Virgil Abloh Joins Evian as ‘Creative Adviser’

PARIS — Virgil Abloh has added a new role to his CV: creative adviser for sustainable innovation design at Evian.
The founder of Off-White and creative director of Louis Vuitton’s men’s line is to help the mineral water company, owned by Danone, make its design process more sustainable.
“Evian is an iconic brand with a strong heritage in fashion and creativity,” the designer said in a statement. “Its sustainability ambitions align with my own. Together we can push boundaries and explore new areas of revolution, paving a better future for generations globally.”
The announcement comes as Evian steps toward its goal of becoming a 100 percent circular brand by 2025: By this date, the company aims for all its water bottles to be made out of recycled plastic.
According to the statement, Abloh will both help design Evian future products and “use his wide-scale platform to engage his audience and raise awareness around the importance of innovation in design and sustainability.”
Announcing the collaboration via its Instagram account, Evian playfully riffed on Abloh’s signature quotation marks: on a makeshift Evian business card, the designer’s name is followed by his new title, “Creative Adviser.”
“Virgil is a creative innovator who has a degree in civil engineering and a

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Lanvin Said in Talks With Bruno Sialelli for Creative Role

NEW FACE AT LANVIN?: Could Lanvin, said to be searching for new designer, have its eye on a hidden talent? According to sources, the French house is in talks with Bruno Sialelli, who recently exited Loewe, where he was head of men’s wear. The likelihood of the house and the designer securing an agreement could not immediately be learned. Lanvin could not immediately be reached for comment.
According to his LinkedIn profile, Sialelli had been at Loewe since March 2016. Before that, he held senior design roles in women’s wear at Paco Rabanne, Acne Studios and Balenciaga. He is a fashion graduate of Studio Berçot in Paris.
Finding a new design and management leadership has been job number one for Fosun International, which acquired the French luxury house in February.
WWD was the first to report in July that Lanvin had settled on Jean-Philippe Hecquet to become its next chief executive officer. Previously, he was head of fast-growing French fashion chain Sandro since 2014, and boasts more than 14 years of experience in various roles at LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton.
In March, Lanvin parted ways with creative director Olivier Lapidus and general manager Nicolas Druz, sparking speculation about who might take on the daunting

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Creative In Focus – Getty Images

Getty Images - Creative In Focus  artwork

Creative In Focus

Getty Images

Genre: Photography

Publish Date: July 1, 2014

Publisher: Getty Images

Seller: Getty Images


Welcome to Getty Images ‘Creative In Focus’, the photography trendbook looking over the shoulder of the present, to get a glimpse of the new ideas and flavours we expect imagery to grow into over the next year. Keeping track of the information that moves across our desktops and smartphones is a challenge we pick up at Getty Images every day; new technologies transform how we work and play, changing the nature, number and quality of our relationships. This shift is due to pictures.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

Lacoste Names Louise Trotter As Creative Director

PARIS – Lacoste has named Louise Trotter as creative director.
The former Joseph designer succeeds Felipe Oliveira Baptista, who parted ways with the French heritage sportswear brand in May. Trotter, the first female creative director at the brand, will present her first collection during Paris Fashion Week in February, Lacoste said.
“We are very happy to welcome Louise. Her visionary approach on lines and materials, as well as her expertise in creating highly technical pieces, will be real assets to strengthen the positioning of our collections,” said Lacoste chief excutive officer Thierry Guibert, who wants to refocus the brand on its sports roots.
“I am delighted to join this French brand with such a unique heritage. For 85 years, the modernity of the Lacoste style has resided in this singular fusion of sport and fashion. I am proud to contribute to the writing of a new chapter in its history,” said Trotter.
The designer joined Joseph in 2009 from the British high street label Jigsaw, where she also held the title of creative director. Before Jigsaw, she served as senior vice president, creative director of H Hilfiger. She was previously vice president of product design and development for women’s merchandise at Gap brand.
During her

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
Milanoo.com Ltd

To the Best of Our Knowledge: Creative Writing – Jim Fleming

Jim Fleming - To the Best of Our Knowledge: Creative Writing  artwork

To the Best of Our Knowledge: Creative Writing

Jim Fleming

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: February 19, 2014

© ℗ © 2014 Wisconsin Public Radio (To the Best of Our Knowledge)

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Creative Arts Emmys 2018: Complete List of Winners

Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. MaiselThe 2018 Creative Arts Emmys are finally here!
The annual ceremony honors outstanding artistic and technical achievement across a variety of television genres. Like last year, the award…


E! Online (US) – Top Stories
Entertainment News! –

Explore the world of Hustler today! Click now and enjoy…

Explore REAL today for the most erotic amateur sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Visit VCAXX Classics for the classics in adult entertainment at its best! Click now!

Hustler Taboo features the kinkiest sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Kanye West Creative Directs Pornhub Awards and Releases New Song with Lil Pump

Kanye West has taken his talents to the XXX screen — he’s the creative director for the Pornhub Awards — and he’s got his hand in just about every aspect of the show.  Thursday night’s inaugural show will be presented in VR live from The Belasco…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Fashion


Here’s How Hollywood Makes Literally Every Creative Decision

By CRACKED Readers  Published: August 17th, 2018 


Cracked: All Posts

IMG Extends Focus, a Full-Service Creative and Event Production Company

IMG’S NEW FOCUS: IMG is formalizing the development of a full-service creative and event production company called Focus. The company aims to bring original events and bespoke brand experiences to life.
Focus looks to offer new clients access to leading fashion events, venues, models and talent, along with the creative network of Endeavor, IMG’s parent company. Focus specializes in planning and executing fashion shows and events, as well as consulting and creative direction.
Dominic Kaffka, vice president of creative and production at IMG, will lead the new enterprise, in addition to his current role. Since 2015, he has played an instrumental role in New York Fashion Week: The Shows, overseeing creative direction and event production.
Previously, Focus has produced events for limited clients with its own properties, and hasn’t worked with external clients to execute their visions, Kaffka said. It is now seeking outside business.
“We realize there’s a real opportunity in different markets globally. We thought it made sense to go public about it,” he said. Right now he’s marketing Focus through word of mouth and personal connections. “We don’t want to scale it up too fast and too large. It’s really organic growth within the next 12 to 18 months,” he said.
The roots

