The Hilarious Side of Funny: True Anecdotes to Laugh Your Ass Off (Unabridged) – Dean Aulichme

Dean Aulichme - The Hilarious Side of Funny: True Anecdotes to Laugh Your Ass Off (Unabridged)  artwork

The Hilarious Side of Funny: True Anecdotes to Laugh Your Ass Off (Unabridged)

Dean Aulichme

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 2.95

Publish Date: July 10, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 Dean Aulichme

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Kill Game: A Cold Poker Gang Mystery – Dean Wesley Smith

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Kill Game: A Cold Poker Gang Mystery

Dean Wesley Smith

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: April 18, 2018

Publisher: WMG Publishing

Seller: Draft2Digital, LLC


USA Today bestselling author Dean Wesley Smith takes you into the world of his acclaimed novel Dead Money with a new series about a group of retired Las Vegas Police detectives playing poker and solving cold cases. Retired Detective Bayard Lott hosts the weekly poker games at his home. The group calls themselves the Cold Poker Gang. And they succeed at closing old cases. Lott's very first homicide case as a brand-new detective had gone cold more than twenty years earlier. But retired Reno detective Julia Rogers, new to the Cold Poker Gang, suggests they look at that case again for personal reasons. From that simple suggestion spins one of the strangest and most complicated murder mystery puzzles the gang has ever seen. Read the whole riveting series! Cold Call Calling Dead  Bad Beat Dead Hand  Freezeout Ace High Burn Card "Dean Wesley Smith does for poker what James Patterson does for serial killers." —Sheldon McArthur, former owner of Mysterious Books in Los Angeles "[An] exhilarating political poker thriller." —Genre Go Round Reviews on Dead Money

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Stone Temple Pilots’ Dean DeLeo’s Divorce Case Gets Nastier

Dean DeLeo — guitarist for the rock band Stone Temple Pilots — is clapping back at his estranged wife who has accused him of being a violent alcoholic … saying she’s trying to smear him the way she did her ex. Dean filed new legal docs in his divorce…

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Sigur Rós: Heima – Dean Deblois

Dean Deblois - Sigur Rós: Heima  artwork

Sigur Rós: Heima

Dean Deblois

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: February 18, 2014


In the endless magic hour of the Icelandic summer, Sigur Rós played a series of concerts around their homeland. Combining both the biggest and smallest shows of their career, the entire tour was filmed, and provides a unique insight into one of the world’s shyest and least understood bands captured live in their natural habitat.The culmination of more than a year spent promoting their hugely successful “Takk…” album around the world, the Icelandic tour was free to all-comers and went largely unannounced. Playing in deserted fish factories, outsider art follies, far-flung community halls, sylvan fields, darkened caves and the hoof print of Odin’s horse, Sleipnir, the band reached an entirely new spectrum of the Icelandic population; young and old, ardent and merely quizzical, entirely by word-of-mouth.The question of the way Sigur Rós’s music relates to, and is influenced by, their environment has been reduced to a journalistic cliché about glacial majesty and fire and ice, but there is no doubt that the band are inextricably linked to the land in which they were forged. And the decision to film this first-ever Sigur Rós film in Iceland was, in the end, ineluctable.Shot using a largely Icelandic crew (to minimize Eurovision-style scenic-wonder overload), Heima – which means both “at home” and “homeland” – is an attempt to make a film every bit as big, beautiful and unfettered as a Sigur Rós album. As such it was always going to be something of a grand folio, but one, which taking in no fewer than 15 locations around Iceland (including the country’s largest ever concert at the band’s Reykjavik homecoming), is never less than epic in its ambition.Material from all four of the band’s albums is featured, including many rare and notable moments. Among these are a heart-stopping rendition of the previously unreleased “Gitardjamm”, filmed inside a derelict herring oil tank in the far West Fjords; a windblown, one-mic recording of “Vaka”, shot at a dam protest camp subsequently drowned by rising water; and first time acoustic versions of such rare live beauties as “Staralfur”, “Agaetis Byrjun”, and “Von”.

© © 2007 Klikk Film. All Rights Reserved.

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Bad Samaritan – Dean Devlin

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Bad Samaritan

Dean Devlin

Genre: Thriller

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: May 4, 2018


A valet car park develops a scam to burglarize the houses of restaurant customers. Things go smoothly until he robs the wrong man and discovers a woman being held captive. Afraid of going to jail, he calls the police who find nothing when they investigate. Now the valet must endure the wrath of the kidnapper who seeks revenge on him while desperately trying to find and rescue the captive woman he left behind.

© © 2017 Bad Samaritan Holdings, Inc.

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Stone Temple Pilots Guitarist Dean DeLeo’s Wife Files for Divorce, Alleges Abuse

Dean DeLeo — guitarist for the rock band, Stone Temple Pilots — is heading for divorce … and his wife claims he’s an abusive, drunken mess who makes her fear for the lives of her and their daughter. According to the legal docs … Jenn DeLeo filed…

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How to Train Your Dragon – Dean Deblois & Christopher Michael Sanders

Dean Deblois & Christopher Michael Sanders - How to Train Your Dragon  artwork

How to Train Your Dragon

Dean Deblois & Christopher Michael Sanders

Genre: Kids & Family

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: March 26, 2010


This Academy Award®-nominated DreamWorks Animation film rolls fire-breathing action, epic adventure and big laughs into a captivating, fun and original story. Hiccup is a young Viking who defies tradition and befriends one of his deadliest foes – a ferocious dragon he calls Toothless. Together, the unlikely heroes fight against the odds to save both their worlds in this wonderful, feel-good hit.

© © 2010 DreamWorks Animation L.L.C. All Rights Reserved.

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How to Train Your Dragon 2 – Dean Deblois

Dean Deblois - How to Train Your Dragon 2  artwork

How to Train Your Dragon 2

Dean Deblois

Genre: Kids & Family

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: June 13, 2014


From the Academy Award® nominated film DreamWorks How to Train Your Dragon comes the next chapter in the epic trilogy. When Hiccup and Toothless discover a secret ice cave with wild dragons and a mysterious Dragon Rider, the two friends find themselves in an epic battle to save the future of men and dragons! Also includes all new adventure How to Train Your Dragon: Dawn of the Dragon Racers in your iTunes Extras!

© © 2014 DreamWorks Animation, L.L.C. All rights reserved.

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Kill Game – Dean Wesley Smith

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Kill Game

Dean Wesley Smith

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: April 18, 2018

Publisher: WMG Publishing

Seller: Draft2Digital, LLC


USA Today bestselling author Dean Wesley Smith takes you into the world of his acclaimed novel Dead Money with a new series about a group of retired Las Vegas Police detectives playing poker and solving cold cases. Retired Detective Bayard Lott hosts the weekly poker games at his home. The group calls themselves the Cold Poker Gang. And they succeed at closing old cases. Lott’s very first homicide case as a brand-new detective had gone cold more than twenty years earlier. But retired Reno detective Julia Rogers, new to the Cold Poker Gang, suggests they look at that case again for personal reasons. From that simple suggestion spins one of the strangest and most complicated murder mystery puzzles the gang has ever seen. “Dean Wesley Smith does for poker what James Patterson does for serial killers.” –Sheldon McArthur, former owner of Mysterious Books in Los Angeles

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Dean Unglert Reveals He’s Starting Therapy After Lesley Murphy Split

LESLEY MURPHY, DEAN UNGLERTDean Unglert’s got a lot to think about following his recent split from The Bachelor Winter Games’ Lesley Murphy, who left the show as a couple, only to break up last week after four…


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Jeffrey Dean Morgan Opens Up About Delivering Both Of His Children

Jeffrey Dean Morgan is one hands-on dad!


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Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged) – Greg Dean

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Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged)

Greg Dean

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.95

Publish Date: October 10, 2010

© ℗ © 2010 Big Happy Family, LLC

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Sector 64: First Contact: A Prequel Novella – Dean M. Cole

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Sector 64: First Contact: A Prequel Novella

Dean M. Cole

Genre: Science Fiction

Publish Date: September 27, 2017

Publisher: CANDTOR Press

Seller: Draft2Digital, LLC


From the Bestselling Author of  Solitude ! As part of the Greatest Generation, Major Anthony Spinelli, a World War II fighter pilot, flew into combat to save his family and keep them free. Two years later, he lost them in the blink of an eye, leaving Tony rudderless and without purpose. Then, on a dark, moonless night, in the skies above 1947 New Mexico, he has an encounter that will change humanity forever. However, when an accident threatens to unleash unimaginable destruction, Tony must race against time and unwinding plots to save us … and maybe himself along the way. Grab your copy and start reading today! What the Critics are Saying KirkusReviews.com : "Cole tackles the first-contact scenario with bombastic flair. His vibrant prose delivers the high-resolution imagery of a Hollywood blockbuster. A technologically riveting dream for sci-fi action fans." AudiobookReviewer.com : "SECTOR 64 was a highly imaginative action-packed apocalyptic assault on your mind." IndieReader.com : "SECTOR 64 is an engaging book from the very first page to the final words of the Epilogue." Audiobook-Heaven.com : "Cole has a good thing going … His descriptions of aerial battle and his knowledge of the aircraft themselves fascinated me … Sector 64 is a great read." Scroll up and grab your copy today!

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Geostorm – Dean Devlin

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Geostorm

Dean Devlin

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 19.99

Release Date: October 20, 2017


What if, in the wake of more than a decade of devastating weather events, we finally found a way to control Mother Nature and the destruction her tirades entail? When catastrophic climate change endangers Earth’s very survival, world governments unite and create Project Dutch Boy: a global net of satellites surrounding the planet that are armed with geo-engineering technologies designed to stave off the natural disasters. After successfully protecting the planet for two years, something is starting to go wrong. Two estranged brothers (Gerard Butler, Jim Sturgess) are tasked with solving the program’s malfunction before a worldwide geostorm can engulf the planet.

© © 2017 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., Skydance Productions, LLC and RatPac-Dune Entertainment LLC.

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Thank You for Your Service (2017) – Jason Dean Hall

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Thank You for Your Service (2017)

Jason Dean Hall

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 14.99

Release Date: October 27, 2017


For Sergeant Adam Schumann (Miles Teller)—and many soldiers like him—the process of leaving combat back in Iraq was as seemingly simple as getting on that plane. But standing on the tarmac again in the arms of loved ones would turn out to be merely a first step in the long and exacting journey of actually returning home. Thank You for Your Service follows a group of U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq who struggle to integrate back into family and civilian life while living with the memory of a war that threatens to destroy them long after they’ve left the battlefield.

© © 2017 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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Alien: The Official Movie Novelization (Unabridged) – Alan Dean Foster

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Alien: The Official Movie Novelization (Unabridged)

Alan Dean Foster

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: December 10, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Audible Studios

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Star Wars: The Force Awakens (Unabridged) – Alan Dean Foster

Alan Dean Foster - Star Wars: The Force Awakens (Unabridged)  artwork

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (Unabridged)

Alan Dean Foster

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: December 18, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Random House Audio

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13 Short Stories (feat. Josh Johnson, Dean Hulett & Jonathan Pinson) – Joshua White

Joshua White - 13 Short Stories (feat. Josh Johnson, Dean Hulett & Jonathan Pinson)  artwork

13 Short Stories (feat. Josh Johnson, Dean Hulett & Jonathan Pinson)

Joshua White

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: October 1, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Fresh Sound Records

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SECTOR 64: Ambush – Dean M. Cole

Dean M. Cole - SECTOR 64: Ambush  artwork

SECTOR 64: Ambush

Dean M. Cole

Genre: Science Fiction

Publish Date: August 31, 2017

Publisher: CANDTOR Press

Seller: Draft2Digital, LLC


**Bestselling Author of  Solitude: Dimension Space Book One ** Sandra just discovered she's pregnant, but with humanity on the brink of extinction, this Air Force Captain might be the world's only hope. If you like action-packed, page-turning novels, then you'll love the electrifying action in this apocalyptic thriller. Grab Book One Today! Independence Day  meets  The X-Files  when Air Force fighter pilots Jake Giard and Sandra Fitzpatrick join a decades-old secret project to integrate today's Earth into a galactic government. But when a galactic civil war spills onto our shores, plunging the planet into an otherworldly post-apocalyptic hell, can Jake and Sandy save humanity from extinction? A Little More About Ambush… As unknown aliens with a dark secret continue to raid the planet, Jake fights through a post-apocalyptic hell, struggling to comprehend the enigmatic aftermath of the first attack. On the West Coast, Sandra's squadron smashes against the invading aliens. Thrown to ground, Sandy wades through blazing infernos and demented looters in a desperate attempt to save her family. Finally, with the fate of the world in the balance, both captains must take the battle to the enemy—humanity's very survival hanging on their success. What the Critics are Saying KirkusReviews.com : "Cole tackles the first-contact scenario with bombastic flair. [He] delivers the high-resolution imagery of a Hollywood blockbuster … A technologically riveting dream for sci-fi action fans." AudiobookReviewer.com : "SECTOR 64: Ambush was a highly imaginative action-packed apocalyptic assault on your mind." IndieReader.com : "SECTOR 64: AMBUSH is an engaging book from the very first page to the final words of the Epilogue." Audiobook-Heaven.com : "His descriptions of aerial battle and military procedure are accurately detailed and his knowledge of the aircraft themselves fascinated me … Sector 64: Ambush is a great read." Scroll up and grab a copy today.

