Terrifying Tales – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - Terrifying Tales  artwork

Terrifying Tales

Tell Tale Heart; The Cask of the Amontillado; The Masque of the Red Death; The Fall of the House of Usher; The Murders in the Rue Morgue; The Purloined Letter; The Pit and the Pendulum

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Classics

Price: $ 0.99

Publish Date: December 16, 2014

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Seller: SIMON AND SCHUSTER DIGITAL SALES INC


The melancholy, brilliance, passionate lyricism, and torment of Edgar Allen Poe are all well represented in this collection. Here, in one volume, are his masterpieces of mystery, terror, humor, and adventure, including stories such as The Tell-Tale Heart , The Cask of Amontillado , The Black Cat , The Masque of the Red Death , The Murders in the Rue Morgue , and The Pit and the Pendulum , to name just a few, that defined American romanticism and secured Poe as one of the most enduring literary voices of the nineteenth century.

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The Tell Tale Heart, starring Boris Karloff (Unabridged) – Edgar Allan Poe

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The Tell Tale Heart, starring Boris Karloff (Unabridged)

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 2, 2009

© ℗ © 2009 Renaissance E Books, Inc.

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The People of the River – Edgar Wallace

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The People of the River

Edgar Wallace

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 0.99

Publish Date: July 1, 2014

Publisher: MysteriousPress.com/Open Road

Seller: OpenRoad Integrated Media, LLC


The second installment in the enthralling exploits of Commissioner Sanders, Great Britain’s man in colonial Africa Commissioner Sanders should have known better than to go on vacation. He is just a few days from his offices in British West Africa when he receives word from his second in command that trouble, always at a simmer in this jungle outpost, is about to come to a boil. He rushes home, arriving just in time for a meeting of the chiefs of his territory, who have been misled by an ambitious agitator named Bosambo into thinking that Sanders is dead. Sanders’s return staves off rebellion, but Bosambo’s power grab is not over yet. To keep the province from erupting into all-out tribal warfare, Sanders must outsmart the most brilliant chieftain in Africa.   In these rip-roaring adventures, the heroic commissioner contends with malaria, ju-ju, and the whims of government officials safely ensconced in their London offices. The People of the River is both a good-natured thrill ride and a fascinating historical document.   This ebook features a new introduction by Otto Penzler and has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices. 

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The World’s End – Edgar Wright

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The World’s End

Edgar Wright

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: August 23, 2013


Simon Pegg and Nick Frost reteam with director Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz) in this wildly entertaining thrill ride that critics call “funny as hell” (Richard Roeper, WLS-AM Chicago) and “sheer comic perfection” (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone). Twenty years after their first epic pub crawl attempt, the “five musketeers” reunite in their home town to complete the ultimate challenge – one night, five friends, twelve bars – a boozy quest on which only the strongest will survive. But after a bizarre series of encounters with the out-of-this-world locals, they soon realize that reaching their final pub, The World’s End, may be the least of their troubles. They’re having the time of their lives, ready to take on the world…but tonight they may have to save it.

© © 2013 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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The Black Cat (1934) – Edgar G. Ulmer

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The Black Cat (1934)

Edgar G. Ulmer

Genre: Horror

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: May 19, 1934


Horror icons Boris Karloff (Frankenstein) and Bela Lugosi (Dracula) star in the shocking classic The Black Cat based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. After a bus crash on a lonely Austrian road, American honeymooners Joan (Julie Bishop) and Peter Allison (David Manners) are forced to spend the night at the house of Poelzig (Karloff), a sinister looking man who is engaged in an intense feud with Dr. Werdegast (Lugosi), whom the couple met on the Orient Express. Held captive in the mausoleum against their will, they soon discover that Poelzig is the high priest at Black Mass and has chosen Joan to be the Devil’s bride. The couple is then faced with trying to escape the unspeakable treachery culminating in an unforgettable climax to this horror classic.