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

ABC Orders ‘Roseanne’ Spinoff With ‘No Financial Or Creative Involvement’ From Roseanne Barr

The Conners are coming back to TV. Mere weeks after ABC’s “Roseanne” revival was canceled to due a racist tweet from its star, Roseanne Barr, the company announced that a spinoff called “The Conners” had been greenlit and would premiere in the fall. Find out which members of the original cast will be back for the new sitcom.


Access Hollywood Latest Videos

Vejas Kruszewski Tapped as Creative Director of New Leather Brand

PARIS — Landing the top designer gig at a heritage fashion house may be the goal for many of the industries’ rising talents, but 21-year-old Canadian wunderkind Vejas Kruszewski has taken another tack by signing on as creative director of Pihakapi, a brand from Italian leather apparel producer Pellemoda.
A by-appointment presentation of the brand’s debut fall collection is set to take place during Paris men’s fashion week later this month.
Kruszewski, who has been working closely with Pellemoda for his own experimental label, Vejas, said accepting the role felt like “a natural progression, or at least a choice that made sense,” adding: “I liked that it was a little unconventional, the fact that a manufacturer wants to have its own brand….What I have always liked about making clothes is all of the processes related to the manufacturing, and they have the breadth of expertise because of the clients that they produce for.”
Founded in 1979, Pellemoda is said to produce leather apparel for brands including Dior, Coach, Céline, Balenciaga and Calvin Klein.
For now the self-taught designer is putting his brand — launched in 2015 at age 18 — on hold. The label counts around 30 wholesale clients including Browns and Harvey Nichols in

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
Milanoo.com Ltd

Lane Crawford Opens Creative Call to Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA COOL–Luxury department store Lane Crawford wants to meet up-and-coming creatives in Los Angeles. For its seventh edition of its talent call, the influential retailer’s buying team will head to the city in January to scout emerging designers, brands, and artistic talent across a wide variety of categories.
The Los Angeles hunt marks the the seventh edition of the incubator, first launched in 2015, and is the first time it has been extended outside of China. Conceived to help revolutionize Lane Crawford’s buying model, brands that do not present their collections in traditional markets, showrooms, and fashion weeks will have an opportunity to connect directly, and it also targets creatives such as photographers, stylists, writers and multimedia content creators.
Applications, which are open now, are submitted via the Lane Crawford website with a judging panel scheduled at the 3.1 Phillip Lim on Third Street from Jan. 24 to 26. Once accepted, participants will get access to a range of benefits and career support from Lane Crawford’s team of experts.

Part of the Lane Crawford Joyce Group, the department store is a key channel for brands to break into the Chinese market. 
Courtesy

“These include an onboarding program that covers legal administration, logistics, payment processes, account

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Creative Conceptions Releases Chemin du Plaisir

Following the success of its adult board game Path to Pleasure, Creative Conceptions is reviving the French original, Chemin du Plaisir.
XBIZ.com – Pleasure & Retail

Creative Conceptions Releases Predictive Pecker

Creative Conceptions has announced the release of the Predictive Pecker, a “sexual fortune teller.”
XBIZ.com – Pleasure & Retail

Creative Conceptions Releases ‘Sex Marks the Spot’

Creative Conceptions has announced the release of Sex Marks the Spot, a game of chance where “all roads lead to romance and raunchiness.”
XBIZ.com – Pleasure & Retail

NYFF: Don Cheadle Defends Creative Liberties in Story and Music of Miles Davis Biopic

“What we all know in these real stories is that to some degree, they are all historical fiction, everyone is taking poetic license because clearly you can’t encapsulate a person’s life in 90 minutes.”
Music News Headlines – Yahoo News

Mulberry Marks Launch of New Book on Creative London

BURNING OUT? Mulberry and its new creative director Johnny Coca hosted the launch of one very weighty tome about London’s buzzing creative community — and its future.
“London Burning: Portraits From a Creative City” is a snapshot of the state of fashion, art, cinema, theatre, music, architecture and technology edited by the writer and publisher Hossein Amirsadeghi and the editor Maryam Eisler.
Published by Thames & Hudson, it contains more than 100 new interviews with the likes of Nicholas Serota, director of Tate; Antony Gormley; Gilbert & George; Fergus Henderson and Ruthie Rogers; Alexandra Shulman; Grayson Perry; and Coca himself, who said it was “exhilarating” to take part in the project.
“I’m fascinated by the creativity of others — and instinctively support projects that celebrate it,” said Coca, who saw his inclusion in the book as a “true welcome” back to London, where he has worked before, and taught fashion students at Central Saint Martins.
The event took place at the Institute of Contemporary Arts with guests including Saffron Aldridge, Bethan Laura Wood, Mollie Dent Brocklehurst, Mark Hix, Mat Collishaw and Ron Arad. Artists including Delilah, Jordan Stephens of Rizzle Kicks, Natalia Kremen, NTS Radio and Charlie Siem performed.
However, some troubling issues emerged during

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Teen Technorati – The LEGO Challenge: Creative Problem-Solving

In this episode of Teen Technorati, the 40 finalists are split up into teams and tasked with building a bridge made out of LEGO. Only one team emerges as the winner, but during the challenge the finalists’ leadership and problem-solving skills begin to surface. Plus, fellowship hopefuls Ishaan Gulrajani, Lucy Guo, Darby Schumacher, and Catherine Ray explain the concepts behind their individual Thiel projects.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

Williams Trading Offering Creative Conceptions Ltd. Discount

Creative Conceptions Ltd., is now available at Williams Trading Co. for 30 percent off of the full line until Sept. 30.
XBIZ.com | Top Stories

Julianne Hough and Fiancé Brooks Laich Show PDA Before Creative Arts Emmys Winners Are Announced

The big Primetime Emmy Awards ceremony may be one week away, but that won’t stop some of Hollywood’s most talented stars from walking away with a special trophy a little bit…


E! Online (US) – Top Stories
Entertainment News! –

Explore the world of Hustler today! Click now and enjoy…

Explore REAL today for the most erotic amateur sex online! Click now and enjoy!