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Oops! Jeffrey Dean Morgan Just Let It Slip That Hilarie Burton Is Pregnant With a Girl

Hilarie Burton, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, 2017 Emmys, CandidsSomeone just let the cat out of the bag and that someone is definitely Jeffrey Dean Morgan.
The Walking Dead actor, who is notoriously private, had quite the slip-up of secret information…


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Dean Unglert Confirms He Reunited With Kristina Schulman to ”Work Through” Things

Bachelor in Paradise, Dean Unglert, Kristina SchulmanLooks like things might not be totally over between Bachelor in Paradise’s Dean Ungert and Kristina Schulman.
Last week, many savvy social media stalkers noticed Dean had traveled to…


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Dean Unglert Reunites With Kristina Schulman Following Bachelor in Paradise Love Triangle

Kristina Schulman, Dean Unglert Not all love is lost in the Bachelor in Paradise franchise.
Just when you thought Dean Unglert’s relationships with both Kristina Schulman and Danielle Lombard were done, complete and…


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Veteran actor Harry Dean Stanton dies at 91

Harry Dean Stanton, star of “Repo Man,” dies at age 91. Bob Mezan reports.


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Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

Harry Dean Stanton died Friday of natural causes at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Take a look back at his most memorable roles from “Big Love” to “Pretty In Pink” to “Twin Peaks.”


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Dean – Demetri Martin

Demetri Martin - Dean  artwork

Dean

Demetri Martin

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: June 2, 2017


Writer-director Demetri Martin stars alongside Academy Award winner Kevin Kline in this comedic and heartfelt film about a father and son coming to terms with love, loss, and everything in between. Following a life-shaking event, Dean (Martin), a New York illustrator, hops a transcontinental flight hoping to figure out his increasingly crazy world. While in Los Angeles, Dean unexpectedly discovers romance, hope, inspiration, and the importance of family.

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Aliens: The Official Movie Novelization (Unabridged) – Alan Dean Foster

Alan Dean Foster - Aliens: The Official Movie Novelization (Unabridged)  artwork

Aliens: The Official Movie Novelization (Unabridged)

Alan Dean Foster

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: December 10, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Audible Studios

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‘The Bachelorette’: Dean Calls Being Sent Home ‘Rough’ But ‘Cathartic’

Rachel narrowed down her pool of suitors to three on Monday night’s “The Bachelorette.” Dean was the one who was sent home and on Tuesday, he opened up about saying goodbye to Rachel during a visit to Access Hollywood Live.


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Bachelor Nation Reacts to Dean Unglert’s Unforgettable Hometown Date With Rachel Lindsay on The Bachelorette

The BacheloretteYou just never know what to expect when it’s time for hometown date week.
With just four contestants left this season on The Bachelorette, Rachel Lindsay was given the opportunity to…


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Catfish Promises: Did April Give Dean A Fair Chance?

April’s ‘Catfish’ turned out to be exactly who he said he was — but their ending still wasn’t exactly a happy one.
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Saban’s Power Rangers – Dean Israelite

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Saban’s Power Rangers

Dean Israelite

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: March 24, 2017


SABAN’S POWER RANGERS follows five ordinary teens who must become something extraordinary when they learn that their small town of Angel Grove — and the world — is on the verge of being obliterated by an alien threat. Chosen by destiny, our heroes quickly discover they are the only ones who can save the planet. But to do so, they will have to overcome their real-life issues and before it’s too late, band together as the Power Rangers.

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Mike Dean Drops Kanye West’s “When I See It (Extended Version)” | Wired Tracks 10.28.15

Today’s Wired Tracks has a G.O.O.D. ring to it. Kanye West’s go-to engineer Mike Dean debuted an extended version of “When I See It,” which is Ye’s take on The Weeknd’s “Tell Your Friends.”

Dean saves listeners the time of hearing West’s autotune crooning, instead letting the rhythms of a hard-hitting bridge bombard your ears. Press play to hear “When I See It,” where you’ll also find cuts from Fame School, Katie Got Bandz, and more.

Photo: Instagram

Fame School ft. Manolo Rose, Dave East & Memphis Bleek – “Tom Ford & Crack Smoke”

Katie Got Bandz – “P-E-T-T-Y”

Sheek Louch ft. Jadakiss – “Sucka Free”

Lyrica Anderson ft. YG & The Game – “Buzzin”

Cousin Stizz – “No Bells (Thelonius Martin Remix)”

Tim Vocals – “I’m Different”

RAST – “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”

Jayaire Woods – trees42morrow

The post Mike Dean Drops Kanye West’s “When I See It (Extended Version)” | Wired Tracks 10.28.15 appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

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Jeffrey Dean Morgan Describes Role In ‘The Good Wife’ Season 7

Jeffrey Dean Morgan tells Access about joining ‘The Good Wife’ cast for Season 7. What is his character’s relationship with Alicia Florrick?


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Dino: The Essential Dean Martin – Dean Martin

Dean Martin - Dino: The Essential Dean Martin  artwork

Dino: The Essential Dean Martin

Dean Martin

Genre: Pop

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: May 31, 2004

© ℗ 2013 Capitol Records LLC

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Dean Risko Says He Wants To Be A “White Male Version” Of Lauryn Hill

Dean Risko also says Eminem, Wu-Tang Clan and Asher Roth, among others were big influences early on.


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Red 2 – Dean Parisot

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Red 2

Dean Parisot

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 13.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: July 19, 2013


Retired CIA agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) reunites his unlikely team of elite operatives to track down a missing nuclear device. This time, they must survive an army of ruthless assassins, terrorists, and power-crazed government officials all eager to own the portable nuke. Relying on their wits, cunning, and old-school skills, Moses and his team fight to save the planet once again in this high-octane sequel to the action hit RED.

© © 2013 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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Rest For The Wicked – The Claire Wiche Chronicles Book 1 – Cate Dean

Cate Dean - Rest For The Wicked - The Claire Wiche Chronicles Book 1  artwork

Rest For The Wicked – The Claire Wiche Chronicles Book 1

Cate Dean

Genre: Paranormal

Publish Date: April 16, 2012

Publisher: Cate Dean

Seller: Smashwords


She's running from her past. And running out of time.Claire Wiche is an ordinary woman, running her Wicca shop, The Wiche's Broom, in an ordinary California beach town. But Claire wasn’t always ordinary, and she isn’t quite human. She hides a secret, and a past she thought she had put behind her.A past that is about to explode into her present.When it does, and everyone she loves is in danger, Claire must face up to her past – and become what she left behind in order to save them.NOTE: This is a short novel, at just over 40,000 words (125 pages), and has some graphic scenes not suitable for the under 17 readers. As one reviewer stated: "This ain't no Harry Potter."

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Galaxy Quest – Dean Parisot

Dean Parisot - Galaxy Quest  artwork

Galaxy Quest

Dean Parisot

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: December 25, 1999


A team of intrepid adventurers travels through the outer reaches of the galaxy, each week finding excitement and adventure on Galaxy Quest! Or at least that's the way it was in the mid-1970s, when brave if reckless Captain Peter Quincy Taggart, lovely Lieutenant Tawny Madison, and inscrutable alien Dr. Lazarus were the leaders of an interstellar law enforcement team on the TV series of that name. Twenty years later, the show is still in reruns, and Jason Nesmith (Tim Allen), Gwen DeMarco (Sigourney Weaver), and Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman) prop up their sagging careers by making appearances at sci-fi conventions, where they grudgingly shake hands and give autographs for the show's socially inept following. However, it turns out that nerdy sci-fi fans aren't the only ones watching: somewhere in another solar system, a group of alien rebels living under a regime of violence and repression have picked up broadcasts of Galaxy Quest, and they aren't aware that it's fiction. They travel to Earth and encounter the Galaxy Quest cast, who figure that they're just another bunch of guys who like to dress funny. However, they soon realize that they're being hired not for another autograph-signing session but for a real-life outer space rescue mission.

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Frozen Prospects: A YA Epic Fantasy Novel (Volume 1 of The Guadel Chronicles Books) – Dean Murray

Dean Murray - Frozen Prospects: A YA Epic Fantasy Novel (Volume 1 of The Guadel Chronicles Books)  artwork

Frozen Prospects: A YA Epic Fantasy Novel (Volume 1 of The Guadel Chronicles Books)

The Guadel Chronicles, no. 1

Dean Murray

Genre: Epic

Publish Date: March 26, 2011

Publisher: Firshan Publishing

Seller: Smashwords


The invitation to join the secretive Guadel should have been the fulfillment of dreams Va'del didn't even realize he had. When his sponsors are killed in an ambush a short time later, he instead finds his probationary status revoked, and becomes a pawn between various factions inside the Guadel ruling body. Jain's never known any life but that of a Guadel in training. She'd thought herself reconciled to the idea of a loveless marriage for the good of her people, but meeting Va'del changes everything. Their growing attraction flies against hundreds of years of precedent, but as wide-spread attacks threaten their world, the Guadel have no choice but to use even Jain and Va'del in their fight for survival. Publisher's Note: Frozen Prospects is a YA Epic Fantasy book, and is the first novel in the Guadel Chronicles Series which is written so that it can be safely enjoyed by teens and adults alike. Frozen Prospects is followed by Thawed Fortunes. The Guadel Chronicles: All the scope of an epic fantasy combined with the action of a sword and sorcery book!

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Bound (Dark Reflections) – Dean Murray

Dean Murray - Bound (Dark Reflections)  artwork

Bound (Dark Reflections)

Dark Reflections Volume 1

Dean Murray

Genre: Paranormal

Publish Date: January 23, 2014

Publisher: Fir’shan Publishing

Seller: Dean Murray


The only thing worse than having no family at all, is having a family that is out to hurt you. That would all be bad enough for a normal 17-year-old, but it's even worse for Alec Graves. A shape shifter's pack, his family, is the only thing stopping the other preternatural creatures out there from killing them. Alec's pack isn't just neglectful, he's pretty sure that his father wants him dead. Alec is about to be sent to the front lines of a war between his people and everything else that goes bump in the night. His only chance of survival is to convince everyone around him that he's the perfect soldier, but there are lines that Alec won't cross, not for any price. Publisher's Note: Dean Murray's ongoing Reflection Series has been a stunning success with hundreds of thousands of copies in circulation, and a rich, complex world where choices—right or wrong—have real, profound consequences. Unsatisfied with the restrictions imposed on him by writing inside of the conventional series structure, Dean has returned to Sanctuary and the characters so many fans have fallen in love with. Bound is the first in Dean's new Dark Reflections novels, an alternate timeline set in the same world and featuring many of the same characters, but with a profoundly different backstory. Dean finally answers many of the questions that his most dedicated readers have been asking themselves for years. What would have happened if Alec's father hadn't been murdered by the Coun'hij, how would Adri's life have changed if her family hadn't been shattered in a horrific accident? The answers may surprise you, but one thing is for sure; you'll see new sides of familiar faces and when all is said and done, you'll never be able to look at some of them the same. Readers new to Dean Murray's writing can start with Bound in the Dark Reflections Series or Broken in the Reflections Series.

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The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm – Dean F. Wilson

Dean F. Wilson - The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm  artwork

The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm

Dean F. Wilson

Genre: Epic

Publish Date: August 14, 2014

Publisher: Dean F. Wilson

Seller: Smashwords


THE LAST LINE. THE LAST WORDS. THE LAST CHANCE. Ifferon is one of the last in the bloodline of the dead god Telm, who mated with mortal women, and who imprisoned the Beast Agon in the Underworld. Armed with a connection to the estranged gods in the Overworld and a scroll bearing Telm's powerful dying words, he is tasked with ensuring the god's vital legacy: that Agon remain vanquished. Fear forces Ifferon to abandon his duty, but terror restores his quest when the forces of Agon find his hideaway in an isolated coastal monastery. Weighed down by the worries of the world, but lifted up by the companions he encounters along the way, Ifferon embarks on a journey that encompasses the struggles of many peoples, the siege of many lands, and discoveries that could bring hope to some—or doom to all.

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Broken: A YA Paranormal Romance Novel (Volume 1 of the Reflections Books) – Dean Murray

Dean Murray - Broken: A YA Paranormal Romance Novel (Volume 1 of the Reflections Books)  artwork

Broken: A YA Paranormal Romance Novel (Volume 1 of the Reflections Books)

Reflections, no. 1

Dean Murray

Genre: Paranormal

Publish Date: October 28, 2011

Publisher: Firshan Publishing

Seller: Smashwords


Sometimes love finds you when you aren't looking for it. The accident that forced Adri and her mother to move to a new high school also cost Adri her dad and sister. Adri just wants to blend in and buy herself time to grieve, but two of the most popular, gorgeous guys in school are about to take an inexplicable interest in her. Adri will be forced into a world where the players aren't all human. She will be forced to choose between Brandon and Alec, and this time the wrong choice could get her killed. Publisher's Note: Broken is a YA Paranormal Romance book, and is one possible entry point into the books that make up the Reflections Universe. The Reflections Universe is a series of clean books featuring vampires, shape shifters, werewolves and more, which has been written so that it can be safely enjoyed by both teens and adults. Broken is followed by Torn, and is one of several YA books available from Dean. The Reflections Universe: Some stories are too full of teen shifter romance and heart pounding action to fit into just one series! Dean Murray is the successful author of three clean young adult paranormal romance, urban fantasy, and epic fantasy series which collectively have more than 470,000 copies in circulation.

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The Justice League – Richard Dean

Richard Dean - The Justice League  artwork

The Justice League

Richard Dean

Genre: Performing Arts

Publish Date: April 4, 2014

Publisher: Richard Dean

Seller: Smashwords


The Dark Knight assembles the mightiest heroes of the DC universe to fend off the greatest threat the Earth has ever faced.