© © 1934 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 6 (30 short stories) – E. F. Benson, W. F. Harvey, Bram Stoker, Walter Scott, Elizabeth Gaskell, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Rudyard Kipling, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, John Buchan, A. M. Burrage, Walter de La Mare, H. G. Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson, Cynthia Asquith, Lord Dunsany, Clark Ashton Smith, Margaret Ronan, Amelia B. Edwards, Robert Hichens, H. Russell Wakefield, Arthur Quiller-Couch, William Hope Hodgson, L. P. Hartley, Vincent O’Sullivan, Vernon Lee & Paul Spencer

E. F. Benson, W. F. Harvey, Bram Stoker, Walter Scott, Elizabeth Gaskell, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Rudyard Kipling, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, John Buchan, A. M. Burrage, Walter de La Mare, H. G. Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson, Cynthia Asquith, Lord Dunsany, Clark Ashton Smith, Margaret Ronan, Amelia B. Edwards, Robert Hichens, H. Russell Wakefield, Arthur Quiller-Couch, William Hope Hodgson, L. P. Hartley, Vincent O'Sullivan, Vernon Lee & Paul Spencer - The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 6 (30 short stories)  artwork

The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 6 (30 short stories)

E. F. Benson, W. F. Harvey, Bram Stoker, Walter Scott, Elizabeth Gaskell, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Rudyard Kipling, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, John Buchan, A. M. Burrage, Walter de La Mare, H. G. Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson, Cynthia Asquith, Lord Dunsany, Clark Ashton Smith, Margaret Ronan, Amelia B. Edwards, Robert Hichens, H. Russell Wakefield, Arthur Quiller-Couch, William Hope Hodgson, L. P. Hartley, Vincent O’Sullivan, Vernon Lee & Paul Spencer

Genre: Graphic Novels

Publish Date: February 11, 2018

Publisher: Pandora’s Box

Seller: De Marque, Inc.


If you were looking for the Holy Bible of the horror anthologies, consider yourself lucky, because you just found it! Cosmic horror, supernatural events, ghost stories, weird fiction, mystical fantasies, occult narratives, this book plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities. This sixth volume of “The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written” features 30 stories by an all-star cast, including Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert Louis Stevenson, M. R. James, H. P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Machen, Bram Stoker, E. F. Benson, H. G. Wells, William Hope Hodgson, Elizabeth Gaskell and John Buchan, among many others!

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Scott Pilgrim vs. The World – Edgar Wright

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Scott Pilgrim vs. The World

Edgar Wright

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: August 13, 2010


Game on! Scott Pilgrim just met the girl of his dreams…literally. But in order for them to date, he must defeat her seven evil exes — a rogues' gallery — including an infamous skateboarder, a vegan rock star and fearsome identical twins! From the genre-smashing director of Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead comes “a true original” (Entertainment Weekly) powered up by wit, action and groundbreaking visuals that you will want to watch again as soon as it’s over!

© © 2010 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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50 Masterpieces you have to read before you die vol: 2 – Upton Sinclair, W. Somerset Maugham, Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Mann, Rebecca West, H. G. Wellls, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, Mark Twain, Leo Tolstoy, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, H. P. Lovecraft, Rabindranath Tagore, Herman Melville, Jules Verne, Edgar Allan Poe, D. H. Lawrence, Bram Stoker, Sir Walter Scott & Jack London

Upton Sinclair, W. Somerset Maugham, Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Mann, Rebecca West, H. G. Wellls, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, Mark Twain, Leo Tolstoy, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, H. P. Lovecraft, Rabindranath Tagore, Herman Melville, Jules Verne, Edgar Allan Poe, D. H. Lawrence, Bram Stoker, Sir Walter Scott & Jack London - 50 Masterpieces you have to read before you die vol: 2  artwork

50 Masterpieces you have to read before you die vol: 2

Upton Sinclair, W. Somerset Maugham, Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Mann, Rebecca West, H. G. Wellls, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, Mark Twain, Leo Tolstoy, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, H. P. Lovecraft, Rabindranath Tagore, Herman Melville, Jules Verne, Edgar Allan Poe, D. H. Lawrence, Bram Stoker, Sir Walter Scott & Jack London