Visit VCAXX Classics for the classics in adult entertainment at its best! Click now!

Hustler Taboo features the kinkiest sex online! Click now and enjoy!

A Glimpse Into the Creative Writing Process

At about 11 PM last night, I was locking my doors and turning out the lights to go to bed. It had been a long day, mostly work. My mind was everywhere, as usual, flitting from one topic to another, as my body, operating mostly on habit, went through its evening routine.

Suddenly, and for no particular reason that I can identify, a thought started forming in my head. It wasn’t a normal one. I knew that right away. I had an almost tactile sensation of the thought trying to birth itself by collecting language around it to form a sentence. It felt as if I heard the sentence – in the way you hear yourself think – before I had a sense of its meaning. 

All of this lasted three seconds, at most. The thought was born fully-formed, which is rare for me. Most thoughts start raw and need refinement. Not this one. There was something different about it from the start. But what? I could almost feel it trying to get out of my body.

I pulled out my phone and tweeted it. By then my body was vibrating.

image

And then I went to bed.

I woke up to find that my tweet might be among the most viral things I have ever written (although it is still early). And I don’t know where the thought came from. It simply appeared in my head. Or at least that is my experience of it.

When people ask me where I get my ideas, I have lots of writerly answers for that. I usually talk about inhaling stimulation from the environment and exhaling some of it back with a creative flare. Sometimes I say I copy other art, but do it so poorly that it looks original. Sometimes I say people send me ideas by email, but those are only broad topic suggestions. Sometimes I say I was born with the right wiring for creativity. Sometimes I say creativity is like a muscle that you can exercise, and I exercise it every day for my job, so that must help, I would think.

But all of that blah, blah really speaks to the craft part of creativity. Creativity is the part you do intentionally. Art is the part you discover. Or in this case, it discovered me.

The experience I described from last night is uncommon for me, but only because of the high wattage. When I write, I am running a program in my mind that checks the logic and grammar of my writing, of course. But I am also monitoring all of my thoughts for their visceral impact. In other words, I tune my physical body to feel words and ideas. My body is the instrument that identifies the x-factor, not my mind. If you don’t feel an idea in your body, no one else will either.

If you want to inform, write with your mind. If you want to move people, write with your body.

Scott

Follow me on Twitter at: @ScottAdamsSays

Note: Yes, I know all the “feeling” happens in my head. But you know what I meant. And that is your bonus writing tip for the day: Sometimes writing it wrong is writing it better.

If you want to see a book that has plenty of body-writing, see my book on systems versus goals. A book of this sort is only useful if it moves people to action, so I went heavy on the body-writing.

image


Scott Adams Blog

Annette Worsley-Taylor, Former Creative Director of London Fashion Week, Dies at 71

LONDON — Annette Worsley-Taylor, a former creative director of London Fashion Week who helped reignite global interest in British fashion, died this week at the age of 71. The cause of her death was lung cancer, a British Fashion Council spokesman said.
Worsley-Taylor was a driving force in establishing London Fashion Week. After launching the New Wave exhibition at London’s Ritz Hotel in 1974, in order to introduce young British designers to the international market, she went on to found London Designer Collections in 1975. After establishing the collections, the executive went on to win funding from the British government’s Department of Trade and Industry, to support a newly formed British Fashion Council. After that, Worsley-Taylor established the London Designer Show in 1990, which the BFC called a “prototype” for London Fashion Week in its current form.
A combination of the seemingly scatty yet surprisingly steely, the tireless Worsley-Taylor was an integral part of the renaissance of London fashion in the early Eighties when the likes of BodyMap, Katharine Hamnett, Betty Jackson and, later, Rifat Özbek and John Galliano put the British capital back on the global fashion map as their shows became must-sees for international retailers. She remained a champion of

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWD
Milanoo.com Ltd

Brad Goreski Named Creative Director of C. Wonder


Rachel Zoe’s former assistant is following in her stylist-turned-designer footsteps.

read more



Style

Thomas Wylde Appoints Creative Director Jene Park

THOMAS WYLDE APPOINTS JENE PARK AS CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Thomas Wylde LLC has appointed chief operating officer Jene Park as creative director for its signature collection as well as the contemporary line Thomas Wylde Los Angeles.
Park, who has been with the Los Angeles-based brand since 2006, will oversee all brand, image, product and design teams. Prior to Thomas Wylde, Park ran her own design, development and production consulting company with clients including Vera Wang, St. John and Vince. Prior to that she worked at BCBG Max Azria Group. Park’s first signature collection will be presented at IMG’s New York Fashion Week on Sept. 16 at 11:00 a.m. The new collection will retain some of the original line’s signatures such as leather, cashmere and printed silks, as seen on Cameron Diaz in “The Counselor,” while adding lace, embroidery and high-tech fabric treatments. Park is also busy readying the brand’s new handbag and shoe collections, also debuting for spring 2016.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWD » Jennifer Aniston Weds Justin Theroux with Jennifer Meyer Wedding Bands
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Critic’s Notebook: ‘Pixels’ Puts Final Nail in Adam Sandler’s Creative Coffin