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Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged) – Greg Dean

Greg Dean - Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged)  artwork

Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged)

Greg Dean

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.95

Publish Date: October 10, 2010

© ℗ © 2010 Big Happy Family, LLC

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Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged) – Greg Dean

Greg Dean - Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged)  artwork

Step by Step to Stand-Up Comedy (Unabridged)

Greg Dean

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.95

Publish Date: October 10, 2010

© ℗ © 2010 Big Happy Family, LLC

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Sigur Rós: Heima – Dean Deblois

Dean Deblois - Sigur Rós: Heima  artwork

Sigur Rós: Heima

Dean Deblois

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: February 18, 2014


In the endless magic hour of the Icelandic summer, Sigur Rós played a series of concerts around their homeland. Combining both the biggest and smallest shows of their career, the entire tour was filmed, and provides a unique insight into one of the world’s shyest and least understood bands captured live in their natural habitat.The culmination of more than a year spent promoting their hugely successful “Takk…” album around the world, the Icelandic tour was free to all-comers and went largely unannounced. Playing in deserted fish factories, outsider art follies, far-flung community halls, sylvan fields, darkened caves and the hoof print of Odin’s horse, Sleipnir, the band reached an entirely new spectrum of the Icelandic population; young and old, ardent and merely quizzical, entirely by word-of-mouth.The question of the way Sigur Rós’s music relates to, and is influenced by, their environment has been reduced to a journalistic cliché about glacial majesty and fire and ice, but there is no doubt that the band are inextricably linked to the land in which they were forged. And the decision to film this first-ever Sigur Rós film in Iceland was, in the end, ineluctable.Shot using a largely Icelandic crew (to minimize Eurovision-style scenic-wonder overload), Heima – which means both “at home” and “homeland” – is an attempt to make a film every bit as big, beautiful and unfettered as a Sigur Rós album. As such it was always going to be something of a grand folio, but one, which taking in no fewer than 15 locations around Iceland (including the country’s largest ever concert at the band’s Reykjavik homecoming), is never less than epic in its ambition.Material from all four of the band’s albums is featured, including many rare and notable moments. Among these are a heart-stopping rendition of the previously unreleased “Gitardjamm”, filmed inside a derelict herring oil tank in the far West Fjords; a windblown, one-mic recording of “Vaka”, shot at a dam protest camp subsequently drowned by rising water; and first time acoustic versions of such rare live beauties as “Staralfur”, “Agaetis Byrjun”, and “Von”.

© © 2007 Klikk Film. All Rights Reserved.

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Footloose (2011) – Craig Brewer & Dean Pitchford

Craig Brewer & Dean Pitchford - Footloose (2011)  artwork

Footloose (2011)

Craig Brewer & Dean Pitchford

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 7.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: October 14, 2011


The 1984 classic is now the modern hit that will make you stand up and cheer! Big city teen Ren MacCormack (Kenny Wormald) moves to a quiet town and discovers that the hard-line minister has outlawed loud music and dancing. But everything changes when Ren challenges the ban, revitalizing the town and falling in love with the minister’s daughter Ariel (Julianne Hough). Critics and audiences agree “Footloose has an infectious spirit”* so get ready to cut loose! *Alynda Wheat, PEOPLE

© © 2011 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

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James Dean – Single – Dawn Richard


James Dean – Single
Dawn Richard

Release Date:
May 27, 2015
Total Songs:
1

Genre:
Electronic

Price:
$ 0.99

Copyright
℗ 2015 Our Dawn Entertainment


iTunes 100 New Releases

Dean Cain brings KLG, Hoda tasty new S’mores Oreos!

Kathie Lee and Hoda love getting a visit from their one and only Superman, Dean Cain, who chats with the ladies about his upcoming projects and brings them a new Oreo cookie flavor that’s hitting the shelves.




TODAY Pop Culture

Live webcam sex! More than 20000 Hot Girls are waiting for you!

Niji Entertainment GM Dean Schachtel Dies at 49

​Dean Schachtel, GM of Ronnie James Dio’s label and management company, Niji Entertainment Group, passed away suddenly at the age of 49 on …
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Kaycee Dean, Brian Surewood

Kaycee Dean is a hard core and wacky California model that likes pumping older dudes. She’s also a fast talker, who doesn’t shut up unless you muzzle her mouth with a fat meatstick. This deepthroat babe can slurp manmeat with the best of them, and her dripping coochie was built to take a beating. Watch her face get banged silly before she’s flipped on her back and plowed like the girl she is.

I am Eighteen

Heart’s Ann Wilson Marries Dean Wetter At 64

Several decades ago, Heart’s Ann Wilson tried and failed to seduce Dean Wetter. But on Saturday, she finally landed her man as the two tied the knot.

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Dean Sheremet Opens Up About LeAnn Rimes Cheating Scandal

Dean Sheremet gave a recent tell-all interview about his ex-wife LeAnn Rimes’ infamous 2009 cheating scandal with Eddie Cibrian, describing the entire ordeal as a “f—ing disaster” to former Us Weekly staffer Natalie Thomas on her lifestyle blog, Nat’s Next Adventure.
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Need to File for a Divorce!

Kyle Dean Massey Opens Up on Gay ‘Nashville’ Character

Life in the closet is about to get even more complicated for Nashville’s gay country heartthrob Will Lexington, thanks to the arrival of one Kevin Bicks. As Rolling Stone Country revealed last month, actor Kyle Dean Massey has joined the ABC drama, playing an openly gay singer-songwriter who collaborates on…
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Hip to Be Dsquared2: Dean and Dan Caten

Dean and Dan Caten in their Milan office.

These brothers love to tell a story, and they’re anything but grim.

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The Paranormal 13 – Christine Pope, K.A. Poe, Lola St. Vil, Cate Dean, Nadia Scrieva, C. Gockel, Nicole R. Taylor, Kristy Tate, Becca Mills, C.J. Archer, J.J. DiBenedetto, Stacy Claflin, Kyoko M & Dima Zales

Christine Pope, K.A. Poe, Lola St. Vil, Cate Dean, Nadia Scrieva, C. Gockel, Nicole R. Taylor, Kristy Tate, Becca Mills, C.J. Archer, J.J. DiBenedetto, Stacy Claflin, Kyoko M & Dima Zales - The Paranormal 13  artwork

The Paranormal 13

13 free books featuring witches, vampires, werewolves, mermaids, psychics, Loki, time travel, and more!

Christine Pope, K.A. Poe, Lola St. Vil, Cate Dean, Nadia Scrieva, C. Gockel, Nicole R. Taylor, Kristy Tate, Becca Mills, C.J. Archer, J.J. DiBenedetto, Stacy Claflin, Kyoko M & Dima Zales

Genre: Paranormal

Publish Date: December 7, 2014

Publisher: Frostbite Publishing

Seller: Joy Sillesen


14 full-length paranormal and urban fantasy novels featuring witches, vampires, werewolves, mermaids, psychics, Loki, time travel, and more!  1.3 MILLION words! 3,500 PAGES!  Darkangel by Christine Pope  Twin Souls by K.A. Poe  The Girl by Lola St Vil  Rest for the Wicked by Cate Dean  Drowning Mermaids by Nadia Scrieva  Wolves by C. Gockel  The Witch Hunter by Nicole R. Taylor  Beyond the Fortuneteller’s Tent by Kristy Tate  Nolander by Becca Mills  The Medium by C.J. Archer  Dream Student by J.J. DiBendetto  Deception by Stacy Claflin  The Black Parade by Kyoko M  The Thought Readers by Dima Zales  Each of these novels are FULL-LENGTH BOOKS and are the first in each one's respective series.

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How to Train Your Dragon – Dean Deblois & Chris Sanders

Dean Deblois & Chris Sanders - How to Train Your Dragon  artwork

How to Train Your Dragon

Dean Deblois & Chris Sanders

Genre: Kids & Family

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: March 26, 2010


This Academy Award®-nominated DreamWorks Animation film rolls fire-breathing action, epic adventure and big laughs into a captivating, fun and original story. Hiccup is a young Viking who defies tradition and befriends one of his deadliest foes – a ferocious dragon he calls Toothless. Together, the unlikely heroes fight against the odds to save both their worlds in this wonderful, feel-good hit.

© © 2010 DreamWorks Animation L.L.C. All Rights Reserved.

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How to Train Your Dragon 2 – Dean Deblois

Dean Deblois - How to Train Your Dragon 2  artwork

How to Train Your Dragon 2

Dean Deblois

Genre: Kids & Family

Price: $ 19.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: June 13, 2014


From the Academy Award® nominated film DreamWorks How to Train Your Dragon comes the next chapter in the epic trilogy. When Hiccup and Toothless discover a secret ice cave with wild dragons and a mysterious Dragon Rider, the two friends find themselves in an epic battle to save the future of men and dragons! Also includes all new adventure How to Train Your Dragon: Dawn of the Dragon Racers in your iTunes Extras!

© © 2014 DreamWorks Animation, L.L.C. All rights reserved.

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Dean Cain: His Brooke Shields Kiss & Tell?

Access has interviewed Dean Cain many times and he’s never revealed he was Brooke Shields’ first! Until now!


Access Hollywood Latest Videos

KCRW Presents: Dean Wareham

A veteran of Galaxie 500 and Luna, Wareham has dabbled in film along the way. Now he has a fine solo career, which recently brought him to Morning Becomes Eclectic to perform “The Dancer Disappears.”

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Dean McDermott Storms Out of Therapy Session With Tori Spelling in Unseen Footage—Watch Now!

Tori Spelling, Dean McDermottWhile Dean McDermott and Tori Spelling have made it clear that they’re trying to work things out, sometimes their road to reconciling was just too much to handle.

In this…


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Conversations with Echo & The Bunnymen’s Ian McCullouch, LP and Harry Dean Stanton, Plus a Nida/Schumann Download

MATT NIDA & LISA SCHUMANN’S “POLICY OF THRUTH” EXCLUSIVE DOWNLOAD

According to Matt…

“This track was mostly made using Piggy Tracker, which is a little sampler/tracker that runs on handheld games consoles like the Sony PSP. It took quite a few goes to get right; Depeche Mode are very good at disguising quite complicated arrangements with deceptively simple songs and melodies. ‘Violator’ was the first Depeche Mode album I bought, and is still my favourite today! ‘Policy Of Truth’ is the first track Lisa and I did together, and there’s more on the way, plus Lisa Schumann’s solo debut BE BOLD EP will be released the second week in June, as will 8-Bit Operators’ Depeche Mode Tribute.”

2014-06-03-EchoJune3.jpg

A Conversation with Echo & The Bunnymen’s Ian McCulloch

Mike Ragogna: Ian, you have a new album with Echo & The Bunnymen, Meteorites. How do you straddle the solo career and the band?

Ian McCulloch: Hopefully, quite well. I get asked this question a lot, it’s hard to give a definitive answer. Sometimes I feel I need… not so much a break from the Bunnymen, but I need to get certain songs out. The easiest way to explain it is sometimes I feel I write “I” songs and sometimes it feels like I’m writing “we” songs. They cross over slightly, for instance on this album there’s a lot of personal stuff. There’s something in it, maybe it’s the melody lines. There’s another way of describing that or explaining it which isn’t too flattering in one way, but with Bunnymen songs there’s less “woe is me,” or in fact, hopefully on this album no “woe is me,” which is kind of implies that I write my solo stuff “woe is me,” but I’m trying to eradicate that as well. I think that with solo stuff it’s more confessional and I’m kind of taking on blame for the way I am. But I think with the Bunnymen, whatever I say, even if it’s exposing my frailties, I do it in a more angst-ridding way.

MR: How does the process work with you guys creatively these days?

IM: I wrote most of this batch on a bass guitar that kind of didn’t need an app. I’ve started playing basslines on solo stuff and on some of The Fountain. I found I was fairly good at it in a hamfisted way. Basically, after finishing Pro Patria Mori in my flat–it’s a massive flat–in my superflat, which doesn’t mean I’m a mansion-owning Scouser, it’s just bigger than normal, but I’ve managed to turn it into a very… it’s not a hovel, but it’s lived in, if you know what I mean–but the only instrument in the building was a child’s piano with preset drumbeats, which I am going to master for the next album. It’s got about twelve white keys and seven of the black ones. I might write a symphony on it, or whatever Beethoven wrote, I’ll write a few of them. So the only other instrument was a bass guitar, a fairly crap one, a Stagg, it’s called, which is hardly Gibson. But it was the only instrument there, so I started playing that. It was the day after I finished Pro Patria Mori, which had taken so much out of me that I hadn’t even played. So I just started playing basslines, I didn’t know what they were for particularly but they just sounded different. I’d gotten used to [white bottle? 7:16] in that total way that can be brilliant but can also limit where you go. For every C there’s an A minor, for every A minor there’s an F and then a G. I suppose I wanted to break free of that a little bit, but also it was just because I picked up this thing and thought, “Bloody hell, these sound good. They’re cyclical basslines that kind of reminded me of early Bunnymen. I found I was playing in a different key, I got into writing songs in C, which seemed to suit the song but I want to sing the high stuff, and I found that writing things in C make it difficult to go up the octave in the way I can and historically get to do. But by playing these riffs with the open D-string, or playing the twiddly stuff on the G-string. I found that it gave me the octave thing I can do. A lot of people think it’s a hard excuse if it’s up in C, but all of the songs like “The Cutter,” “The Back Of Love,” a lot of those songs were written in D, so it enabled me to use the low voice and the open octave and even the very high falsetto stuff for backing vocals. So I was like, “Wow, this stuff sounds great,” and thne I did early demos of it, added some guitars, spiky, choppy stuff that I used to do early Bunnymen. I was like, “Wow, this sounds like the Bunnymen but now.” Then Youth got involved producing, and we added them to the demos and worked with a few things. They just brought this sound to it, using strings like spiky “Eh-eh-eh-eh,” which again was like the early stuff, it was related to it, but it was the in-laws rather than direct family, if you know what I mean. I went through maybe eighteen months or two years of melancholy depression depression, which I’ve gone to in the past, but it always came in waves, even as a kid, I knew it would come but the wave wouldn’t last that long. I actually enjoyed the waves of melancholy.