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: October 11, 2017

Publisher: 4Books

Seller: StreetLib Srl


This book contains several HTML tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. This 2nd volume contains the following 50 works, arranged alphabetically by authors’ last names: Jerome, Jerome K.: Three Men in a Boat Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Joyce, James: Ulysses Kingsley, Charles: The Water-Babies Kipling, Rudyard: Kim La Fayette, Madame de: The Princess of Clèves Laclos, Pierre Choderlos de: Dangerous Liaisons Lawrence, D. H.: Sons and Lovers Lawrence, D. H.: The Rainbow Le Fanu, Sheridan: In a Glass Darkly Lewis, Matthew Gregory: The Monk Lewis, Sinclair: Main Street London, Jack: The Call of the Wild Lovecraft, H.P.: At the Mountains of Madness Mann, Thomas: Royal Highness Maugham, William Somerset: Of Human Bondage Maupassant, Guy de: Bel-Ami Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick Poe, Edgar Allan: The Fall of the House of Usher Proust, Marcel: Swann's Way Radcliffe, Ann: The Mysteries of Udolpho Richardson, Samuel: Clarissa Sand, George: The Devil’s Pool Scott, Walter: Ivanhoe Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein Sienkiewicz, Henryk: Quo Vadis Sinclair, May: Life and Death of Harriett Frean Sinclair, Upton: The Jungle Stendhal: The Red and the Black Stendhal: The Chartreuse of Parma Sterne, Laurence: Tristram Shandy Stevenson, Robert Louis: Treasure Island Stoker, Bram: Dracula Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom’s Cabin Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels Tagore, Rabindranath: The Home and the World Thackeray, William Makepeace: Vanity Fair Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace Tolstoy, Leo: Anna Karenina Trollope, Anthony: The Way We Live Now Turgenev, Ivan: Fathers and Sons Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Verne, Jules: Journey to the Center of the Earth Wallace, Lew: Ben-Hur Wells, H. G.: The Time Machine West, Rebecca: The Return of the Soldier Wharton, Edith: The Age of Innocence Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray Xueqin, Cao: The Dream of the Red Chamber Zola, Émile: Germinal

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The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 3 (30 short stories) – E. F. Benson, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, A. M. Burrage, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Lafcadio Hearn, M. R. James, J. Sheridan Le Fanu, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Vincent O’Sullivan, Mark Twain, Saki, W. F. Harvey, Violet Hunt, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Irvin S. Cobb, O. Henry, Marjorie Bowen, Edith Nesbit & Barry Pain

E. F. Benson, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, A. M. Burrage, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Lafcadio Hearn, M. R. James, J. Sheridan Le Fanu, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Vincent O'Sullivan, Mark Twain, Saki, W. F. Harvey, Violet Hunt, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Irvin S. Cobb, O. Henry, Marjorie Bowen, Edith Nesbit & Barry Pain - The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 3 (30 short stories)  artwork

The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 3 (30 short stories)

E. F. Benson, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, A. M. Burrage, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Lafcadio Hearn, M. R. James, J. Sheridan Le Fanu, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Vincent O’Sullivan, Mark Twain, Saki, W. F. Harvey, Violet Hunt, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Irvin S. Cobb, O. Henry, Marjorie Bowen, Edith Nesbit & Barry Pain

Genre: Graphic Novels

Publish Date: November 28, 2017

Publisher: Pandora’s Box

Seller: De Marque


If you were looking for the Holy Bible of the horror anthologies, consider yourself lucky, because you just found it! Cosmic horror, supernatural events, ghost stories, weird fiction, mystical fantasies, occult narratives, this book plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities. This third volume of “The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written” features 30 stories by an all-star cast, including Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, M. R. James, H. P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, W. F. Harvey, Sheridan Le Fanu, E. T. A. Hoffmann, O. Henry, Edith Nesbit, Charles Dickens, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and A. M. Burrage, among many others!