Currently hip comic performers like Amy Schumer, Louis C.K., Lena Dunham and Melissa McCarthy make Adam Sandler look dumb and dated in comparison — but he’s been making this bed for himself for a long time.

read more


Hollywood Reporter

Skin Stenciling: Creative Ways to Make Your Mark

Learn how to mark your submissive’s skin with marks (not markers), in a deliberate, artistic manner that remains distinctly visible for hours but is non-permanent. Danarama shows you the obscure but long-practiced craft and skill of stenciling through impact play. Stencil shapes you cut from sheets of craft foam, or by placing padded decals, you can use various impact implements, such a paddles, hair brushes, even a riding crop to raise a temporary welt on your partner’s skin the shape of your stencil. Stencil numbers, Your name, animal shapes, logos, and more right onto their but cheeks, arms, chest, belly, or legs. Surprisingly little pain is required to make results that last for hours, and then disappear. Also learn stenciling with cut-out paddles and advanced techniques for stenciling using carefully-applied sparks from a violet wand.
Kink University Gallery Update

Skin Stenciling: Creative Ways to Make Your Mark

Learn how to mark your submissive’s skin with marks (not markers), in a deliberate, artistic manner that remains distinctly visible for hours but is non-permanent. Danarama shows you the obscure but long-practiced craft and skill of stenciling through impact play. Stencil shapes you cut from sheets of craft foam, or by placing padded decals, you can use various impact implements, such a paddles, hair brushes, even a riding crop to raise a temporary welt on your partner’s skin the shape of your stencil. Stencil numbers, Your name, animal shapes, logos, and more right onto their but cheeks, arms, chest, belly, or legs. Surprisingly little pain is required to make results that last for hours, and then disappear. Also learn stenciling with cut-out paddles and advanced techniques for stenciling using carefully-applied sparks from a violet wand.
Kink University Gallery Update

Skin Stenciling: Creative Ways to Make Your Mark

Learn how to mark your submissive’s skin with marks (not markers), in a deliberate, artistic manner that remains distinctly visible for hours but is non-permanent. Danarama shows you the obscure but long-practiced craft and skill of stenciling through impact play. Stencil shapes you cut from sheets of craft foam, or by placing padded decals, you can use various impact implements, such a paddles, hair brushes, even a riding crop to raise a temporary welt on your partner’s skin the shape of your stencil. Stencil numbers, Your name, animal shapes, logos, and more right onto their but cheeks, arms, chest, belly, or legs. Surprisingly little pain is required to make results that last for hours, and then disappear. Also learn stenciling with cut-out paddles and advanced techniques for stenciling using carefully-applied sparks from a violet wand.
Kink University Gallery Update

Skin Stenciling: Creative Ways to Make Your Mark

Learn how to mark your submissive’s skin with marks (not markers), in a deliberate, artistic manner that remains distinctly visible for hours but is non-permanent. Danarama shows you the obscure but long-practiced craft and skill of stenciling through impact play. Stencil shapes you cut from sheets of craft foam, or by placing padded decals, you can use various impact implements, such a paddles, hair brushes, even a riding crop to raise a temporary welt on your partner’s skin the shape of your stencil. Stencil numbers, Your name, animal shapes, logos, and more right onto their but cheeks, arms, chest, belly, or legs. Surprisingly little pain is required to make results that last for hours, and then disappear. Also learn stenciling with cut-out paddles and advanced techniques for stenciling using carefully-applied sparks from a violet wand.
Kink University Gallery Update

T. Riley: In C – Terry Riley & Members of the Creative & Performing Arts at SUNY-Buffalo

Terry Riley & Members of the Creative & Performing Arts at SUNY-Buffalo - T. Riley: In C  artwork

T. Riley: In C

Terry Riley & Members of the Creative & Performing Arts at SUNY-Buffalo

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: March 24, 2009

© ℗ Originally released 1968 Sony Music Entertainment / (P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Style Notes: Abercrombie & Fitch Nabs ‘Lucky’ Mag’s Former Creative Director; Target Cuts 140 HQ Jobs


Fashion stories to read while you procrastinate Father’s Day shopping (sorry, Dad).

read more





Style

Dressing 9 to 5–What the Most Stylish Women Wear to Work: Steven Alan Creative Director Aï Bihr

by HAYLEY PHELAN | edited by ANNY CHOI

2015-06-15-1434402887-9102904-aibihr9to5holding.jpg
Photo: Cedric Bihr

When it comes to building her wardrobe, Aï Bihr certainly has a lot of options. As Steven Alan’s creative director, Bihr has a whole store’s worth of goodies right at her fingertips — and is in the enviable position of being able to actually create exactly the kind of garment she’d like to wear. And if that wasn’t enough to make you wish you were in her shoes, Bihr speaks multiple languages, has lived in Tokyo, Paris, Los Angeles, and New York, holds degrees in both neuroscience and pattern-making. Here, she gives us the scoop on what she wears to work.

More: Dressing 9 to 5–What the Most Stylish Women Wear to Work: Art-Tech Startup Founder Alexandra Chemla

Test Market

On a work day, I try to wear mostly Steven Alan because it’s good for me to wear what we’ve made; if we need to improve something or if something’s not working great, then I know it. I love to wear a big Steven Alan shirt — I usually get something a bit oversize. So I’ll wear a men’s extra-large reverse seam in white, with a pair of jeans we’ve made. I also have a lot of old Levi’s because I collect a lot of denim. I love a 501, but I like to buy a big men’s size and then cut the legs so they’re kind of wide and cropped. I go to a lot of vintage stores to hunt for them; when I lived in Paris I went every weekend to look at the flea markets. I’m also a big vintage eyewear collector and have really loved designing the Steven Alan Optical collection.