MR: What are some things that have happened that have been very significant to you as a professional musician over the years?

IM: One thing is that these waves kind of became tsunamis and I didn’t know when they were going to stop raging, I can’t even snap out of them sometimes. They’re very good for writing songs and stuff, especially the lyrical side, they’re really good for that. My wife used to say, “You do this on purpose, you get into this kind of down thing so you can write songs,” which I used to kind of half admit that was true. But I always seemed to be able to, if not console them, at least ride them. Then over the last few years I had some personal things I won’t go into, but I suppose trying to change your life by facing the waves and trying to prevent them going so long, I’m doing something about them, which could involve loads of things. Accepting that maybe it was more of a problem than something I could just say was part of my personality, no one wants to feel shite for more than a year non-stop. But I think without that I don’t think I would’ve come up with songs like “Meteorites” and “Is This A Breakdown?” So I knew I had to use the way I was feeling, that’s one aspect, and also feeling that a statement had to be made almost with this album, no jokes, no fluffy songs that didn’t really stack up, songs that I wanted people to hear. There were no “half-baked” things going on, I wanted to make sure every breath, every word, every letter counted.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

IM: Every now and then, I bump into people who I like. Glasvegas was one, I said to James [Allan], “Whatever you do, don’t wear white and don’t look like a geisha girl with your next record,” and guess what? He wore white with a little geisha parasol. I also said, “don’t ever go up your own ass and certainly not anyone else’s.” Unfortunately they have a Support Tour with U2 and there’s no margin when you do that. And Jake Bugg is someone I know, we met somewhere in London recently. I think Jake Bugg is fantastic, especially when he does the ballad-y kind of stuff, the slower, less skiffle-y Dylan stuff, which I like as well, but when he writes one of them beautiful ballads they’re kind of beyond his years in a way. I just think he’s great. I told him, “You seem as cool as you get, don’t listen to anyone’s advice apart of mine and don’t go up your own ass or anyone else’s.” That’s the advice I give. If you stick to that, hopefully you’ll still write the great melodies, but even if you don’t you can say to yourself, “I didn’t go up anyone’s ass.” That’s a great rule to live by I think, otherwise you’ve let yourself down. You’ve got to be strong enough to know when you’re good and when you’re brilliant. Jake Bugg is kind of knowing that. It’s going to be tough because he’s a solo act, leading a band. It’s hard when it’s your name and you can’t share that weight of your own sense of who you are. You can share that in a band because it then becomes… The Bunnymen, we know, there was always a underlined, shared knowledge of what we were and it can be defined by what you don’t do. There would be times you can’t possibly do that because it wouldn’t feel right, you know sometimes you can get manipulated, but we were always the vocal bastards of that kind of scene and music. “We don’t do cowboy hats, we don’t do religion, and we don’t do arse licking, never mind arse fucking buttholing.”

MR: Well, I think that answered all of my questions. It’s been an honor talking to you.

IM: Wait, Mike, one question from me. What did you think of the album?

MR: Well, I think it might be my favorite from you guys in a long time. Hope that doesn’t hurt your feelings.

IM: It’s the best insult, you know?

MR: I think so. I’m just hesitant to commit because I need it to be part of my life a little longer.

IM: I agree. At the time, Ocean Rain was a classic but it certainly drones, and this is only fresh off the mixing desk and it already feels like a weighty album.

MR: Also, I think the depth of it reaches further than the others.

IM: Yeah, I agree.

MR: How do you feel about the influence you’re leaving? Echo & The Bunnymen has affected so many bands.

IM: It’s funny because a lot of it I wish I hadn’t influenced because there’s so much shite out there. Hopefully, I’ve influenced people to pout more when they’ve got a pair of lips. I do like the early stuff of Coldplay, the fact that Chris was open about how much we’d influenced him and his band. I think if we helped influence songs like “In My Place” or “Fix You,” then brilliant. I think we had more influence on American bands to be honest, or at least there were more American bands saying how much they loved us, like Pavement, or even the Pixies, at least when I’ve spoken to them they’ve said we were a massive influence. The Flaming Lips, a band I really like, Arcade Fire said we influenced them. I think they’re a great band, to be honest. So yeah, it’s great when you like the actual stuff you’ve influenced. With Arcade Fire I find myself thinking, “God, I wish we sounded like that.” People will say they sound like us. But yeah, I think this album will make people sit up. People like Chris Martin will envy being able to write a song like me. No one can get near that kind of stuff. The race is back on.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne

2014-06-03-LPJune3.jpg

A Conversation with LP

Mike Ragogna: LP, you just released your first full length album, Forever For Now. This is technically your debut album, isn’t it?

LP: Yeah, it’s my major label debut for sure. While it’s great to have an EP and all the stuff that goes with it, as well as the [Citibank] commercial with the song got that me touring a bunch, it definitely set me back making that record. And it’s hard to explain to people; people see no record as non-movement, you know? But there was a lot of movement. You feel like you’re making excuses sometimes, and you’re not, it’s just a process you have to get through. We really spent a lot of time on this record.

MR: Did you spend a lot of time on it also because you were in that mind of it being an introduction of LP, on an LP?

LP: [laughs] Somewhat, yes. You always feel like you want to make it perfect, but I think we also felt like there were different directions we could go, and we just started building it, like putting orchestras on it. It got pretty large. I guess we wanted to make it perfect, to pick the right songs and to complement my voice enough. We put a couple of them on there that were on the EP, as we always intended to. I was touring for a year for “Into the Wild,” and that set us back about a year from recording, and I started writing more songs.

MR: Did you have a goal for this album when you started out? What kind of journey did you take with it, in your opinion?

LP: I wanted the record to certainly have peaks and valleys; a landscape. I didn’t want it to be all the same song. We start really high with “Heavenly Light.” That’s an interesting choice for the opener, and I feel like that song kind of sets you up for the rest of the record, it pumps you up on a high note, then you can receive the rest. So when “Forever For Now” hits you, it’s almost like a lullaby. We go from sunrise to sunset, basically. The thing about “Into The Wild,” is that, while it was a commercial in the US, but I would say that ninety percent of the world has not heard that song. There are so many people that haven’t heard it, like in Europe, for example; that wasn’t a commercial in Europe, so people don’t know it. So I feel like if no one had heard “Into The Wild,” that that would have been the first single. And in a way it was; it was a bit of a setup for the record. That song has a lot of life left in it. I feel like “Into The Wild” and “Tokyo Sunrise” both deserve to be on an actual studio record. The EP was kind of like a teaser, and I really wanted a couple of those songs to be the studio record. Especially “Tokyo Sunrise.”

MR: You did two hundred and fifty shows a year, basically living out of a tiny van. I guess you could call those “Salad days.” What are the major differences for you now versus then?

LP: My days are slightly more structured now, which I think every artist really begs for and wants in their early years. That’s what getting more attention or being more popular gives you. It gives you more of a structure, and there are more things to do that you need to do like, for instance, this interview. Touring and shows are the life’s blood for most musicians I know. It’s the ultimate connection. You go from writing a song in a small room, to playing a song in a bigger venue to people, and that’s the journey and that’s the best part of getting yourself out there.

MR: How is your partnership with [Rob] Cavallo doing these days?

LP: It’s great. We became great friends during the making of this record. He’s a brilliant producer. He knows so much about music and about sound. He’s one of the very few producers that can do the old-school stuff and also understand Pro Tools and all that. It’s interesting to work with a master of sorts. I feel like there’s not that many of them out there, and he’s sonically brilliant.

MR: Were you tempted to re-record your hits with Rihanna and Christina Aguilera, “Cheers (Drink to That)” and “Beautiful People” for this project?

LP: No, not at all. Not even a little. They’re great, but one of the biggest things I discovered during the making of this record the last couple of years has been the difference between songs for me, and songs for other people. I can notice it in a heartbeat now. In fact, upon writing “Into The Wild,” “Someday” and “Wasted Love,” I really feel that no one but I can sing those songs. Like “Tokyo Sunrise” is one of those songs that I know is mine.

MR: When you did the first playback of that album, were there any surprises about yourself or any of the songs?

LP: I was kind of surprised where a couple of the songs took me. We went a little pop on some songs, which is probably my songwriting for other people creeping in a little bit, but that’s just part of who I am. I have a couple of different things in me insofar as how I write and what I like to hear. But when you have a record, it’s a lot of listening to the same songs, so it’s difficult to keep perspective. But if I remember correctly, when I hadn’t quite lost my perspective with this record after hearing it over and over, it packed a good wallop.

MR: Are there any songs in particular where you felt like, “Wow, I really discovered something about myself”?

LP: Yeah, “Tokyo” for sure is the apex for me in this record. I loved writing it and I loved singing it. It’s got a bit of a Fleetwood Mac vibe, which was a surprise, and was something I didn’t intend to do.

MR: Are there any songs on there which might be the closest or most personal to you?

LP: “Tokyo” and “Forever For Now” are very deep for me. I’m close with all of them, and “Into The Wild” for sure; I feel like I’ve got almost every part of my voice that I would want people to hear first. If I was trying to get people to know what I sounded like, I would play them that or “Tokyo.”

MR: Having just put out a project of twelve songs and bonus tracks, is there some kind of almost post-partum-like letdown that you feel?

LP: Absolutely. My friends can sense a kind of malaise, and I think it’s just what you go through right before a record comes out, because there’s no more talking about it. You get signed, there’s all this promise; you write songs, there’s all this promise; you record, there’s all this promise, promise, promise. And then you have this thing and it’s getting printed thousands of times on vinyl and CDs and now there’s no going back. You’re going to present this thing, and that’s it. It’s kind of like your kid going off to college, you know, you’ve done everything you can.

MR: In the same sense, parents sometime think, “Oh, maybe if I’d done this or that…” Chances are, every artist probably approaches their work and thinks, “Okay, it’s sort of finished…”

LP: Oh yeah, I feel like that. There are some things that I might change, but they’re there now, and I’m proud of this record. Records are good for showing where you were at a certain time, and I think this definitely shows that.

MR: Does it feel at all like the record is the skeleton and you’re going to “flesh it out” more with the live shows, etc.?

LP: Definitely. What’s interesting is that I haven’t really played a whole bunch of shows, especially the actual touring in clubs, which is when you really flesh out and kind of take on a new life, so to speak. That part’s exciting to think about; playing songs for people and seeing their responses makes you fall in love with the record again.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

LP: Write songs, and keep writing. Even if you think you wrote the best song you’ve ever written, keep writing. My record’s not even out yet, and I’ve started writing for myself again. You can’t go too long patting yourself on the back even if you wrote the greatest record ever. Radiohead didn’t just stand there and applaud themselves forever after they wrote The Bends. They kept writing and changing and I think that’s what you have to do regardless of what stage you’re at. So for new artists it’s really important to keep going and producing songs and trying them out on people. And play live, and get better at connecting with and playing for people, because people really notice it when you can perform well, and it helps a lot.

MR: Nice. You could easily slip into the role of mentor.

LP: Well, I do it naturally with my friends who are starting or trying to do stuff, so I’m sure when the opportunity arises, I do take it and will take it.

MR: So you’re not doing two hundred and fifty days a year anymore, but I imagine with the new album out, you’ll be supporting it with a tour?

LP: Definitely, that’s a major thing, and I’m very much looking forward to it. One of the things I do best as far as this whole thing goes is performing the songs. That’s the ultimate payoff for me. I feel my best when I can take it all the way there. It’s a really good feeling to write a song and then perform it, and I think a lot of performers would agree.

MR: Beautiful. What advice do you have for yourself at this point?

LP: I’d say don’t get too ahead of myself, and try to keep my expectations low and my work ethic high. That’s easy to say, but you start to get expectations, especially when good things happen and you think, “Oh, well maybe it could go this way.” I just want to enjoy what’s happening and be present and not get too ahead of myself. I hate anytime I get offstage and feel like I didn’t really “absorb” that experience. That’s my main goal, to absorb what’s happening around me as it’s happening.

MR: You’re absorbing a lot right now, aren’t you.

LP: Yeah, it’s good though. I just try to keep calm and get a little Buddhist about it, not too high or too low.

MR: You must be so stoked about this album, though.

LP: I am, and I look forward to people hearing it. It’s definitely a whole piece, which was the goal. Something you could play start to finish that all sounds good together.

MR: You’re awesome and I really appreciate your time. Hopefully the next time we talk, you’re a household name.

LP: Thanks, Mike. I really appreciate it, you’re so sweet. Talk soon!

Transcribed by Emily Fotis

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A Conversation with Harry Dean Stanton

Mike Ragogna: How fictional is Partly Fiction?

Harry Dean Stanton: It’s all fiction. It’s all a dream. Life is all a dream.

MR: How did the project begin?

HDS: It started with Sophie [Huber], we used to go out a long time ago. She was the whole thing.

MR: She directed the documentary.

HDS: Yeah.

