultimately from this?

DW: We’ve got demos of about twenty songs and we’re feeling thoroughly confident, I must say, that we’ll use those demos and play them and put the lyrics up on the pledge page. It’s a way of trying to attract people to pledging for the project by giving them access to the behind the scenes, warts and all. Well, hopefully no warts. I think it’s really quite interesting because the record company largesse is taken out in a way, isn’t it? Everybody pledges to buy an album for ten bucks and that actually pays for the studio to make the record. I like it. It’s another different thing that’s happening with the twenty-first century, isn’t it. The record industry has turned on its head somewhat. It’s still the same thing, it’s not completely different, it’s just a hundred eighty degrees different.

MR: What do you think about that? What do you think about being a band in this environment versus when you had a different recording and marketing paradigm?

DW: I prefer it. Don’t get me wrong, the record company business was terrific, but then you realized you were paying for everything a couple of years later. So that part of it wasn’t that much fun. But there was something charming about a young executive being willing to lend four alcoholics half-a-million dollars to see if they could remember any of their tunes when they get to the studio. That was very decent of them. So they did have their role, but there’s something clean about this that’s nice. It’s not all bribery and money under the table; it’s pretty straightforward. I think it’s a little bit like working live on the road, I’m now doing the traditional ceremony of playing, going home to the tour bus and I’m now at Wal-Mart buying myself flour, soup and a pair of dumb bells. I’m thinking of getting some of these kettle bells. They’re new, aren’t they? Have you ever used them?

MR: Yeah.

DW: What do you think? Do you like them?

MR: You have to be very careful to do it right, otherwise you can hit yourself in a very bad spot.

DW: [laughs] I was just trying it as you said that, it’s not good. I’m sticking with the regular blue ten-pounders and such. You can’t do that in the back of the bus. You can’t swing a cat in the back of the bus. In fact, there’s a sign, “No logs in the bog and no swinging cats,” or something like that.

MR: Are there rituals that you don’t want to violate after all these years?

DW: There are rituals, yes, but they’re all mainly to do with violation. That’s why we all end up in groups. Let’s cut to the chase here: Anybody in a group, anybody who works with groups, deals with groups, writes about groups or even goes to watch groups and listens to music are basically a sociopath. Something happened at a very young age that made us run to music from the awful pressures to whatever it was that was going on outside. Take all that with a pinch of salt. That’s all we risk now, is a pinch of salt. We can’t risk anything stronger than that now.

MR: The English Beat is considered one of the great ska bands, though your music has other influences like punk and reggae.

DW: We wanted to mix it up, you know? We wanted a punky reggae party and it came out very similar to a ska beat, sort of up-four peppy beat with an equal off beat hitting with the on beat. On this new album I’m to try to see if I can get what I originally wanted: I wanted the Velvet Underground jamming with Toots & The Maytals. That’s what I wanted. I wanted the urban angst that I felt from Birmingham, but I wanted the uplifting sense of life and joy and survival from Toots & The Maytals’ rhythm section. I wanted those two bands jamming together and then I would sing over the top of course like Bryan Ferry or Van Morrisson or one of those.

MR: In the United States, your music was featured in High Fidelity, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off…

DW: …and Clueless, that’s the big one. “Tenderness” was in Clueless, and then you’ve got Gross Pointe Blank and then the Scooby Doo episode entitled “Dance Of The Undead,” which is probably my greatest artistic creation to date, frankly. There are two songs in this battle of the bands and the songs are so well-matched against each other it takes Scooby Doo to come in on all fours–or the two back ones, anyway–shredding guitar to win it for the Hex Girls versus the power of the song we wrote. That was really one of my proudest moments.

MR: There’s something about The English Beat meeting Scooby Doo that just seems right.

DW: I met one of the original writers who drew me a very nice picture and he told me a lot of stories about those original sessions at Hanna-Barbara in the valley, and I’m right on the same page. I knew it even as a kid, but when I checked, yep, I knew it.