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50 Masterpieces you have to read before you die – Volume 1 (Beelzebub Classics) – Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Aldous Huxley, Jane Austen, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, E. E. Cummings, Alexandre Dumas, Joseph Conrad, Lewis Carroll, Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, Jack London, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Victor Hugo & E. M. Forster

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Aldous Huxley, Jane Austen, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, E. E. Cummings, Alexandre Dumas, Joseph Conrad, Lewis Carroll, Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, Jack London, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Victor Hugo & E. M. Forster - 50 Masterpieces you have to read before you die - Volume 1 (Beelzebub Classics)  artwork

50 Masterpieces you have to read before you die – Volume 1 (Beelzebub Classics)

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Aldous Huxley, Jane Austen, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, E. E. Cummings, Alexandre Dumas, Joseph Conrad, Lewis Carroll, Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, Jack London, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Victor Hugo & E. M. Forster

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: October 11, 2017

Publisher: 4Books

Seller: StreetLib Srl


This book contains now several HTML tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. This 1st volume contains the following 50 works, arranged alphabetically by authors’ last names: Alcott, Louisa May: Little Women Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice Austen, Jane: Emma Balzac, Honoré de: Father Goriot Barbusse, Henri: The Inferno Brontë, Anne: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights Burroughs, Edgar Rice: Tarzan of the Apes Butler, Samuel: The Way of All Flesh Carroll, Lewis: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Cather, Willa: My Ántonia Cervantes, Miguel de: Don Quixote Chopin, Kate: The Awakening Cleland, John: Fanny Hill Collins, Wilkie: The Moonstone Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness Conrad, Joseph: Nostromo Cooper, James Fenimore: The Last of the Mohicans Crane, Stephen: The Red Badge of Courage Cummings, E. E.: The Enormous Room Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe Defoe, Daniel: Moll Flanders Dickens, Charles: Bleak House Dickens, Charles: Great Expectations Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: Crime and Punishment Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: The Idiot Doyle, Arthur Conan: The Hound of the Baskervilles Dreiser, Theodore: Sister Carrie Dumas, Alexandre: The Three Musketeers Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo Eliot, George: Middlemarch Fielding, Henry: Tom Jones Flaubert, Gustave: Madame Bovary Flaubert, Gustave: Sentimental Education Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier Forster, E. M.: A Room With a View Forster, E. M.: Howards End Gaskell, Elizabeth: North and South Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von: The Sorrows of Young Werther Gogol, Nikolai: Dead Souls Gorky, Maxim: The Mother Haggard, H. Rider: King Solomon’s Mines Hardy, Thomas: Tess of the D’Urbervilles Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter Homer: The Odyssey Hugo, Victor: The Hunchback of Notre Dame Hugo, Victor: Les Misérables Huxley, Aldous: Crome Yellow James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady

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Bach Trios – Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer

Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer - Bach Trios  artwork

Bach Trios

Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: April 7, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Sound Postings, LLC, under license to Nonesuch Records Inc.

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The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 2 (30 short stories) – M. R. James, E. F. Benson, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, Walter de La Mare, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Margaret Oliphant, A. M. Burrage, Vernon Lee, John Metcalfe, Vincent O’Sullivan, Clark Ashton Smith, Arthur Machen, Marjorie Bowen, Rudyard Kipling, Guy de Maupassant, Aleister Crowley, Perceval Landon & William Hope Hodgson

M. R. James, E. F. Benson, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, Walter de La Mare, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Margaret Oliphant, A. M. Burrage, Vernon Lee, John Metcalfe, Vincent O'Sullivan, Clark Ashton Smith, Arthur Machen, Marjorie Bowen, Rudyard Kipling, Guy de Maupassant, Aleister Crowley, Perceval Landon & William Hope Hodgson - The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 2 (30 short stories)  artwork

The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 2 (30 short stories)

M. R. James, E. F. Benson, Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, Walter de La Mare, H. P. Lovecraft, EDGAR ALLAN POE, Margaret Oliphant, A. M. Burrage, Vernon Lee, John Metcalfe, Vincent O’Sullivan, Clark Ashton Smith, Arthur Machen, Marjorie Bowen, Rudyard Kipling, Guy de Maupassant, Aleister Crowley, Perceval Landon & William Hope Hodgson

Genre: Graphic Novels

Publish Date: November 27, 2017

Publisher: Pandora’s Box

Seller: De Marque


If you were looking for the Holy Bible of the horror anthologies, consider yourself lucky, because you just found it! Cosmic horror, supernatural events, ghost stories, weird fiction, mystical fantasies, occult narratives, this book plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities. This second volume of “The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written” features 30 stories by an all-star cast, including Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, M. R. James, H. P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Machen, Sheridan Le Fanu, Walter De La Mare, Marjorie Bowen, Vincent O’Sullivan, John Metcalfe, Magaret Oliphant and A. M. Burrage, among many others!