MR: The documentary has been screened at over fifty festivals in the US and internationally. How do you think it went over?

HDS: I’ve been getting a good response from all over.

MR: You have a lot of well-known songs on here, many of them are almost classics. David Lynch is quoted as saying he loves your version of “Everybody’s Talkin’.”

HDS: Yeah, that’s a heroin song. It was written on heroin. Fred Neil and Lou [Casteou?] was an actor, they were friends, I think they were both on heroin when they got the idea. Harry Nilsson made a hit out of it, but he made a rock ‘n’ roll song, which is not a heroin song.

MR: The essence of it is in how you did it, right?

HDS: Yeah.

MR: You recorded “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain,” which, when it’s sung by you, takes on a different kind of feel.

HDS: Yeah, that’s a good song. All the songs are well-written. That was a quote about the album, the writing of the songs let the songs sell themselves.

MR: They’re like self-reflections?

HDS: They’re all well-written.

MR: What did you relate to in each of the songs? That they were well-written or that they related to your life in some way?

HDS: “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain” was related to Rebecca De Mornay, I used to go out with her, she loved the song.

MR: So a lot of these are very personal, with your memories relating to the music.

HDS: They’re songs I’ve heard over the years that resonated with me.

MR: You also recorded “Canción Mixteca” with Ry Cooder.

HDS: Yeah, that was on a soundtrack album, it was the theme song in Paris, Texas.

MR: Did it feel good recording it again for that project? Did it take you back?

HDS: Oh yeah, I love it, it’s a beautiful song.

MR: You do a couple of traditionals as well, for instance, “Danny Boy.”

HDS: That was actually written by an Englishman I think, but it has close Irish ties. It’s kind of the Irish national anthem. For years, I thought it was a mother singing to her son, “Danny Boy,” but it was a father who had lost two sons in two wars and this was his youngest son going into World War One. That’s what the song’s about.

MR: You have an interesting convergence of being an actor and being a musician. Do those two arts compliment each other? Like when you’re singing a song, do you think your acting abilities let you pull out the more emotionally significant lines, etc.?

HDS: Oh yeah, there’s no difference really. If you’re a good singer, you can be an actor. As a matter of fact, anybody can be a film actor. A man off the street can be a film actor if he’s got a good director.

MR: But certainly that’s not how you feel about your own career, right? You feel like you’re a good actor, no?

HDS: Oh yeah.

MR: But there are degrees of being able to interpret a script, I’m sure your musical interpretation gives you little more skill at acting.

HDS: Anybody can relate to any part that’s written, a murderer, a lover, an authority figure, it doesn’t matter, they’re all universal.

MR: The documentary has some of your friends as guests, Sam Shepard, Wim Wenders, Deborah Harry, and Kris Kristofferson. When you hear them talk about their interaction with you and what you mean to them, what do you think at this point? How does it affect you?

HDS: It’s a nice feeling. I like all of those people. What else can I say?

MR: Does it touch you on a deeper level because of the personal friendships and relationships you have with them?

HDS: Oh yeah, we’re all close friends.

MR: You’re accompanied by Jamie James and Don Was, what do you think of how the album turned out as far as musicianship?

HDS: I think it’s all good. I haven’t heard the album yet but I think I saw one cut of the film. They’re all great people, talented musicians, I’m very fortunate.

MR: Were there any roles that were particularly special to you?

HDS: Oh yeah, Paris, Texas is my favorite movie. All of them had something going on, all of them appealed to me.

MR: Sophie is very up front about her friendship with you, how you met in the nineties and have been friends ever since. She’s the one who came up with the idea to make this, but when you were recording the songs for this, did she have the idea of how this was going to turn out ultimately?

HDS: It all just developed and unfolded naturally.

MR: Were there any surprises for you in the documentary?

HDS: I can’t remember anything at the moment.

MR: That’s okay. Are there any songs on Partly Fiction that really, really resonate with you?

HDS: They all do. “Danny Boy,” “Canción Mixteca,” all of them do.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

HDS: Don’t try. Let it happen.

MR: And that’s how it happened with you?

HDS: Yeah, just let it happen. Everything unfolds, I had nothing to do with it.

MR: How did you get into music initially?

HDS: I don’t know, I was just born with a good ear. I was singing when I was six years old. When nobody was home, I would get up on a stool and sing. I was in love with an eighteen year-old house sitter. Her name was Thelma. I’d get up and sing. Who wrote that song? Early country western writers, “The Singing Brakeman” they called him. It was the first song I ever remember, “T For Texas.”

MR: Jimmie Rodgers, and he was an inspiration for you as a kid?

HDS: Yes, that was the first song I remember.

MR: Were you encouraged by your family to do more music?

HDS: My mother sang, she taught me some Irish songs. My mother was Irish. I sang with my brothers, we had a barbershop quartet. The three of us, and I forget who the fourth one was. In high school and college I always sang in glee clubs and barbershop quartets.

MR: Do you remember any of the songs?

HDS: Let’s see, there was a famous organization called Yhe Barbershop Singers of America, “Those good old songs for me, I love to hear those minor chords and four-part harmony.”

MR: What advice do you have for actors?

HDS: Play yourself. That’s what I do.

MR: Similar advice to the musicians.

HDS: Yeah.

MR: You’ve taken roles you’ve wanted to play and related to the parts, right?

HDS: I’ve made some good choices.

MR: What are some choices coming up after Partly Fiction is a hit?

HDS: I haven’t a clue.

MR: What do you want to do?

HDS: I can’t answer that, I have to wait and see what I do. The best approach was Jack Nicholson, I did Ride In The Whirlwind with him, you know that film? He called me and said, “I’ve got a part for you, but I don’t want you to do anything. Let the wardrobe do the character.” I’d been thinking along those lines anyway, so that solidified my whole approach to acting. I played myself and let the wardrobe do the character.

MR: And that’s exactly what you said toward the beginning of this interview, you just let things unfold.

HDS: Yeah, it’s a whole eastern approach. Taoism, Buddhism, and the real Jewish Kabbalah, not the organized one. Most Jews don’t get it and most Christians don’t get it either. The real Kabbalah is the same as Buddhim and Taoism.

MR: Are you pretty spiritual?

HDS: Spiritual, yeah, but I don’t believe in any religions. Not even the eastern ones. Once they’re organized, it’s all over.

MR: Do you think spirituality is at the bottom of your art? Do you think it’s what your creative juices come from?

HDS: Again, there’s no real answer to that. Everything unfolds naturally. Ultimately there’s no answer to the whole existence on the planet, really, there’s no answer to it. Nobody’s in charge. It all just happens.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne
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Conversations with Echo & The Bunnymen’s Ian McCullouch, LP and Harry Dean Stanton, Plus a Nida/Schumann Download

MATT NIDA & LISA SCHUMANN’S “POLICY OF THRUTH” EXCLUSIVE DOWNLOAD

According to Matt…

“This track was mostly made using Piggy Tracker, which is a little sampler/tracker that runs on handheld games consoles like the Sony PSP. It took quite a few goes to get right; Depeche Mode are very good at disguising quite complicated arrangements with deceptively simple songs and melodies. ‘Violator’ was the first Depeche Mode album I bought, and is still my favourite today! ‘Policy Of Truth’ is the first track Lisa and I did together, and there’s more on the way, plus Lisa Schumann’s solo debut BE BOLD EP will be released the second week in June, as will 8-Bit Operators’ Depeche Mode Tribute.”

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A Conversation with Echo & The Bunnymen’s Ian McCulloch

Mike Ragogna: Ian, you have a new album with Echo & The Bunnymen, Meteorites. How do you straddle the solo career and the band?

Ian McCulloch: Hopefully, quite well. I get asked this question a lot, it’s hard to give a definitive answer. Sometimes I feel I need… not so much a break from the Bunnymen, but I need to get certain songs out. The easiest way to explain it is sometimes I feel I write “I” songs and sometimes it feels like I’m writing “we” songs. They cross over slightly, for instance on this album there’s a lot of personal stuff. There’s something in it, maybe it’s the melody lines. There’s another way of describing that or explaining it which isn’t too flattering in one way, but with Bunnymen songs there’s less “woe is me,” or in fact, hopefully on this album no “woe is me,” which is kind of implies that I write my solo stuff “woe is me,” but I’m trying to eradicate that as well. I think that with solo stuff it’s more confessional and I’m kind of taking on blame for the way I am. But I think with the Bunnymen, whatever I say, even if it’s exposing my frailties, I do it in a more angst-ridding way.

MR: How does the process work with you guys creatively these days?

IM: I wrote most of this batch on a bass guitar that kind of didn’t need an app. I’ve started playing basslines on solo stuff and on some of The Fountain. I found I was fairly good at it in a hamfisted way. Basically, after finishing Pro Patria Mori in my flat–it’s a massive flat–in my superflat, which doesn’t mean I’m a mansion-owning Scouser, it’s just bigger than normal, but I’ve managed to turn it into a very… it’s not a hovel, but it’s lived in, if you know what I mean–but the only instrument in the building was a child’s piano with preset drumbeats, which I am going to master for the next album. It’s got about twelve white keys and seven of the black ones. I might write a symphony on it, or whatever Beethoven wrote, I’ll write a few of them. So the only other instrument was a bass guitar, a fairly crap one, a Stagg, it’s called, which is hardly Gibson. But it was the only instrument there, so I started playing that. It was the day after I finished Pro Patria Mori, which had taken so much out of me that I hadn’t even played. So I just started playing basslines, I didn’t know what they were for particularly but they just sounded different. I’d gotten used to [white bottle? 7:16] in that total way that can be brilliant but can also limit where you go. For every C there’s an A minor, for every A minor there’s an F and then a G. I suppose I wanted to break free of that a little bit, but also it was just because I picked up this thing and thought, “Bloody hell, these sound good. They’re cyclical basslines that kind of reminded me of early Bunnymen. I found I was playing in a different key, I got into writing songs in C, which seemed to suit the song but I want to sing the high stuff, and I found that writing things in C make it difficult to go up the octave in the way I can and historically get to do. But by playing these riffs with the open D-string, or playing the twiddly stuff on the G-string. I found that it gave me the octave thing I can do. A lot of people think it’s a hard excuse if it’s up in C, but all of the songs like “The Cutter,” “The Back Of Love,” a lot of those songs were written in D, so it enabled me to use the low voice and the open octave and even the very high falsetto stuff for backing vocals. So I was like, “Wow, this stuff sounds great,” and thne I did early demos of it, added some guitars, spiky, choppy stuff that I used to do early Bunnymen. I was like, “Wow, this sounds like the Bunnymen but now.” Then Youth got involved producing, and we added them to the demos and worked with a few things. They just brought this sound to it, using strings like spiky “Eh-eh-eh-eh,” which again was like the early stuff, it was related to it, but it was the in-laws rather than direct family, if you know what I mean. I went through maybe eighteen months or two years of melancholy depression depression, which I’ve gone to in the past, but it always came in waves, even as a kid, I knew it would come but the wave wouldn’t last that long. I actually enjoyed the waves of melancholy.

MR: What are some things that have happened that have been very significant to you as a professional musician over the years?

IM: One thing is that these waves kind of became tsunamis and I didn’t know when they were going to stop raging, I can’t even snap out of them sometimes. They’re very good for writing songs and stuff, especially the lyrical side, they’re really good for that. My wife used to say, “You do this on purpose, you get into this kind of down thing so you can write songs,” which I used to kind of half admit that was true. But I always seemed to be able to, if not console them, at least ride them. Then over the last few years I had some personal things I won’t go into, but I suppose trying to change your life by facing the waves and trying to prevent them going so long, I’m doing something about them, which could involve loads of things. Accepting that maybe it was more of a problem than something I could just say was part of my personality, no one wants to feel shite for more than a year non-stop. But I think without that I don’t think I would’ve come up with songs like “Meteorites” and “Is This A Breakdown?” So I knew I had to use the way I was feeling, that’s one aspect, and also feeling that a statement had to be made almost with this album, no jokes, no fluffy songs that didn’t really stack up, songs that I wanted people to hear. There were no “half-baked” things going on, I wanted to make sure every breath, every word, every letter counted.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

IM: Every now and then, I bump into people who I like. Glasvegas was one, I said to James [Allan], “Whatever you do, don’t wear white and don’t look like a geisha girl with your next record,” and guess what? He wore white with a little geisha parasol. I also said, “don’t ever go up your own ass and certainly not anyone else’s.” Unfortunately they have a Support Tour with U2 and there’s no margin when you do that. And Jake Bugg is someone I know, we met somewhere in London recently. I think Jake Bugg is fantastic, especially when he does the ballad-y kind of stuff, the slower, less skiffle-y Dylan stuff, which I like as well, but when he writes one of them beautiful ballads they’re kind of beyond his years in a way. I just think he’s great. I told him, “You seem as cool as you get, don’t listen to anyone’s advice apart of mine and don’t go up your own ass or anyone else’s.” That’s the advice I give. If you stick to that, hopefully you’ll still write the great melodies, but even if you don’t you can say to yourself, “I didn’t go up anyone’s ass.” That’s a great rule to live by I think, otherwise you’ve let yourself down. You’ve got to be strong enough to know when you’re good and when you’re brilliant. Jake Bugg is kind of knowing that. It’s going to be tough because he’s a solo act, leading a band. It’s hard when it’s your name and you can’t share that weight of your own sense of who you are. You can share that in a band because it then becomes… The Bunnymen, we know, there was always a underlined, shared knowledge of what we were and it can be defined by what you don’t do. There would be times you can’t possibly do that because it wouldn’t feel right, you know sometimes you can get manipulated, but we were always the vocal bastards of that kind of scene and music. “We don’t do cowboy hats, we don’t do religion, and we don’t do arse licking, never mind arse fucking buttholing.”