MR: When you look at The English Beat now versus when you started it, what are the differences?

DW: I never guessed that I would write a song that anybody would hear other than the other people who were stupid enough to join a pop group with me. So for them to come out and for people to like the songs and it goes on for a few years and then really famous people cover your songs and it’s still on the radio when it’s twenty or thirty years later, it really is the greatest gift that a troubadour could ever hope for. You hope to wander round the world singing your odes or whatever they are and you hope that you touch hearts along the way. I’m honored and sort of humbled, which is weird for me. I don’t get humbled that often. Only by women. They’re very good at humbling me.

MR: Are any of the songs in particular that you love to play live?

DW: Yeah! Especially these last couple of weeks, because I just started talking to a producer called Dubmatix, out of Toronto. We started working up some versions from the demos and I’m just on fire with it. He’s a great musician and he’s got a ton of really good samples. I heard stuff while I was writing the songs and I wanted to include it to set the mood and the atmosphere. There’s a song called “Said We Would Never Die,” and in my head as I was singing it, I could hear a breathing machine in an ICU and I heard an old-fashioned sixties black and white English movie ambulance siren and the beep-beep of the machines, and it made an orchestra of medical emergency sounds. We’ve been working on that this last couple of days and he’s done a fantastic job. I told him, “Black and white English movie rainy day ambulance siren” and it was just the absolute perfect one. You could almost see the film. [siren noises] “I say, sir, are you having some trouble? Tally-ho! White Hall double two, double two!”

MR: Do you feel like modern technology has actually enhanced The Beats’ sound or creativity?

DW: I think it’s enhanced everything. It’s allowed the classic songs to get more life and breath and radio stations with wider and deeper playlists have ended up championing some of the songs. They weren’t always top forty monsters at the time, IRS records hadn’t really joined that game. We were college darlings and we made top two hundred on the billboard chart quite often, so we felt jealous at the time, I’ll be honest, because a lot of songs that were getting that top forty push weren’t as good. The massive hits rode more on the strength of their haircuts than their lyrics I thought. But anyway, you soaked it up, and the shows did well and our albums did well, but we never made any singles business. Now I feel happier with each year because I get to hear more and more of our songs on classic rock radio and I hear less and less of the ones that seemed like they were just trying it on at the time. “Wear this shirt, it should sound like this shirt.” “Okay, I’ve got it.” It just seemed a little slavish. Certainly I was jealous and now I don’t feel so bad about it because our songs have prevailed and of course I got a couple of really nice mentions. I always thought I was going to have to pay somebody to say it, but they brought out a best-of box set, a very nicely done job by Shout! Factory. Rolling Stone gave it a smashing review and said, “Wittily savage as Costello.” It was like, “Hello, there we go, me and Declan on the same page. Exactly. We just did a tour in England and a fellow from The Quietus magazine enjoyed the show, thank heavens, and said I was to be spoken of in the same breath as the greats of the genre; Weller, Strummer, Wakeling, which sounds like a company of accountants, doesn’t it? But it had a ring to me. Weller, Strummer, Costello, Wakeling. Yeah, there you go, that’s what I always thought. [laughs]

So here we are, I’m really glad that I still have both knees operating, I can still skank, I’m singing better than ever, which is remarkable, and enjoying myself on stage more than ever. The band is tighter than it’s ever been, there’s a really nice vibe. I just got on the bus today and everybody’s thrilled because they got a big wide bunk bed instead of a narrow one, so they’re all thrilled. I’m nearly at the end of my Wal-Mart ritual, I didn’t really buy much, some soup, some fruit, some almonds and walnuts, a kettle, an ab-roller. I have some remedial work to do, to be honest. I stopped drinking rather abruptly last September–again. I lost an enormous amount of weight, but sadly the weight didn’t send a message to my skin that it wasn’t needed so I’ve got to work on my tummy next. it’s a shame, it was just the right size when I was overweight from the beer, When I had a pot belly, the skin was just perfectly formed around it and quite soft. Now, oh dear, no. So I’ve given myself a challenge, frankly, there’s a lot of stuff going on between now and the record coming out in February and one of the things is I’m going to get this stomach looking great or else I’m going to get it made to look great. The challenge is on, I’m going to see what I can do.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