2015-06-15-1434402929-2419393-9to51.jpg
Rag & Bone Clara denim bucket hat, $ 39; intermixonline.com; Steven Alan Optical Wentworth glasses in light stripe tortoise, $ 195; stevenalanoptical.com; Levi’s 501 CT jeans, $ 80; mrporter.com; Steven Alan x Beauty & Youth Loose Turkey cotton crewneck tee, $ 98; stevenalan.com
Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of Intermixo; Courtesy of stevenalanoptical.com; Courtesy of mrporter.com; Courtesy of stevenalan.com

2015-06-15-1434403038-9522177-aibihr9to502.jpg
Photo: Courtesy of Aï Bihr

On my feet, I usually have sneakers or oxfords. Or like, a penny loafer. My whole team knows I’m addicted to these Japanese high tops called Shoes Like Pottery. I wear them constantly, year round. I don’t want to be boring, but I always look the same! Even if there’s a corporate event or I have to make a presentation, I always look the same. I try to stay very consistent and have been very consistent for a long time. I’ve always worn a lot of jumpsuits–whatever brand I go to, I make jumpsuits for them. They’re kind of great because they’re so versatile. You can even tie the sleeves at the waist and they make really great pants that way. I have a nice collection of vintage jumpsuits, some from the Yves Saint Laurent Safari collection, and I’ll wear those tied at the waist or zip them up and belt them. And if I’m wearing a jumpsuit like that I might add a little heeled sandal. Maryam Nassir Zadeh makes beautiful shoes. If I do go to a party and I feel like wearing something a little bit different I’ll put on sandals from Maryam. One of my best friends, Mona, designs A Détacher and she makes really beautiful skirts and dresses. I recently bought an indigo skirt/culotte thing from her. It’s the perfect length and so good for summer parties.

More: Dressing 9 to 5–What the Most Stylish Women Wear to Work: Caterer Laila Gohar of Sunday Supper

2015-06-15-1434403147-8858626-9to52.jpg

Steven Alan sleeveless crossover shirt, $ 178; stevenalan.com; Acne Studios Avon drawstring safari jacket, $ 354; matchesfashion.com; Maryam Nassir Zadeh Sophie suede sandal, $ 368; nastygal.com; A Détacher Sissy shorts, $ 450; lagarconne.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of stevenalan.com; Courtesy of matchesfashion.com; Courtesy of nastygal.com; Courtesy of nastygal.com

2015-06-15-1434403186-3652046-aibihr9to503.jpg

Dress for the Seasons

When the weather is this hot and humid, I love to wear linen and cotton poplin. We have these really great cotton poplin wide trousers from Steven Alan called the Picnic Pant. When you wear a wide-leg trouser like that, it’s nice to wear something small on top. You can’t wear something too big, or else you look like a tent. It’s also a great pant to wear with a linen T-shirt.

2015-06-15-1434403461-2096312-9to53.jpg

Steven Alan Picnic pant, $ 255; stevenalan.com; Mango cropped linen top, $ 50; for information: mango.com; Manolo Blahnik Vazca penny loafers, $ 745; barneys.com

Photo: (Clockwise from left) Courtesy of Steven Alan; Courtesy of Mango; Courtesy of Barneys

In the fall, I’m usually in a suit. I’ll wear a suit jacket and a pair of trousers, with a T-shirt and sneakers. I have a few different jacket styles that I really like–one is a schoolboy that’s a bit smaller; The Row makes a really nice one every year. And then I like a boyfriend notched lapel in tropical wool; it’s actually the first jacket I made for Steven Alan when I joined the company and it’s still my go-to. I also always love to have a peak lapel double-breasted blazer. I think the key to pulling off a suit is–well, first of all you just really have to find the right suit for you. But then you also have to have a more casual element in your accessories or what you’re wearing the suit with, like a T-shirt and sneakers.

2015-06-15-1434403590-4951679-9to54.jpg

The Row Maguire double-breasted shantung blazer, $ 1,554; net-a-porter.com; Isabel Marant Étoile Kiliann Lima tee, price upon request; otteny.com; Reed Krakoff cotton-blend tapered pants, $ 483; net-a-porter.com; Shoes Like Pottery low-top canvas shoe, $ 155; stevenalan.com

Photo: (Clockwise from top left) Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of otteny.com; Courtesy of net-a-porter.com; Courtesy of Steven Alan

Quality Control

When I’m shopping for myself, I always look at the finishing of the garment. I’m looking on the inside, not just the outside, examining the fabric, rubbing it on my neck and doing all the crazy things that designers do. You want to make sure there’s a clean finish–basically, that you don’t see all this thread wrapped around the seam–so that it doesn’t look like things are going to snag. It’s good to pay attention to these kinds of things, because they’re going to dictate the longevity of the garment. And really touch the fabric. Customers aren’t stupid, they know when they’re feeling good fabric. This is why we choose to use really good fabric at Steven Alan, because our customers are smart. They know they’re not getting garbage from us. That’s one thing I’m really proud of: There’s no room for poor quality. I’m really proud to say that more than 90 percent of the things I make are made in New York. And if it’s not made here, it’s made at the best factory in Japan.

2015-06-15-1434403692-9621252-aibihr9to501.jpg

Photo: Courtesy of Aï Bihr

More from Vogue:

How Brigitte Bardot Was a Stylish Bride 9 Times Over

Reese Witherspoon Updates the All-American Look with Her Line, Draper James

Want Him to Propose? Here’s What to Wear

Kendall Jenner Shows How to Pull Off This Tricky Denim Trend

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

See the cutest — and most creative — celebrity baby announcements

We love it when celebrities share baby photos on social media, but sometimes their pregnancy announcements can be equally adorable.




TODAY Pop Culture

Live webcam sex! More than 20000 Hot Girls are waiting for you!