MR: Well, I think that answered all of my questions. It’s been an honor talking to you.

IM: Wait, Mike, one question from me. What did you think of the album?

MR: Well, I think it might be my favorite from you guys in a long time. Hope that doesn’t hurt your feelings.

IM: It’s the best insult, you know?

MR: I think so. I’m just hesitant to commit because I need it to be part of my life a little longer.

IM: I agree. At the time, Ocean Rain was a classic but it certainly drones, and this is only fresh off the mixing desk and it already feels like a weighty album.

MR: Also, I think the depth of it reaches further than the others.

IM: Yeah, I agree.

MR: How do you feel about the influence you’re leaving? Echo & The Bunnymen has affected so many bands.

IM: It’s funny because a lot of it I wish I hadn’t influenced because there’s so much shite out there. Hopefully, I’ve influenced people to pout more when they’ve got a pair of lips. I do like the early stuff of Coldplay, the fact that Chris was open about how much we’d influenced him and his band. I think if we helped influence songs like “In My Place” or “Fix You,” then brilliant. I think we had more influence on American bands to be honest, or at least there were more American bands saying how much they loved us, like Pavement, or even the Pixies, at least when I’ve spoken to them they’ve said we were a massive influence. The Flaming Lips, a band I really like, Arcade Fire said we influenced them. I think they’re a great band, to be honest. So yeah, it’s great when you like the actual stuff you’ve influenced. With Arcade Fire I find myself thinking, “God, I wish we sounded like that.” People will say they sound like us. But yeah, I think this album will make people sit up. People like Chris Martin will envy being able to write a song like me. No one can get near that kind of stuff. The race is back on.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with LP

Mike Ragogna: LP, you just released your first full length album, Forever For Now. This is technically your debut album, isn’t it?

LP: Yeah, it’s my major label debut for sure. While it’s great to have an EP and all the stuff that goes with it, as well as the [Citibank] commercial with the song got that me touring a bunch, it definitely set me back making that record. And it’s hard to explain to people; people see no record as non-movement, you know? But there was a lot of movement. You feel like you’re making excuses sometimes, and you’re not, it’s just a process you have to get through. We really spent a lot of time on this record.

MR: Did you spend a lot of time on it also because you were in that mind of it being an introduction of LP, on an LP?

LP: [laughs] Somewhat, yes. You always feel like you want to make it perfect, but I think we also felt like there were different directions we could go, and we just started building it, like putting orchestras on it. It got pretty large. I guess we wanted to make it perfect, to pick the right songs and to complement my voice enough. We put a couple of them on there that were on the EP, as we always intended to. I was touring for a year for “Into the Wild,” and that set us back about a year from recording, and I started writing more songs.

MR: Did you have a goal for this album when you started out? What kind of journey did you take with it, in your opinion?

LP: I wanted the record to certainly have peaks and valleys; a landscape. I didn’t want it to be all the same song. We start really high with “Heavenly Light.” That’s an interesting choice for the opener, and I feel like that song kind of sets you up for the rest of the record, it pumps you up on a high note, then you can receive the rest. So when “Forever For Now” hits you, it’s almost like a lullaby. We go from sunrise to sunset, basically. The thing about “Into The Wild,” is that, while it was a commercial in the US, but I would say that ninety percent of the world has not heard that song. There are so many people that haven’t heard it, like in Europe, for example; that wasn’t a commercial in Europe, so people don’t know it. So I feel like if no one had heard “Into The Wild,” that that would have been the first single. And in a way it was; it was a bit of a setup for the record. That song has a lot of life left in it. I feel like “Into The Wild” and “Tokyo Sunrise” both deserve to be on an actual studio record. The EP was kind of like a teaser, and I really wanted a couple of those songs to be the studio record. Especially “Tokyo Sunrise.”

MR: You did two hundred and fifty shows a year, basically living out of a tiny van. I guess you could call those “Salad days.” What are the major differences for you now versus then?

LP: My days are slightly more structured now, which I think every artist really begs for and wants in their early years. That’s what getting more attention or being more popular gives you. It gives you more of a structure, and there are more things to do that you need to do like, for instance, this interview. Touring and shows are the life’s blood for most musicians I know. It’s the ultimate connection. You go from writing a song in a small room, to playing a song in a bigger venue to people, and that’s the journey and that’s the best part of getting yourself out there.

MR: How is your partnership with [Rob] Cavallo doing these days?

LP: It’s great. We became great friends during the making of this record. He’s a brilliant producer. He knows so much about music and about sound. He’s one of the very few producers that can do the old-school stuff and also understand Pro Tools and all that. It’s interesting to work with a master of sorts. I feel like there’s not that many of them out there, and he’s sonically brilliant.

MR: Were you tempted to re-record your hits with Rihanna and Christina Aguilera, “Cheers (Drink to That)” and “Beautiful People” for this project?

LP: No, not at all. Not even a little. They’re great, but one of the biggest things I discovered during the making of this record the last couple of years has been the difference between songs for me, and songs for other people. I can notice it in a heartbeat now. In fact, upon writing “Into The Wild,” “Someday” and “Wasted Love,” I really feel that no one but I can sing those songs. Like “Tokyo Sunrise” is one of those songs that I know is mine.

MR: When you did the first playback of that album, were there any surprises about yourself or any of the songs?

LP: I was kind of surprised where a couple of the songs took me. We went a little pop on some songs, which is probably my songwriting for other people creeping in a little bit, but that’s just part of who I am. I have a couple of different things in me insofar as how I write and what I like to hear. But when you have a record, it’s a lot of listening to the same songs, so it’s difficult to keep perspective. But if I remember correctly, when I hadn’t quite lost my perspective with this record after hearing it over and over, it packed a good wallop.

MR: Are there any songs in particular where you felt like, “Wow, I really discovered something about myself”?

LP: Yeah, “Tokyo” for sure is the apex for me in this record. I loved writing it and I loved singing it. It’s got a bit of a Fleetwood Mac vibe, which was a surprise, and was something I didn’t intend to do.

MR: Are there any songs on there which might be the closest or most personal to you?

LP: “Tokyo” and “Forever For Now” are very deep for me. I’m close with all of them, and “Into The Wild” for sure; I feel like I’ve got almost every part of my voice that I would want people to hear first. If I was trying to get people to know what I sounded like, I would play them that or “Tokyo.”

MR: Having just put out a project of twelve songs and bonus tracks, is there some kind of almost post-partum-like letdown that you feel?

LP: Absolutely. My friends can sense a kind of malaise, and I think it’s just what you go through right before a record comes out, because there’s no more talking about it. You get signed, there’s all this promise; you write songs, there’s all this promise; you record, there’s all this promise, promise, promise. And then you have this thing and it’s getting printed thousands of times on vinyl and CDs and now there’s no going back. You’re going to present this thing, and that’s it. It’s kind of like your kid going off to college, you know, you’ve done everything you can.

MR: In the same sense, parents sometime think, “Oh, maybe if I’d done this or that…” Chances are, every artist probably approaches their work and thinks, “Okay, it’s sort of finished…”

LP: Oh yeah, I feel like that. There are some things that I might change, but they’re there now, and I’m proud of this record. Records are good for showing where you were at a certain time, and I think this definitely shows that.

MR: Does it feel at all like the record is the skeleton and you’re going to “flesh it out” more with the live shows, etc.?

LP: Definitely. What’s interesting is that I haven’t really played a whole bunch of shows, especially the actual touring in clubs, which is when you really flesh out and kind of take on a new life, so to speak. That part’s exciting to think about; playing songs for people and seeing their responses makes you fall in love with the record again.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

LP: Write songs, and keep writing. Even if you think you wrote the best song you’ve ever written, keep writing. My record’s not even out yet, and I’ve started writing for myself again. You can’t go too long patting yourself on the back even if you wrote the greatest record ever. Radiohead didn’t just stand there and applaud themselves forever after they wrote The Bends. They kept writing and changing and I think that’s what you have to do regardless of what stage you’re at. So for new artists it’s really important to keep going and producing songs and trying them out on people. And play live, and get better at connecting with and playing for people, because people really notice it when you can perform well, and it helps a lot.

MR: Nice. You could easily slip into the role of mentor.

LP: Well, I do it naturally with my friends who are starting or trying to do stuff, so I’m sure when the opportunity arises, I do take it and will take it.

MR: So you’re not doing two hundred and fifty days a year anymore, but I imagine with the new album out, you’ll be supporting it with a tour?

LP: Definitely, that’s a major thing, and I’m very much looking forward to it. One of the things I do best as far as this whole thing goes is performing the songs. That’s the ultimate payoff for me. I feel my best when I can take it all the way there. It’s a really good feeling to write a song and then perform it, and I think a lot of performers would agree.

MR: Beautiful. What advice do you have for yourself at this point?

LP: I’d say don’t get too ahead of myself, and try to keep my expectations low and my work ethic high. That’s easy to say, but you start to get expectations, especially when good things happen and you think, “Oh, well maybe it could go this way.” I just want to enjoy what’s happening and be present and not get too ahead of myself. I hate anytime I get offstage and feel like I didn’t really “absorb” that experience. That’s my main goal, to absorb what’s happening around me as it’s happening.

MR: You’re absorbing a lot right now, aren’t you.

LP: Yeah, it’s good though. I just try to keep calm and get a little Buddhist about it, not too high or too low.

MR: You must be so stoked about this album, though.

LP: I am, and I look forward to people hearing it. It’s definitely a whole piece, which was the goal. Something you could play start to finish that all sounds good together.

MR: You’re awesome and I really appreciate your time. Hopefully the next time we talk, you’re a household name.

LP: Thanks, Mike. I really appreciate it, you’re so sweet. Talk soon!

Transcribed by Emily Fotis

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A Conversation with Harry Dean Stanton

Mike Ragogna: How fictional is Partly Fiction?

Harry Dean Stanton: It’s all fiction. It’s all a dream. Life is all a dream.

MR: How did the project begin?

HDS: It started with Sophie [Huber], we used to go out a long time ago. She was the whole thing.

MR: She directed the documentary.

HDS: Yeah.

MR: The documentary has been screened at over fifty festivals in the US and internationally. How do you think it went over?

HDS: I’ve been getting a good response from all over.

MR: You have a lot of well-known songs on here, many of them are almost classics. David Lynch is quoted as saying he loves your version of “Everybody’s Talkin’.”

HDS: Yeah, that’s a heroin song. It was written on heroin. Fred Neil and Lou [Casteou?] was an actor, they were friends, I think they were both on heroin when they got the idea. Harry Nilsson made a hit out of it, but he made a rock ‘n’ roll song, which is not a heroin song.

MR: The essence of it is in how you did it, right?

HDS: Yeah.

MR: You recorded “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain,” which, when it’s sung by you, takes on a different kind of feel.

HDS: Yeah, that’s a good song. All the songs are well-written. That was a quote about the album, the writing of the songs let the songs sell themselves.

MR: They’re like self-reflections?

HDS: They’re all well-written.

MR: What did you relate to in each of the songs? That they were well-written or that they related to your life in some way?

HDS: “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain” was related to Rebecca De Mornay, I used to go out with her, she loved the song.

MR: So a lot of these are very personal, with your memories relating to the music.

HDS: They’re songs I’ve heard over the years that resonated with me.

MR: You also recorded “Canción Mixteca” with Ry Cooder.

HDS: Yeah, that was on a soundtrack album, it was the theme song in Paris, Texas.

MR: Did it feel good recording it again for that project? Did it take you back?

HDS: Oh yeah, I love it, it’s a beautiful song.

MR: You do a couple of traditionals as well, for instance, “Danny Boy.”

HDS: That was actually written by an Englishman I think, but it has close Irish ties. It’s kind of the Irish national anthem. For years, I thought it was a mother singing to her son, “Danny Boy,” but it was a father who had lost two sons in two wars and this was his youngest son going into World War One. That’s what the song’s about.

MR: You have an interesting convergence of being an actor and being a musician. Do those two arts compliment each other? Like when you’re singing a song, do you think your acting abilities let you pull out the more emotionally significant lines, etc.?

HDS: Oh yeah, there’s no difference really. If you’re a good singer, you can be an actor. As a matter of fact, anybody can be a film actor. A man off the street can be a film actor if he’s got a good director.

MR: But certainly that’s not how you feel about your own career, right? You feel like you’re a good actor, no?

HDS: Oh yeah.

MR: But there are degrees of being able to interpret a script, I’m sure your musical interpretation gives you little more skill at acting.

HDS: Anybody can relate to any part that’s written, a murderer, a lover, an authority figure, it doesn’t matter, they’re all universal.

MR: The documentary has some of your friends as guests, Sam Shepard, Wim Wenders, Deborah Harry, and Kris Kristofferson. When you hear them talk about their interaction with you and what you mean to them, what do you think at this point? How does it affect you?

HDS: It’s a nice feeling. I like all of those people. What else can I say?

MR: Does it touch you on a deeper level because of the personal friendships and relationships you have with them?

HDS: Oh yeah, we’re all close friends.

MR: You’re accompanied by Jamie James and Don Was, what do you think of how the album turned out as far as musicianship?

HDS: I think it’s all good. I haven’t heard the album yet but I think I saw one cut of the film. They’re all great people, talented musicians, I’m very fortunate.

MR: Were there any roles that were particularly special to you?