DW: Well, you have to work on a song all night until the hairs go up on your neck. If the hairs don’t go up on your neck, don’t put any more time into that one. If you’re going to try and write something that moves other people, you have to write something that has quite a dramatic effect on yourself. It has to give you quite a jolt when you write it, “Whoa, blimey! That’s a little edgy, Dave!” Or it makes you cry or you might be crying when you write it. So it has to be loaded with emotion. You don’t want to waste a word in a song, really. One bad line’s enough to take away the power of the two around it. You have to weigh every word. It takes me about ten minutes to write a song and then about nine months to finish it. That can include a week, really, of wondering if something should be sung as a semi colon or a comma, and I just drive myself nuts over it. You can’t sleep, you’re wandering around chain-smoking, “What’s the matter?” “Oh, nothing!” You don’t dare tell them it’s because you don’t know whether to use the word “yet” or “but.” [laughs] But it seems important at the time. I just think the nicest things are complicated things that come across as simple. What I really dislike is really simple things that are all tarted-up to look really complicated. That’s something I think you need to do. You need to put an enormous amount of work into it to make it feel effortless. That’s probably true for everything, but it’s definitely true for writing a song.

MR: What does the future look like for David Wakeling and for The English Beat?

DW: I’m doing everything that I want, I can’t imagine doing anything else. At the moment, I think I’m just intrigued by, “How do we make this record?” How do you make a statement that resonates with people who liked your records thirty years ago and still might but are different? And at the same time, how do you make a record that sounds like it’s this year? In the same way as in 1979, I didn’t want to sound like it was 1963 from Kingston, Jamaica. Now I don’t want to sound like Birmingham in 1979 because I want to be from California in 2014, so that’s the challenge–how to finesse that. That’s keeping me excited at the moment. One of the funniest bits of songwriting is the presentation. You’ve got somebody who’s got every sound in the world as a sample at their fingertips and they say, “Right, 1963 ambulance with a Boeing jet and two eggs frying,” and he can just do that and sing over the top of it. With the more options you’ve got the more diligence you’ve got to have. With each new idea for a song, on goes the headphoens and you’ve got to try and feel what that part does to me whilst I’m singing it and carefully think about instrumentation. I think with this record I wanted to try and make it so the vocals and the melodies are what come straight at you and everything else is around it dramatically to support and project. I think there are some really great pop records being made at the moment that manage to do that quite well and not necessarily having a whole band going, “One, two, three, four,” and everybody just starts at the beginning and stops at the end. They’re going to be constructive songs that have the minimum amount of support to make it appear effortless. It’s going to take an enormous amount of hard work to get to that point but we’ll get it. “Let the songs lead the way,” is what we normally say. “Does that make the hair go up on your neck more, or less?” If it makes the hair go up more you’re probably on the right track.

MR: Nice. We talked about a lot of things, is there something we didn’t cover?

DW: No, I’ve been busily going down the cleaning aisle and there’s not much controversy there. You’ll be pleased to know that Wal-Marts are starting to get a number of more organic and planetary options. I managed to get some surface wipes that are just made of lemongrass and thyme. Even at Wal-Mart they’re starting to be different.

MR: Guess everything evolves.