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 1 – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 1  artwork

The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 1

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: December 31, 1848

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


This, the first of 5 volumes containing Poe's works, contains 8 of his short stories as well as reflections, critiques, and eulogies by others.

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 2 – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 2  artwork

The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 2

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: December 31, 1848

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


Monday, January 19, 2009 marked Edgar Allan Poe's 200th birthday. Though these tales need no introduction, the rationale for starting with volume two is threefold: many of the best-loved (and best) tales are included, the vast majority run from 15 to 30 minutes, and the other volumes can then be recorded without repetition, if there is interest in doing so.

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Edgar Allan Poe’s Complete Poetical Works – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - Edgar Allan Poe's Complete Poetical Works  artwork

Edgar Allan Poe’s Complete Poetical Works

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Poetry

Publish Date: October 4, 2010

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


The eerie tales of Edgar Allan Poe remain among the most brilliant, enduring, and influencial works in American literature. But Poe is also the author of some of the most haunting poetry ever written–poems of love, death and loneliness that have lost none of their power to enthrall in this unique Signet Classic edition.

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Baby Driver – Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright - Baby Driver  artwork

Baby Driver

Edgar Wright

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 19.99

Release Date: June 28, 2017


Follows a talented, young getaway driver who relies on the beat of his personal soundtrack to be the best in the game. After being coerced into working for a crime boss, he must face the music when a doomed heist threatens his life, love and freedom.

© © 2017 Big Talk Productions

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Bach Trios – Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer

Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer - Bach Trios  artwork

Bach Trios

Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: April 7, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Sound Postings, LLC, under license to Nonesuch Records Inc.

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México Bárbaro – Laurette Flores, Edgar Nito, Aarón Soto, Isaac Ezban, Lex Ortega, Jorge Michel Grau, Ulises Guzmán & Gigi Saul Guerrero

Laurette Flores, Edgar Nito, Aarón Soto, Isaac Ezban, Lex Ortega, Jorge Michel Grau, Ulises Guzmán & Gigi Saul Guerrero - México Bárbaro  artwork

México Bárbaro

Laurette Flores, Edgar Nito, Aarón Soto, Isaac Ezban, Lex Ortega, Jorge Michel Grau, Ulises Guzmán & Gigi Saul Guerrero

Genre: Horror

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: November 3, 2015


A vanguard of Mexican directors unite to bring tales of the most brutally terrifying Mexican folkore and legends to vividly shocking life. MEXICO BARBARO presents haunting stories that have been woven into the fabric of a nation’s culture, some passed down through the centuries and some new, but all equally frightening. Stories of boogeymen, trolls, ghosts, monsters, Aztec sacrifices, and of course the Day of the Dead all come together in urban and rural settings to create an anthology that is as contemporary as it is traditional and as important as it is horrifying.

© © 2014 Todos los derechos Mexico

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John Carter in ‘a Princess of Mars’: Barsoom Series, Book 1 (Unabridged) – Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs - John Carter in 'a Princess of Mars': Barsoom Series, Book 1 (Unabridged)  artwork

John Carter in ‘a Princess of Mars’: Barsoom Series, Book 1 (Unabridged)

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 9.95

Publish Date: February 10, 2012

© ℗ © 2012 Tantor Audio

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The Fall of the House of Usher – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - The Fall of the House of Usher  artwork

The Fall of the House of Usher

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Horror

Publish Date: January 1, 1839

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


An unnamed protagonist (the Narrator) is summoned to the remote mansion of his boyhood friend, Roderick Usher. Filled with a sense of dread by the sight of the house itself, the Narrator reunites with his old companion, who is suffering from a strange mental illness and whose sister, Madeline is near death due to a mysterious disease. The Narrator provides company to Usher while he paints and plays guitar, spending all his days inside, avoiding the sunlight and obsessing over the sentience of the non-living. When Madeline dies, Usher decides to bury her temporarily in one of his house's large vaults. A few days later, however, she emerges from her provisional tomb, killing her brother while the Narrator flees for his life.