HDS: Oh yeah, Paris, Texas is my favorite movie. All of them had something going on, all of them appealed to me.

MR: Sophie is very up front about her friendship with you, how you met in the nineties and have been friends ever since. She’s the one who came up with the idea to make this, but when you were recording the songs for this, did she have the idea of how this was going to turn out ultimately?

HDS: It all just developed and unfolded naturally.

MR: Were there any surprises for you in the documentary?

HDS: I can’t remember anything at the moment.

MR: That’s okay. Are there any songs on Partly Fiction that really, really resonate with you?

HDS: They all do. “Danny Boy,” “Canción Mixteca,” all of them do.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

HDS: Don’t try. Let it happen.

MR: And that’s how it happened with you?

HDS: Yeah, just let it happen. Everything unfolds, I had nothing to do with it.

MR: How did you get into music initially?

HDS: I don’t know, I was just born with a good ear. I was singing when I was six years old. When nobody was home, I would get up on a stool and sing. I was in love with an eighteen year-old house sitter. Her name was Thelma. I’d get up and sing. Who wrote that song? Early country western writers, “The Singing Brakeman” they called him. It was the first song I ever remember, “T For Texas.”

MR: Jimmie Rodgers, and he was an inspiration for you as a kid?

HDS: Yes, that was the first song I remember.

MR: Were you encouraged by your family to do more music?

HDS: My mother sang, she taught me some Irish songs. My mother was Irish. I sang with my brothers, we had a barbershop quartet. The three of us, and I forget who the fourth one was. In high school and college I always sang in glee clubs and barbershop quartets.

MR: Do you remember any of the songs?

HDS: Let’s see, there was a famous organization called Yhe Barbershop Singers of America, “Those good old songs for me, I love to hear those minor chords and four-part harmony.”

MR: What advice do you have for actors?

HDS: Play yourself. That’s what I do.

MR: Similar advice to the musicians.

HDS: Yeah.

MR: You’ve taken roles you’ve wanted to play and related to the parts, right?

HDS: I’ve made some good choices.

MR: What are some choices coming up after Partly Fiction is a hit?

HDS: I haven’t a clue.

MR: What do you want to do?

HDS: I can’t answer that, I have to wait and see what I do. The best approach was Jack Nicholson, I did Ride In The Whirlwind with him, you know that film? He called me and said, “I’ve got a part for you, but I don’t want you to do anything. Let the wardrobe do the character.” I’d been thinking along those lines anyway, so that solidified my whole approach to acting. I played myself and let the wardrobe do the character.

MR: And that’s exactly what you said toward the beginning of this interview, you just let things unfold.

HDS: Yeah, it’s a whole eastern approach. Taoism, Buddhism, and the real Jewish Kabbalah, not the organized one. Most Jews don’t get it and most Christians don’t get it either. The real Kabbalah is the same as Buddhim and Taoism.

MR: Are you pretty spiritual?

HDS: Spiritual, yeah, but I don’t believe in any religions. Not even the eastern ones. Once they’re organized, it’s all over.

MR: Do you think spirituality is at the bottom of your art? Do you think it’s what your creative juices come from?

HDS: Again, there’s no real answer to that. Everything unfolds naturally. Ultimately there’s no answer to the whole existence on the planet, really, there’s no answer to it. Nobody’s in charge. It all just happens.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne
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Conversations with Echo & The Bunnymen’s Ian McCullouch, LP and Harry Dean Stanton, Plus a Nida/Schumann Download

MATT NIDA & LISA SCHUMANN’S “POLICY OF THRUTH” EXCLUSIVE DOWNLOAD

According to Matt…

“This track was mostly made using Piggy Tracker, which is a little sampler/tracker that runs on handheld games consoles like the Sony PSP. It took quite a few goes to get right; Depeche Mode are very good at disguising quite complicated arrangements with deceptively simple songs and melodies. ‘Violator’ was the first Depeche Mode album I bought, and is still my favourite today! ‘Policy Of Truth’ is the first track Lisa and I did together, and there’s more on the way, plus Lisa Schumann’s solo debut BE BOLD EP will be released the second week in June, as will 8-Bit Operators’ Depeche Mode Tribute.”

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A Conversation with Echo & The Bunnymen’s Ian McCulloch

Mike Ragogna: Ian, you have a new album with Echo & The Bunnymen, Meteorites. How do you straddle the solo career and the band?

Ian McCulloch: Hopefully, quite well. I get asked this question a lot, it’s hard to give a definitive answer. Sometimes I feel I need… not so much a break from the Bunnymen, but I need to get certain songs out. The easiest way to explain it is sometimes I feel I write “I” songs and sometimes it feels like I’m writing “we” songs. They cross over slightly, for instance on this album there’s a lot of personal stuff. There’s something in it, maybe it’s the melody lines. There’s another way of describing that or explaining it which isn’t too flattering in one way, but with Bunnymen songs there’s less “woe is me,” or in fact, hopefully on this album no “woe is me,” which is kind of implies that I write my solo stuff “woe is me,” but I’m trying to eradicate that as well. I think that with solo stuff it’s more confessional and I’m kind of taking on blame for the way I am. But I think with the Bunnymen, whatever I say, even if it’s exposing my frailties, I do it in a more angst-ridding way.

MR: How does the process work with you guys creatively these days?

IM: I wrote most of this batch on a bass guitar that kind of didn’t need an app. I’ve started playing basslines on solo stuff and on some of The Fountain. I found I was fairly good at it in a hamfisted way. Basically, after finishing Pro Patria Mori in my flat–it’s a massive flat–in my superflat, which doesn’t mean I’m a mansion-owning Scouser, it’s just bigger than normal, but I’ve managed to turn it into a very… it’s not a hovel, but it’s lived in, if you know what I mean–but the only instrument in the building was a child’s piano with preset drumbeats, which I am going to master for the next album. It’s got about twelve white keys and seven of the black ones. I might write a symphony on it, or whatever Beethoven wrote, I’ll write a few of them. So the only other instrument was a bass guitar, a fairly crap one, a Stagg, it’s called, which is hardly Gibson. But it was the only instrument there, so I started playing that. It was the day after I finished Pro Patria Mori, which had taken so much out of me that I hadn’t even played. So I just started playing basslines, I didn’t know what they were for particularly but they just sounded different. I’d gotten used to [white bottle? 7:16] in that total way that can be brilliant but can also limit where you go. For every C there’s an A minor, for every A minor there’s an F and then a G. I suppose I wanted to break free of that a little bit, but also it was just because I picked up this thing and thought, “Bloody hell, these sound good. They’re cyclical basslines that kind of reminded me of early Bunnymen. I found I was playing in a different key, I got into writing songs in C, which seemed to suit the song but I want to sing the high stuff, and I found that writing things in C make it difficult to go up the octave in the way I can and historically get to do. But by playing these riffs with the open D-string, or playing the twiddly stuff on the G-string. I found that it gave me the octave thing I can do. A lot of people think it’s a hard excuse if it’s up in C, but all of the songs like “The Cutter,” “The Back Of Love,” a lot of those songs were written in D, so it enabled me to use the low voice and the open octave and even the very high falsetto stuff for backing vocals. So I was like, “Wow, this stuff sounds great,” and thne I did early demos of it, added some guitars, spiky, choppy stuff that I used to do early Bunnymen. I was like, “Wow, this sounds like the Bunnymen but now.” Then Youth got involved producing, and we added them to the demos and worked with a few things. They just brought this sound to it, using strings like spiky “Eh-eh-eh-eh,” which again was like the early stuff, it was related to it, but it was the in-laws rather than direct family, if you know what I mean. I went through maybe eighteen months or two years of melancholy depression depression, which I’ve gone to in the past, but it always came in waves, even as a kid, I knew it would come but the wave wouldn’t last that long. I actually enjoyed the waves of melancholy.

MR: What are some things that have happened that have been very significant to you as a professional musician over the years?

IM: One thing is that these waves kind of became tsunamis and I didn’t know when they were going to stop raging, I can’t even snap out of them sometimes. They’re very good for writing songs and stuff, especially the lyrical side, they’re really good for that. My wife used to say, “You do this on purpose, you get into this kind of down thing so you can write songs,” which I used to kind of half admit that was true. But I always seemed to be able to, if not console them, at least ride them. Then over the last few years I had some personal things I won’t go into, but I suppose trying to change your life by facing the waves and trying to prevent them going so long, I’m doing something about them, which could involve loads of things. Accepting that maybe it was more of a problem than something I could just say was part of my personality, no one wants to feel shite for more than a year non-stop. But I think without that I don’t think I would’ve come up with songs like “Meteorites” and “Is This A Breakdown?” So I knew I had to use the way I was feeling, that’s one aspect, and also feeling that a statement had to be made almost with this album, no jokes, no fluffy songs that didn’t really stack up, songs that I wanted people to hear. There were no “half-baked” things going on, I wanted to make sure every breath, every word, every letter counted.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

IM: Every now and then, I bump into people who I like. Glasvegas was one, I said to James [Allan], “Whatever you do, don’t wear white and don’t look like a geisha girl with your next record,” and guess what? He wore white with a little geisha parasol. I also said, “don’t ever go up your own ass and certainly not anyone else’s.” Unfortunately they have a Support Tour with U2 and there’s no margin when you do that. And Jake Bugg is someone I know, we met somewhere in London recently. I think Jake Bugg is fantastic, especially when he does the ballad-y kind of stuff, the slower, less skiffle-y Dylan stuff, which I like as well, but when he writes one of them beautiful ballads they’re kind of beyond his years in a way. I just think he’s great. I told him, “You seem as cool as you get, don’t listen to anyone’s advice apart of mine and don’t go up your own ass or anyone else’s.” That’s the advice I give. If you stick to that, hopefully you’ll still write the great melodies, but even if you don’t you can say to yourself, “I didn’t go up anyone’s ass.” That’s a great rule to live by I think, otherwise you’ve let yourself down. You’ve got to be strong enough to know when you’re good and when you’re brilliant. Jake Bugg is kind of knowing that. It’s going to be tough because he’s a solo act, leading a band. It’s hard when it’s your name and you can’t share that weight of your own sense of who you are. You can share that in a band because it then becomes… The Bunnymen, we know, there was always a underlined, shared knowledge of what we were and it can be defined by what you don’t do. There would be times you can’t possibly do that because it wouldn’t feel right, you know sometimes you can get manipulated, but we were always the vocal bastards of that kind of scene and music. “We don’t do cowboy hats, we don’t do religion, and we don’t do arse licking, never mind arse fucking buttholing.”

MR: Well, I think that answered all of my questions. It’s been an honor talking to you.

IM: Wait, Mike, one question from me. What did you think of the album?

MR: Well, I think it might be my favorite from you guys in a long time. Hope that doesn’t hurt your feelings.

IM: It’s the best insult, you know?

MR: I think so. I’m just hesitant to commit because I need it to be part of my life a little longer.

IM: I agree. At the time, Ocean Rain was a classic but it certainly drones, and this is only fresh off the mixing desk and it already feels like a weighty album.

MR: Also, I think the depth of it reaches further than the others.

IM: Yeah, I agree.

MR: How do you feel about the influence you’re leaving? Echo & The Bunnymen has affected so many bands.

IM: It’s funny because a lot of it I wish I hadn’t influenced because there’s so much shite out there. Hopefully, I’ve influenced people to pout more when they’ve got a pair of lips. I do like the early stuff of Coldplay, the fact that Chris was open about how much we’d influenced him and his band. I think if we helped influence songs like “In My Place” or “Fix You,” then brilliant. I think we had more influence on American bands to be honest, or at least there were more American bands saying how much they loved us, like Pavement, or even the Pixies, at least when I’ve spoken to them they’ve said we were a massive influence. The Flaming Lips, a band I really like, Arcade Fire said we influenced them. I think they’re a great band, to be honest. So yeah, it’s great when you like the actual stuff you’ve influenced. With Arcade Fire I find myself thinking, “God, I wish we sounded like that.” People will say they sound like us. But yeah, I think this album will make people sit up. People like Chris Martin will envy being able to write a song like me. No one can get near that kind of stuff. The race is back on.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with LP

Mike Ragogna: LP, you just released your first full length album, Forever For Now. This is technically your debut album, isn’t it?

LP: Yeah, it’s my major label debut for sure. While it’s great to have an EP and all the stuff that goes with it, as well as the [Citibank] commercial with the song got that me touring a bunch, it definitely set me back making that record. And it’s hard to explain to people; people see no record as non-movement, you know? But there was a lot of movement. You feel like you’re making excuses sometimes, and you’re not, it’s just a process you have to get through. We really spent a lot of time on this record.

MR: Did you spend a lot of time on it also because you were in that mind of it being an introduction of LP, on an LP?

LP: [laughs] Somewhat, yes. You always feel like you want to make it perfect, but I think we also felt like there were different directions we could go, and we just started building it, like putting orchestras on it. It got pretty large. I guess we wanted to make it perfect, to pick the right songs and to complement my voice enough. We put a couple of them on there that were on the EP, as we always intended to. I was touring for a year for “Into the Wild,” and that set us back about a year from recording, and I started writing more songs.

MR: Did you have a goal for this album when you started out? What kind of journey did you take with it, in your opinion?