DW: You know, apart from me, sometimes. I get stuck. But yeah, just like Huffington Post, I remember when that started I was like, “Oh, that’s quite a good idea!” Now, it’s like the biggest news thing in the world. It’s kind of nice with all those correspondents and people being able to get involved and connect. It’s a bit like this pledge thing. They’re early days yet but I think it’s a sign of new society. To be honest, I don’t know whether we’ll have a chance to see it through. Some of the naysayers would rather stand in the jolly-good circle and execute each other. Shoot some sense into each other, that’s the only language some people understand. We might have to deal with that bunch, but there are some very interesting evolutionary changes going on. But my kids in California, for example, I find them very interesting because they don’t refer to any of their friends by what color they are. They don’t notice. It’s not a point of reference now. For my parents, it was a point of reference on who you didn’t speak to. “Oh, is that your black friend, then?” But now they don’t notice. They’re in the California sunshine so they’re all kind of the same color anyway, but they don’t notice. I just think that’s amazing. You sit in and listen sometimes, and the contents of their character is more important than the color of their skin. That’s how teenagers are now in America, that’s evolution.

MR: It’s a great thing. It seems like the people who will just go down swinging on stuff like that are people who were born in a certain era and they’ve seemed to all gravitated to these paranoid, fringe associations.

DW: I think you’re right. But things are moving generally in the right direction, though like you say, some people are afraid of social change. Most often, they’re people who have been brainwashed by their parents in one way or the other. I think they’re fascinating times and thank heavens we’ve got stuff like Pledge Music and stuff like Huffington Post and all sorts of different ways now to share and create information, which I think is all for the good. I’m pleasantly excited. And I’m pleased that I’ve done a very specific Wal-Mart run. I haven’t bought any junk food. I used to have somebody come to Wal-Mart with me and we always used to end up with four hundred bucks worth of junk food, but I haven’t got any junk food at all tonight, I’ve got fruit and nuts and healthy organic soups, I even bought a box of green tea but we’ll see about that. Only if all the rest of the tea and the coffee’s run out. But no, we’re going to try it, come on.

MR: I wish you luck with everything. The album’s coming in February?

DW: Yes, but if you go onto the pledge site we’re going to start putting up demos of the songs and lyrics of the songs and we’ll be showing little bits from the studio. From now, anybody who wants to pledge to buy the album or any of the other fancy prizes get to watch an inside scoop as it were on the making of the record and the demos and even interviews.

MR: This has been wonderful. I really appreciate your time, and let’s chat again in February when the album comes out!

DW: That would be great, man! It’s going to come out ostensibly the seventeenth, which is equidistant between my birthday on the nineteenth and Valentine’s on the fourteenth. I thought that was an auspicious week, so that’s what we’re aiming for. Who knows when it really comes out? When it’s done. That’s the plan, some time around then.

MR: Thank you so much for your time, Dave!

DW: Absolutely perfect timing, all the stuff’s being put into the Wal-Mart bag. That was good, I managed to do all my shopping and I spoke to a very nice fellow who contributes to one of the most powerful news media organizations in the world. You get to do some good things when you’re a singer.

MR: Oh, you…

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

2014-06-20-2922.jpg

A Conversation with Leela James

Mike Ragogna: Leela, how did your stint as a star on TV One’s RnBDivas LA come about?

Leela James: My experience doing the RnBDivas L.A. show was great, challenging, unexpected. I figured I knew what to expect, and I didn’t. Without giving up too much, let’s just say I look forward to it airing.

MR: Just how cool are Chante Moore, Lil’ Mo, Michel’le and Claudette Ortiz to work with?

LJ: For the most part it was cool working with everyone on the show.

MR: You received the 2008 Soul Train Music Award for Best R&B/Soul or Rap Artist of 2008. In 2014, what do you think “R&B” and “Soul” mean these days?

LJ: Soul music, however cliché this might sound, is really just music that comes from the soul, and is meant for the soul. To me, soul music is the same today as it was yesterday; soul music doesn’t change, the people that sing it changes.

MR: Does the “reality” element of the show stay pretty real or does it rely pretty equally on scripted dramas, etc., you know, the way virtually every other reality show exists?