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Cuentos para Ninos – Laura Burrola Fernández, Edgar Pacheco González, Ana L. Pacheco Burrola, Diana A. Pacheco Burrola & Edgar D. Pacheco Burrola

Laura Burrola Fernández, Edgar Pacheco González, Ana L. Pacheco Burrola, Diana A. Pacheco Burrola & Edgar D. Pacheco Burrola - Cuentos para Ninos  artwork

Cuentos para Ninos

La Amistad

Laura Burrola Fernández, Edgar Pacheco González, Ana L. Pacheco Burrola, Diana A. Pacheco Burrola & Edgar D. Pacheco Burrola

Genre: Graphic Novels

Publish Date: February 2, 2012

Publisher: Edgar Pacheco Gonzalez

Seller: Edgar Pacheco Gonzalez


Cuento animado con multimedia para niños que lo pueden disfrutar en compañía de sus padres por las noches antes de irse a la cama, como fomento a la convivencia familiar y practica de la lectura entre padres e hijos.

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The Raven – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - The Raven  artwork

The Raven

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Poetry

Publish Date: January 1, 1845

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


Poet tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk and classical references.

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Hot Fuzz – Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright - Hot Fuzz  artwork

Hot Fuzz

Edgar Wright

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: April 20, 2007


Get ready for a gut-busting, outrageous comedy from the guys that created Shaun of the Dead. Nicholas Angel (Simon Pegg) is a big-city cop who can't be stopped – but he's making everyone else on the force look bad. When he is reassigned to a small, quiet town, he struggles with this new, seemingly idyllic world and his bumbling partner (Nick Frost). But their dull existence is interrupted by several grisly and suspicious accidents, and the crime-fighting duo turn up the heat and hand out high-octane, car-chasing, gun-fighting, big-city justice in this hilarious hit critics are calling "Outrageous! Uproariously Funny!" (Thelma Adams, US Weekly).

© © 2007 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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Heartland: An Appalachian Anthology – Edgar Meyer, Joshua Bell, Mark O’Conner, Mark O’Connor & Yo-Yo Ma

Edgar Meyer, Joshua Bell, Mark O'Conner, Mark O'Connor & Yo-Yo Ma - Heartland: An Appalachian Anthology  artwork

Heartland: An Appalachian Anthology

Edgar Meyer, Joshua Bell, Mark O’Conner, Mark O’Connor & Yo-Yo Ma

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: May 15, 2001

© ℗ 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT

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The Cask of Amontillado – Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe - The Cask of Amontillado  artwork

The Cask of Amontillado

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Horror

Publish Date: January 1, 1846

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


The story is set in a nameless Italian city in an unspecified year and is about the narrator's deadly revenge on a friend who, he believes, has insulted him. The story's narrator, Montresor, tells the story of the day that he took his revenge on Fortunato, a fellow nobleman, to an unspecified person who knows him very well. Angry over some unspecified insult, he plots to murder his friend during Carnival when the man is drunk, dizzy, and wearing a jester's motley.

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The Gods of Mars – Edgar Rice Burroughs

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The Gods of Mars

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Publish Date: January 1, 1913

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


Soldier and adventurer John Carter tells the story of how he returns to the planet Mars to be reunited with his love, the Martian princess Dejah Thoris. With his great friend Tars Tarkas, mighty Jeddak of Thark, Carter sets out in search of his princess. But Dejah Thoris has vanished. And Carter becomes trapped in the legendary Eden of Mars, from which none has ever escaped alive.

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Bass & Mandolin – Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

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Bass & Mandolin

Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 10.99

Release Date: September 9, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Nonesuch Records Inc.