Big commercial hit and small, creative musical lead Tony Awards

Experts predict Tony co-host and nominee Kristin Chenoweth will have a big night. Rough Cut (no reporter narration)


Reuters Video: Entertainment

Find your Soulmate Live webcam chat!

All Songs: Nine Creative Musicians You Should Know

All of the songs on this week’s show grapple with the alchemy of creation.

» E-Mail This

Rock

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Click and Enjoy!

The Mother’s Day I Became a Gender Creative Kid’s Champion

2015-05-06-1430931029-9986763-HJMeswingset2003.jpeg

When the holiday just for moms rolls around, I can’t help but think of my first one in 1990. Harry was just six weeks old. Their* dad and I tucked them into a red baby carriage and walked through the spectacular tulip gardens at Milwaukee’s Boerner Botanical Gardens. That trip became a tradition.

Harry started making tulip-themed Mother’s Day cards for me in kindergarten. They were in third grade when I received a handmade coupon book written in Spanish, redeemable for three kisses (besos), a hug (abrazo) and a cleaning of the parakeets’ cage (never mind).

2015-05-06-1430936623-5740358-Photo2_CouponbookSIZED.jpg

The Mother’s Day Harry was 12, they handed me a plain business envelope with M❤M written on the front. I unfolded a single sheet of white paper to find a typed poem titled “The Joy of Having a Mother.” I was blown away.

“You wrote me a poem?!”

“Well, you wanted one,” they said.

Harry had begun writing a lot of poetry, and I’d asked at the beginning of the school year if they’d write one for me.

“That’s true,” I replied, “but I didn’t know you’d actually do it. And I certainly didn’t think it would be about me.” I sat down to read, my eyes lingering on each phrase.

“The Joy of Having a Mother
In life we only get one,
One who could never be outdone,
Somebody who is there forever and always throughout eternity,
Somebody not tainted throughout modernity,
They are there to help you, and to guide your direction,
One who will never face you with rejection,
Cherish this someone,
This heroine,
This champion,
Cherish this someone, for who they are,
Whether you are near or far,
Because they will love you, you not another,
And that is the joy of having a mother…

I wiped a wet streak from my face. I’d never felt more important as a mother than in that moment. In a few lines my child had articulated our unbreakable bond and brought clarity to my role as their mom. But it felt a bit strange; I’d never thought of myself as a heroine or champion before. What I seemed to recall most were the times I thought I’d failed them.

I still felt guilty about not letting them be Wendy from Peter Pan for Halloween when they were two. And I wanted a double do-over for not having learned my lesson when they were four years old and I wouldn’t buy the Pink Power Ranger costume, only the blue one. I wish I’d known then what I know now. Harry didn’t care what anyone else thought; it was I who cared. I didn’t want anyone making fun of my child or judging me as a woman who was somehow making her kid gay.

I know we all make mistakes, feel guilty, or wish we’d done a thing or two differently. But here’s what Harry taught me: Unconditional love and support have no expiration date. We can demonstrate what it means to cherish our children at any moment in the present, even if our own mothers didn’t have the resources to do the same for us.

I was struck recently by something dancer Jerel Maddox said on a recent episode of The Prancing Elites Project. There’s a scene we learn that dance-crew member Adrian’s mom has never seen her son perform. She’s been to her other son’s basketball games and her daughter’s recitals, but never been there for Adrian. “There’s absolutely nothing like a mother’s love and a mother’s support,” Jerel says in a private on-camera moment. “If Adrian’s mom doesn’t come to the competition, it will emotionally tear him up.”

I think it’s a mother’s job to encourage her child to find their passion. We’re also in their lives to defend and protect our kids and give them a strong sense of belonging. They need that from us. It’s how they learn the importance of self-love and self-acceptance, the attributes that lead them to become happy, healthy and emotionally secure adults.

2015-05-06-1430935746-6249427-Photo4HJMe2015SIZED.jpg

These days Harry is my hero. They are true to themselves and still don’t care what anyone else thinks. They trust themselves and believe in their worthiness. And while Harry may not make cards or write poems for me on Mother’s Day anymore, they fill my world with indescribable joy. And once in awhile, for no reason at all, they’ll surprise me with a colorful bouquet of tulips.

*Author’s Note: My now-25-year-old child, who identifies as genderqueer, tells me they have no preferred gender pronoun. I like to use “they” to identify them as a person first, with gender coming second. Sometimes I mess up and say “he,” or “she” when they’re performing as Amber Alert. When I apologize they’ll say, “Mom, I really don’t care what you call me.”

This piece first appeared on the Give a Damn Campaign and Julie’s personal blog, My Son Wears Heels. You can also find her on Facebook.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Gay Voices – The Huffington Post

Chemistry.com gay - First Date 300x250

In Her Shoes: A Chat With Jimmy Choo’s Creative Director


Sandra Choi shares how the iconic luxury footwear label has become a red carpet must-have and the time she didn’t recognize Angelina Jolie.

read more



Style

Peter Dundas Named Creative Director of Roberto Cavalli


The Norwegian designer will show his first collection for the Italian brand at September’s Milan Fashion Week.

read more





Style

Emilio Pucci Appoints New Creative Director


Massimo Giorgetti will succeed Peter Dundas, who departed the luxury label after seven years to join Roberto Cavalli.

read more





Style

Martin Scorsese’s Bill Clinton Documentary Shelved Over Creative Control

Martin Scorsese’s upcoming slate is already packed with an authorized Grateful Dead documentary, his rock & roll HBO series co-created with Mick Jagger and the planned Ramones biopic. However, another of the legendary director’s projects, the partly finished HBO-backed documentary on President Bill Clinton, has been indefinitely shelved as the director……
RollingStone.com: News

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Click and Enjoy!