LP: I wanted the record to certainly have peaks and valleys; a landscape. I didn’t want it to be all the same song. We start really high with “Heavenly Light.” That’s an interesting choice for the opener, and I feel like that song kind of sets you up for the rest of the record, it pumps you up on a high note, then you can receive the rest. So when “Forever For Now” hits you, it’s almost like a lullaby. We go from sunrise to sunset, basically. The thing about “Into The Wild,” is that, while it was a commercial in the US, but I would say that ninety percent of the world has not heard that song. There are so many people that haven’t heard it, like in Europe, for example; that wasn’t a commercial in Europe, so people don’t know it. So I feel like if no one had heard “Into The Wild,” that that would have been the first single. And in a way it was; it was a bit of a setup for the record. That song has a lot of life left in it. I feel like “Into The Wild” and “Tokyo Sunrise” both deserve to be on an actual studio record. The EP was kind of like a teaser, and I really wanted a couple of those songs to be the studio record. Especially “Tokyo Sunrise.”

MR: You did two hundred and fifty shows a year, basically living out of a tiny van. I guess you could call those “Salad days.” What are the major differences for you now versus then?

LP: My days are slightly more structured now, which I think every artist really begs for and wants in their early years. That’s what getting more attention or being more popular gives you. It gives you more of a structure, and there are more things to do that you need to do like, for instance, this interview. Touring and shows are the life’s blood for most musicians I know. It’s the ultimate connection. You go from writing a song in a small room, to playing a song in a bigger venue to people, and that’s the journey and that’s the best part of getting yourself out there.

MR: How is your partnership with [Rob] Cavallo doing these days?

LP: It’s great. We became great friends during the making of this record. He’s a brilliant producer. He knows so much about music and about sound. He’s one of the very few producers that can do the old-school stuff and also understand Pro Tools and all that. It’s interesting to work with a master of sorts. I feel like there’s not that many of them out there, and he’s sonically brilliant.

MR: Were you tempted to re-record your hits with Rihanna and Christina Aguilera, “Cheers (Drink to That)” and “Beautiful People” for this project?

LP: No, not at all. Not even a little. They’re great, but one of the biggest things I discovered during the making of this record the last couple of years has been the difference between songs for me, and songs for other people. I can notice it in a heartbeat now. In fact, upon writing “Into The Wild,” “Someday” and “Wasted Love,” I really feel that no one but I can sing those songs. Like “Tokyo Sunrise” is one of those songs that I know is mine.

MR: When you did the first playback of that album, were there any surprises about yourself or any of the songs?

LP: I was kind of surprised where a couple of the songs took me. We went a little pop on some songs, which is probably my songwriting for other people creeping in a little bit, but that’s just part of who I am. I have a couple of different things in me insofar as how I write and what I like to hear. But when you have a record, it’s a lot of listening to the same songs, so it’s difficult to keep perspective. But if I remember correctly, when I hadn’t quite lost my perspective with this record after hearing it over and over, it packed a good wallop.

MR: Are there any songs in particular where you felt like, “Wow, I really discovered something about myself”?

LP: Yeah, “Tokyo” for sure is the apex for me in this record. I loved writing it and I loved singing it. It’s got a bit of a Fleetwood Mac vibe, which was a surprise, and was something I didn’t intend to do.

MR: Are there any songs on there which might be the closest or most personal to you?

LP: “Tokyo” and “Forever For Now” are very deep for me. I’m close with all of them, and “Into The Wild” for sure; I feel like I’ve got almost every part of my voice that I would want people to hear first. If I was trying to get people to know what I sounded like, I would play them that or “Tokyo.”

MR: Having just put out a project of twelve songs and bonus tracks, is there some kind of almost post-partum-like letdown that you feel?

LP: Absolutely. My friends can sense a kind of malaise, and I think it’s just what you go through right before a record comes out, because there’s no more talking about it. You get signed, there’s all this promise; you write songs, there’s all this promise; you record, there’s all this promise, promise, promise. And then you have this thing and it’s getting printed thousands of times on vinyl and CDs and now there’s no going back. You’re going to present this thing, and that’s it. It’s kind of like your kid going off to college, you know, you’ve done everything you can.

MR: In the same sense, parents sometime think, “Oh, maybe if I’d done this or that…” Chances are, every artist probably approaches their work and thinks, “Okay, it’s sort of finished…”

LP: Oh yeah, I feel like that. There are some things that I might change, but they’re there now, and I’m proud of this record. Records are good for showing where you were at a certain time, and I think this definitely shows that.

MR: Does it feel at all like the record is the skeleton and you’re going to “flesh it out” more with the live shows, etc.?

LP: Definitely. What’s interesting is that I haven’t really played a whole bunch of shows, especially the actual touring in clubs, which is when you really flesh out and kind of take on a new life, so to speak. That part’s exciting to think about; playing songs for people and seeing their responses makes you fall in love with the record again.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

LP: Write songs, and keep writing. Even if you think you wrote the best song you’ve ever written, keep writing. My record’s not even out yet, and I’ve started writing for myself again. You can’t go too long patting yourself on the back even if you wrote the greatest record ever. Radiohead didn’t just stand there and applaud themselves forever after they wrote The Bends. They kept writing and changing and I think that’s what you have to do regardless of what stage you’re at. So for new artists it’s really important to keep going and producing songs and trying them out on people. And play live, and get better at connecting with and playing for people, because people really notice it when you can perform well, and it helps a lot.

MR: Nice. You could easily slip into the role of mentor.

LP: Well, I do it naturally with my friends who are starting or trying to do stuff, so I’m sure when the opportunity arises, I do take it and will take it.

MR: So you’re not doing two hundred and fifty days a year anymore, but I imagine with the new album out, you’ll be supporting it with a tour?

LP: Definitely, that’s a major thing, and I’m very much looking forward to it. One of the things I do best as far as this whole thing goes is performing the songs. That’s the ultimate payoff for me. I feel my best when I can take it all the way there. It’s a really good feeling to write a song and then perform it, and I think a lot of performers would agree.

MR: Beautiful. What advice do you have for yourself at this point?

LP: I’d say don’t get too ahead of myself, and try to keep my expectations low and my work ethic high. That’s easy to say, but you start to get expectations, especially when good things happen and you think, “Oh, well maybe it could go this way.” I just want to enjoy what’s happening and be present and not get too ahead of myself. I hate anytime I get offstage and feel like I didn’t really “absorb” that experience. That’s my main goal, to absorb what’s happening around me as it’s happening.

MR: You’re absorbing a lot right now, aren’t you.

LP: Yeah, it’s good though. I just try to keep calm and get a little Buddhist about it, not too high or too low.

MR: You must be so stoked about this album, though.

LP: I am, and I look forward to people hearing it. It’s definitely a whole piece, which was the goal. Something you could play start to finish that all sounds good together.

MR: You’re awesome and I really appreciate your time. Hopefully the next time we talk, you’re a household name.

LP: Thanks, Mike. I really appreciate it, you’re so sweet. Talk soon!

Transcribed by Emily Fotis

2014-06-03-HarryDeanStantonJune3.jpg

A Conversation with Harry Dean Stanton

Mike Ragogna: How fictional is Partly Fiction?

Harry Dean Stanton: It’s all fiction. It’s all a dream. Life is all a dream.

MR: How did the project begin?

HDS: It started with Sophie [Huber], we used to go out a long time ago. She was the whole thing.

MR: She directed the documentary.

HDS: Yeah.

MR: The documentary has been screened at over fifty festivals in the US and internationally. How do you think it went over?

HDS: I’ve been getting a good response from all over.

MR: You have a lot of well-known songs on here, many of them are almost classics. David Lynch is quoted as saying he loves your version of “Everybody’s Talkin’.”

HDS: Yeah, that’s a heroin song. It was written on heroin. Fred Neil and Lou [Casteou?] was an actor, they were friends, I think they were both on heroin when they got the idea. Harry Nilsson made a hit out of it, but he made a rock ‘n’ roll song, which is not a heroin song.

MR: The essence of it is in how you did it, right?

HDS: Yeah.

MR: You recorded “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain,” which, when it’s sung by you, takes on a different kind of feel.

HDS: Yeah, that’s a good song. All the songs are well-written. That was a quote about the album, the writing of the songs let the songs sell themselves.

MR: They’re like self-reflections?

HDS: They’re all well-written.

MR: What did you relate to in each of the songs? That they were well-written or that they related to your life in some way?

HDS: “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain” was related to Rebecca De Mornay, I used to go out with her, she loved the song.

MR: So a lot of these are very personal, with your memories relating to the music.

HDS: They’re songs I’ve heard over the years that resonated with me.

MR: You also recorded “Canción Mixteca” with Ry Cooder.

HDS: Yeah, that was on a soundtrack album, it was the theme song in Paris, Texas.

MR: Did it feel good recording it again for that project? Did it take you back?

HDS: Oh yeah, I love it, it’s a beautiful song.

MR: You do a couple of traditionals as well, for instance, “Danny Boy.”

HDS: That was actually written by an Englishman I think, but it has close Irish ties. It’s kind of the Irish national anthem. For years, I thought it was a mother singing to her son, “Danny Boy,” but it was a father who had lost two sons in two wars and this was his youngest son going into World War One. That’s what the song’s about.

MR: You have an interesting convergence of being an actor and being a musician. Do those two arts compliment each other? Like when you’re singing a song, do you think your acting abilities let you pull out the more emotionally significant lines, etc.?

HDS: Oh yeah, there’s no difference really. If you’re a good singer, you can be an actor. As a matter of fact, anybody can be a film actor. A man off the street can be a film actor if he’s got a good director.

MR: But certainly that’s not how you feel about your own career, right? You feel like you’re a good actor, no?

HDS: Oh yeah.

MR: But there are degrees of being able to interpret a script, I’m sure your musical interpretation gives you little more skill at acting.

HDS: Anybody can relate to any part that’s written, a murderer, a lover, an authority figure, it doesn’t matter, they’re all universal.

MR: The documentary has some of your friends as guests, Sam Shepard, Wim Wenders, Deborah Harry, and Kris Kristofferson. When you hear them talk about their interaction with you and what you mean to them, what do you think at this point? How does it affect you?

HDS: It’s a nice feeling. I like all of those people. What else can I say?

MR: Does it touch you on a deeper level because of the personal friendships and relationships you have with them?

HDS: Oh yeah, we’re all close friends.

MR: You’re accompanied by Jamie James and Don Was, what do you think of how the album turned out as far as musicianship?

HDS: I think it’s all good. I haven’t heard the album yet but I think I saw one cut of the film. They’re all great people, talented musicians, I’m very fortunate.

MR: Were there any roles that were particularly special to you?

HDS: Oh yeah, Paris, Texas is my favorite movie. All of them had something going on, all of them appealed to me.

MR: Sophie is very up front about her friendship with you, how you met in the nineties and have been friends ever since. She’s the one who came up with the idea to make this, but when you were recording the songs for this, did she have the idea of how this was going to turn out ultimately?

HDS: It all just developed and unfolded naturally.

MR: Were there any surprises for you in the documentary?

HDS: I can’t remember anything at the moment.

MR: That’s okay. Are there any songs on Partly Fiction that really, really resonate with you?

HDS: They all do. “Danny Boy,” “Canción Mixteca,” all of them do.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

HDS: Don’t try. Let it happen.

MR: And that’s how it happened with you?

HDS: Yeah, just let it happen. Everything unfolds, I had nothing to do with it.

MR: How did you get into music initially?

HDS: I don’t know, I was just born with a good ear. I was singing when I was six years old. When nobody was home, I would get up on a stool and sing. I was in love with an eighteen year-old house sitter. Her name was Thelma. I’d get up and sing. Who wrote that song? Early country western writers, “The Singing Brakeman” they called him. It was the first song I ever remember, “T For Texas.”

MR: Jimmie Rodgers, and he was an inspiration for you as a kid?

HDS: Yes, that was the first song I remember.

MR: Were you encouraged by your family to do more music?

HDS: My mother sang, she taught me some Irish songs. My mother was Irish. I sang with my brothers, we had a barbershop quartet. The three of us, and I forget who the fourth one was. In high school and college I always sang in glee clubs and barbershop quartets.

MR: Do you remember any of the songs?

HDS: Let’s see, there was a famous organization called Yhe Barbershop Singers of America, “Those good old songs for me, I love to hear those minor chords and four-part harmony.”

MR: What advice do you have for actors?

HDS: Play yourself. That’s what I do.

MR: Similar advice to the musicians.

HDS: Yeah.

MR: You’ve taken roles you’ve wanted to play and related to the parts, right?

HDS: I’ve made some good choices.

MR: What are some choices coming up after Partly Fiction is a hit?

HDS: I haven’t a clue.

MR: What do you want to do?

HDS: I can’t answer that, I have to wait and see what I do. The best approach was Jack Nicholson, I did Ride In The Whirlwind with him, you know that film? He called me and said, “I’ve got a part for you, but I don’t want you to do anything. Let the wardrobe do the character.” I’d been thinking along those lines anyway, so that solidified my whole approach to acting. I played myself and let the wardrobe do the character.

MR: And that’s exactly what you said toward the beginning of this interview, you just let things unfold.

HDS: Yeah, it’s a whole eastern approach. Taoism, Buddhism, and the real Jewish Kabbalah, not the organized one. Most Jews don’t get it and most Christians don’t get it either. The real Kabbalah is the same as Buddhim and Taoism.

MR: Are you pretty spiritual?

HDS: Spiritual, yeah, but I don’t believe in any religions. Not even the eastern ones. Once they’re organized, it’s all over.

MR: Do you think spirituality is at the bottom of your art? Do you think it’s what your creative juices come from?

HDS: Again, there’s no real answer to that. Everything unfolds naturally. Ultimately there’s no answer to the whole existence on the planet, really, there’s no answer to it. Nobody’s in charge. It all just happens.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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