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Appalachia Waltz (Remastered) – Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer & Mark O’Connor

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Appalachia Waltz (Remastered)

Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer & Mark O’Connor

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 16, 1996

© ℗ 1996 Sony Music Entertainment

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Cuentos para Ninos – Laura Burrola Fernández, Edgar Pacheco González, Ana L. Pacheco Burrola, Diana A. Pacheco Burrola & Edgar D. Pacheco Burrola

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Cuentos para Ninos

La Amistad

Laura Burrola Fernández, Edgar Pacheco González, Ana L. Pacheco Burrola, Diana A. Pacheco Burrola & Edgar D. Pacheco Burrola

Genre: Graphic Novels

Publish Date: February 2, 2012

Publisher: Edgar Pacheco Gonzalez

Seller: Edgar Pacheco Gonzalez


Cuento animado con multimedia para niños que lo pueden disfrutar en compañía de sus padres por las noches antes de irse a la cama, como fomento a la convivencia familiar y practica de la lectura entre padres e hijos.

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The Goat Rodeo Sessions (Deluxe Edition) – Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

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The Goat Rodeo Sessions (Deluxe Edition)

Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 14.99

Release Date: October 19, 2012

© ℗ 2011, 2012 Sony Music Entertainment

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A Princess of Mars – Edgar Rice Burroughs

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A Princess of Mars

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Genre: Adventure

Publish Date: June 23, 2008

Publisher: The Project Gutenberg

Seller: Scott Reid


A Princess of Mars (1917) is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first of his Barsoom series. Full of swordplay and daring feats, the novel is considered a classic example of 20th century pulp fiction. It is also a seminal instance of the planetary romance, a sub-genre of science fantasy that became highly popular in the decades following its publication. Its early chapters also contain elements of the Western. The story is set on Mars, imagined as a dying planet with a harsh desert environment. This vision of Mars was based on the work of the astronomer Percival Lowell, whose ideas were widely popularized in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Barsoom series inspired a number of well-known 20th century science fiction writers, including Jack Vance, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein, and John Norman. The series was also inspirational for many scientists in the fields of space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life, including Carl Sagan, who read A Princess of Mars when he was a child.

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Sanders of the River – Edgar Wallace

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Sanders of the River

Edgar Wallace

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 0.99

Publish Date: July 1, 2014

Publisher: MysteriousPress.com/Open Road

Seller: OpenRoad Integrated Media, LLC


Thrilling adventures of colonial Africa from the creator of  King Kong In the jungles of West Africa, Commissioner Sanders is the highest representative of the British crown. The health and safety of a quarter-million natives—who speak countless languages and worship untold gods—are his responsibility. Whether disciplining a boy king, expelling troublesome missionaries, or fighting to contain outbreaks of sleeping sickness and beri-beri, Sanders and his lieutenants must be quick, decisive, and fair. The fate of the empire—not to mention their lives—depends on it.   These rollicking escapades, based on Edgar Wallace’s travels in Africa, offer an entertaining glimpse into a world—and a mindset—long lost but endlessly intriguing.   This ebook features a new introduction by Otto Penzler and has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.  Edgar Wallace (1875–1932) was one of the most popular and prolific authors of his era. His hundred-odd books, including the groundbreaking Four Just Men series and the African adventures of Commissioner Sanders and Lieutenant Bones, have sold over fifty million copies around the world. He is best remembered today for his thrillers and for the original version of King Kong , which was revised and filmed after his death. 

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Scott Pilgrim vs. The World – Edgar Wright

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Scott Pilgrim vs. The World

Edgar Wright

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: August 13, 2010


Game on! Scott Pilgrim just met the girl of his dreams…literally. But in order for them to date, he must defeat her seven evil exes — a rogues' gallery — including an infamous skateboarder, a vegan rock star and fearsome identical twins! From the genre-smashing director of Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead comes “a true original” (Entertainment Weekly) powered up by wit, action and groundbreaking visuals that you will want to watch again as soon as it’s over!

© © 2010 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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The Raven – Edgar Allan Poe

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The Raven

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: August 26, 2013

Publisher: Gallery Books

Seller: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc.


Edgar Allan Poe’s celebrated narrative poem now available as a Simon & Schuster ebook, including an extended excerpt from Mrs. Poe by Lynn Cullen, a vivid and compelling novel about a poet who becomes entangled in an affair with Edgar Allan Poe—at the same time that she becomes the unwilling confidante of his much-younger wife.