A Ride on the Creative Process

I know from the comments on this blog that many of you are interested in the creative process. Let me take you for ride in my head. I took this journey yesterday. It is still fresh in my mind so I can explain it.

Most new ideas are combinations of existing ideas. I'll start by describing the random thoughts that inspired one of the most powerful ideas I have ever had. We'll get to the idea itself at the end. I think this idea could cut the unemployment rate in half and turbo-charge the entire economy for generations. And the plan could be fully implemented by the people reading this blog.

No government needed. I know you like that part.

The other day I saw a Kickstarter fund for a sincere-looking fellow that wanted to fix his truck and move to a place with better job prospects. I liked his style. I prefer helping people that have a concrete plan. But a Kickstarter fund? It seemed sketchy. I don't know anything about this guy.

That made me think of Uber. They had the same problem of credibility because the drivers are independent contractors. But it didn't stop them.

Then I was thinking about eBay. I wasn't sure why. My subconscious sniffed some eBay connection in all of this. Maybe that would become clear later.

Then I was thinking of unemployment in general, and how the real problem is that people and jobs are in the wrong locations. We don't have a shortage of good jobs; we have a location problem.

Then I was thinking about an idea I had last year for allowing anyone to create online education courses. Each online teacher might specialize in just one small lesson within a larger curriculum that could be pieced together by the user for the ultimate teaching experience. And over time the best lessons would get voted to the top until the best teachers with the best lesson segments emerged in a sped-up evolution way. I didn't know at the time what that thought had to do with the guy and his broken truck.

Then I was thinking about new app ideas. I do that often, sometimes for my side job and sometimes just with friends. Whenever I see a problem I automatically wonder if an app can fix it.

Then it was Veterans Day. I was thinking how shitty it would be to return home from the service and try to find work.

All of those thoughts swirled around in my head for half a day and then went off wherever ideas go when you are not actively thinking about them.

Later that day, the ideas returned. But this time they were not individuals. They had somehow combined into a new idea – a hybrid of several ideas. And the idea presented itself to me in the form of an app, probably because my mind is organized that way at the moment.

If might be the most important idea of my life. If not, I'm sure you will set me straight in the comments.

Suppose we build an app that allows anyone to sponsor specific part of people's plans for moving to where the good jobs are.

Let's take the example of the individual that wanted to fix his truck and move where the jobs are plentiful. If the app existed, he would open it and start piecing together his plan.

He might start by specifying his existing skill set. That would bring up a map of the country with glowing hot spots showing where his skills are most in demand. Once he selects a target location, he specifies in the app what he needs to make it happen.

  1. $ 5,000 for truck repair
  2. A place to stay at the destination end for one month (est.)
  3. Help putting together a good resume.
  4. $ 1,000 for travel and living expenses

The app would then allow anyone to offer help for any part of the plan. But the plan would not become active until all the parts were pledged. And let's say a minimum requirement for the job-seeker is that he has a Facebook page and accepts as friends any serious helpers so they can check out his situation and maybe message his other friends to ask about character.

If the individual needs job training, the cost of training could be in his plan. That sort of plan has a longer horizon but it is still appealing because training works.

Each of us has different resources to offer this imagined job-seeker. I might have a spare room he could use for a month in return for mowing my lawn. You might be good at editing and improving resumes. Maybe someone in his town can fix his truck for the price of parts. Maybe someone has the truck parts he needs. For people that don't have any form of transportation, maybe someone is driving in the direction you are headed and wants to share gas expenses. Maybe I can't afford to fund all of the expenses for this particular job-seeker but I am happy to kick in $ 10 if other people do.

And let's say multiple people can bid on any part of a plan in which they want to help. I might offer a couch to sleep on for a month but you outbid me with a full guest room for two months. The plan can continue improving as it fills in its holes.

Once the journey begins, the app updates contributors on the physical location of the job-seeker and how the plan is going. The job-seeker could post photos of the journey to keep sponsors in the loop. If the plan falls apart at any point, such as not having a promised place to stay at the destination end, an alert goes out to everyone in the target area that a priority job-seeker is nearby, so someone can jump in to help.

Are you not yet convinced that this is a great idea? That's okay because I saved the best part for last.

The risk in this plan is not so much in the execution of the app, because we know how to make software of this type. The risk is in awareness of the app and in getting enough people excited about being sponsors. If we don't solve the awareness problem, the quality of the app is irrelevant.

So let's solve that.

Let's make the app for veterans only, at least to start. Later, if it works as hoped, it would be available for the general public.

A veterans-only job-finding app would be instantly popular. If I tell you that a random guy needs money for his truck, you shrug. If I tell you that a returning vet needs help with a concrete plan to get a good job, your wallet flies out of your pocket before your hand even touches it.

So we launch the service for vets first, and get all the goodwill and energy that the effort deserves. Later, when you release the app for the general public, you keep vets on some sort of priority plan within the app so they continue getting preferential attention.

I think you would need to build this app as a commercial enterprise just to attract the talent you need. And it should have a big name attached to it to scare away any smaller players that would muddy the waters. (My name isn't big enough for that space.)

I'm willing to put up $ 25K seed money for this app. But I would need to see a serious team in place to execute.

One of my systems for happiness involves always working on at least one project that can change the world for the better. This is my contribution for today.

Would it work?