LJ: Every reality show is different, and I can only speak to my experience doing RnBDivas. I can tell you it’s real.

MR: Your latest video for your hit “Say That” features Anthony Hamilton. How did this come together?

LJ: Anthony Hamilton and I always talked about working together over the years, and this time things just fell into place and we were able to make it happen. So much in the music world–and I guess in the world in general–is timing.

MR: Your last album was a tribute to Etta James, and you were called “Baby Etta” as a child. How were you originally introduced to her music and just how inspirational was she to your creative growth and who are some of your other influences?

LJ: Fortunately, I was exposed to all kinds of music growing up, and Etta James stood out as one of my favorite artists. I was inspired by the sound of her strong voice, I remember it hitting me like a wave.

MR: What was the tipping point where you made the decision you had to be a musical artist full time?

LJ: I decided I wanted to be an artist full time the day I got a standing ovation as child after singing at talent show. The look in the eyes of the people applauding for me made we want to continue singing for as long as I could.

MR: Does the “acting” portion of the TV show put any kind of surprising demands on you?

LJ: Trying to balance the TV world with my music world was the only challenge for me. In TV, the schedules are strict and the hours are long, and you’re not always allowed to be the creative one. Sometimes, you just follow directions. What’s interesting is that on television there is no real sense of impending reward; In music, the hours are crazy as well but there is instant gratification when you perform at the end of the day.

MR: Leela, what advice do you have for new artists?

LJ: I would advise new artists to simply try and perfect their craft. Keep working, keep writing, keep training. Also, when they are ready for it, acquire a strong team.

MR: Is there anything creatively that you’re thinking of experimenting with in the near future and when is your new album coming?

LJ: You’ll just have to wait and see! My new album Fall For You will be available July 8!

SIN COS TAN’S “LOVE SEES NO COLOUR”

Sin Cos Tan is the musical partnership of producer-DJ Jori Hulkkonen–Pet Shop Boys´Chris Lowe, Jose Gonzalez and Tiga–and Juho Paalosmaa, songwriter and vocalist from the group Villa Nah. They make upbeat pop music that features spiraling synths and catchy lyrics. The band’s forthcoming album Blown Away – an album about a middle-aged American whose life takes a 180 after joining a Mexican drug cartel – is out in August.

Jori Hulkkonen from Sin Cos Tan says, “When we were writing the songs for the album, I tried to turn all my ‘safeties off,’ so to speak; there’s no such thing as ‘too uplifting’ or ‘too big’ when it comes to a chorus. With ‘Love Sees No Colour,’ we wanted to write a feel-good song that would work as a stand alone single for the summer, but when in the context of the album, the slightly darker twist would be more obvious.”


Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Hot Tip Alert!

Click here for more.

Chastity Lynn & Billy Glide

Chastity Lynn & Billy Glide Chastity Lynn has deep anal on her mind and Billy Glide is just the man to fill that tight hole
Click to See More Penthouse Pics of Chastity Lynn & Billy Glide

Latest Galleries at Penthouse.com

Evelyn Lin & Billy Hart

Evelyn Lin & Billy Hart Evelyn Lin has some work to do but a hard hat is only the beginning of what she is getting from Billy Hart
Click to See More Penthouse Pics of Evelyn Lin & Billy Hart

Latest Galleries at Penthouse.com

Charisma Cappelli Gives Billy a Foot Job Before Riding His Cock!

Thumbnail-0f4a883bf8c09057d5c1f15c761c07ce

Thumbnail-e0c9c8bb20ad7d1d76ae1d2bab65883b

Thumbnail-88abea782297da2c25fe6d278ced8e8d

Big titty blonde, Charisma Cappelli, gives her man a foot job before getting her tight hole fucked in absolutely amazing positions! She hops off his cock only to let him cum all over her perfectly painted toes!

For all videos of this model with cool ass on Legaction.com now!

Legaction.com RSS Feed