————————————–

Scott Adams
Co-founder of CalendarTree.com     
Author of this book 

Twitter Dilbert: @Dilbert_Daily

Twitter for Scott: @ScottAdamsSays


Dilbert.com Blog

THHP #65 Creative differences

In this episode of THHP Task Phraze Chaos and grubby talk Busta leaving cash money,new NWA money, excuses rappers make and much more good stuff…

Subscribe via iTunes
Join the THHP group on Facebook here
The Hip-Hop Podcast

Designers Dish: Tod’s Creative Director Alessandra Facchinetti


During a recent stop in L.A., the Milan-based mega designer (and Tom Ford’s former right hand) dished on her minimalist collection, what makes a proper Hollywood muse and the art of “managing the creative process like a schedule.”

read more





Style

Easy and Creative Ways to Decorate a Cake #OWNSHOW

RE-TWEET THIS: http://bit.ly/DecorativeCakes
From icing tips to whimsical cake topper ideas, author Libbie Summers shares advice on how to make any cake stand out.
#OWNSHOW is a digital exclusive web-show on Oprah.com. Packaged into stackable moments, the show brings together stories, life-tips, and personalities from Oprah.com, OWN, and O Magazine with interactive elements from YOU, the community.

Subscribe to OWN: http://bit.ly/18Lz0rV

Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN

Visit our channel for more videos:https://www.youtube.com/user/OWN

https://www.facebook.com/ownTV

http://instagram.com/oprah


Uploads by OWN TV

How to be a 'Creative' in 15 Minutes

I once read an advertising executive refer to her full-service agency as having a separate division of “creatives” on staff.

Whom were these “creatives,” I wondered, that the executive had referred to so pretentiously? And what about all the slighted “non-creatives” on staff? Hath not an accountant an imagination?

I envisioned the so-called “creatives” as a team of pale monkish types with wasted bodies locked in a dimly lit room, their bald heads conjoined by electrodes while resting in a warm pool — not unlike the “precogs” in the sci-fi film Minority Report.

This was the first time I had heard reference to a special creative class of workers and concluded that I, too, must be a creative.

While working in the early 1990s in public relations for a Fortune 500 company (rhymes with “Be-Me”), the most creative thing I remember doing was conspiring ways to look busy in order to justify my billable hours, which were measured in 15-minute increments on my timesheet. Now that took some creativity!

At lunch, for kicks my fellow creatives and I would wear white lab coats over our suits and roam the airplane-hanger-size plant, occasionally stopping by a random engineer’s work station. We’d shake our heads disapprovingly, scribble imaginary notes on a clipboard, and then walk away.

Perhaps my most creative accomplishment during my year-and-a-half stint there was to leave a Reader’s Digest article entitled “I am Joe’s Aneurism” that I found in my mother-in-law’s bathroom on the desk of one of the project managers.

Weeks later, the project manager stopped by my desk elated.

“Kipp, I’d kiss you if you were a girl!” he said. Apparently, the article would serve as the impetus for a new half-million dollar national television ad campaign.

I’ve been thinking a lot about creativity and where it comes from since the publication of my childhood memoir, Barracuda in the Attic (Fantagraphics 2013), qualifying me as a full member of the creative class.

After all, everyone in my family is a creative artist who has had at least one book published. Now it was my turn to fulfill my family birthright — or, at least, to carve out some space for myself on my bookshelf alongside my family members’ many books.

In my father’s literary memoir, Lucky Bruce (Biblioasis 2011), he speculated that he would have probably become a doctor or lawyer — instead of a writer — had his mother not dropped him from the changing table, forever altering his future. My mother once sheepishly admitted to having dropped my oldest brother Josh from the changing table and Josh went on to become a gifted musician and writer. I’m not aware of my middle brother Drew having been dropped, but he would eventually become a renowned cartoonist and illustrator. Even my mother, a retired acting and auditioning coach, has had several books published. Later in life, she claimed her mother used to whack her on the head, but my mother’s always been a bit of a drama queen.

As for me, I remember Josh playfully hurling me from a band shell when I was about three. I landed with a thud face-first in a mound of sand, chipping my front tooth. Could this be the reason why I went on to pursue a career in the creative class: first as a newspaper reporter, then public relations, then professional photography, and now writing? Years later, I dropped my son, Max, during a midnight feeding and viola! He became the first architect in our family line.

I’m not suggesting that dropping children from changing tables or flinging them from band shells is a means to foster creativity in a child. I’ll leave that theory to behavioral scientists-perhaps a future TEDTalk?

But one thing I’m certain of is that my parents raised us in an environment where creative self-expression was not only allowed, but encouraged.

As the youngest son of a celebrated writer whose career has spanned over half a century, I’ve heard stories all my life. My father has always had a habit of altering things, embellishing them, making them seem bigger and more special that perhaps they were. It’s as if he had been hardwired to ask: what if? Everything could be a launching point for another story, and that was something my brothers and I picked up on and were encouraged to do.

My son, Max, once came to me for writing advice while struggling with an English paper in grade school. I told him that when he is writing, he’s God — not in a religious sense, but as the source, the creator. This advice seemed to free him up to express himself and I now consider him a wonderful writer. Years later, I was proud to hear him still refer to this bit of writing advice I had given him as a child.

Now what can possibly be more creative than God?

Unless, of course, you’re a creative at an ad agency that bills at 15-minute increments.
Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Creative, fun and and outgoing

About Me

Hi everyone,
My name is Leanne and I'm a very mature 20 year old whom knows exactly what she wants.
I'm a make-up artist, model, burlesque performer and dancer.
I spend the majority of my time in London.

I adore meeting new people, pubbing, clubbing, travel, guitar, music, shopping, BDSMFetish scene, fashion, make-up, photography, and more.

Read more about me

What I’m Looking For

Honest, caring, loyal, committed, FUN, outgoing, lives life

makes time for me, infact i have a list of what i expect from my next relationship 😛

See more of what I am looking for

Swinger Date Link

Destiny Dixon & Samantha Saint in Creative Competitor

Destiny Dixon & Samantha Saint in Creative Competitor Destiny Dixon & Samantha Saint in Creative Competitor
Click to See More Penthouse Pics of Destiny Dixon & Samantha Saint in Creative Competitor

Latest Galleries at Penthouse.com