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The Goat Rodeo Sessions – Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile - The Goat Rodeo Sessions  artwork

The Goat Rodeo Sessions

Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 10.99

Release Date: October 21, 2011

© ℗ 2011 Sony Music Entertainment

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Warlord of Mars – Edgar Rice Burroughs

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Warlord of Mars

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Publish Date: January 1, 1919

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


Warlord of Mars is a Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the third of his famous Barsoom series. John Carter continues his quest to be reunited with his wife, the princess Dejah Thoris, and discovers more fantastic creatures and ancient mysterious Martian races.

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 2 – Edgar Allan Poe

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 2

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: January 1, 1849

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


Monday, January 19, 2009 marked Edgar Allan Poe's 200th birthday. Though these tales need no introduction, the rationale for starting with volume two is threefold: many of the best-loved (and best) tales are included, the vast majority run from 15 to 30 minutes, and the other volumes can then be recorded without repetition, if there is interest in doing so.

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Appalachian Journey – Alison Krauss, Béla Fleck, Edgar Meyer, James Taylor, Mark O’Connor, Mike Marshall & Yo-Yo Ma

Alison Krauss, Béla Fleck, Edgar Meyer, James Taylor, Mark O'Connor, Mike Marshall & Yo-Yo Ma - Appalachian Journey  artwork

Appalachian Journey

Alison Krauss, Béla Fleck, Edgar Meyer, James Taylor, Mark O’Connor, Mike Marshall & Yo-Yo Ma

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: March 21, 2000

© ℗ 2000 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT

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A Princess of Mars (Unabridged) – Edgar Rice Burroughs

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A Princess of Mars (Unabridged)

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 3.95

Publish Date: March 5, 2012

© ℗ © 2012 B.J. Harrison

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 1 – Edgar Allan Poe

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe – Volume 1

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: January 1, 1849

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


This, the first of 5 volumes containing Poe's works, contains 8 of his short stories as well as reflections, critiques, and eulogies by others.

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Edgar Froese, Leader of Tangerine Dream, Dies at 70

In Tangerine Dream, a band that evolved through many incarnations and spanned decades, Mr. Froese is the musician who stayed the longest.
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Shaun of the Dead – Edgar Wright

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Shaun of the Dead

Edgar Wright

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: September 24, 2004


Get ready for a gut-busting, bone-mashing good time in the hilarious horror comedy, Shaun of the Dead. There comes a day in every man's life when he has to get off the couch… and kill some zombies. When flesh-eating zombies are on the hunt for a bite to eat, it's up to slacker Shaun (Simon Pegg) and his best pal (Nick Frost) to save their friends and family from becoming the next entrée. Satisfy your bloodthirsty appetite with the movie that masters of horror and film critics alike are hailing as the funniest and scariest movie of the year. Novelist Stephen King gushes "it's a 10 on the fun meter and destined to be a cult classic" and Newsweek calls Shaun of the Dead "a bloody hoot!" It's a screamingly hilarious zomedy that will have you dying with laughter.

© © 2004 Focus Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

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The Melody of Rhythm – Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain & Edgar Meyer

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The Melody of Rhythm

Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain & Edgar Meyer

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: July 27, 1998

© ℗ 2009 E1 Music

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The Terrifying Tales by Edgar Allen Poe – Edgar Allan Poe

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The Terrifying Tales by Edgar Allen Poe

Tell Tale Heart; The Cask of the Amontillado; The Masque of the Red Death; The Fall of the House of Usher; The Murders in the Rue Morgue; The Purloined Letter; The Pit and the Pendulum

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: December 16, 2014

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Seller: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc.


The melancholy, brilliance, passionate lyricism, and torment of Edgar Allen Poe are all well represented in this collection. Here, in one volume, are his masterpieces of mystery, terror, humor, and adventure, including stories such as The Tell-Tale Heart , The Cask of Amontillado , The Black Cat , The Masque of the Red Death , The Murders in the Rue Morgue , and The Pit and the Pendulum , to name just a few, that defined American romanticism and secured Poe as one of the most enduring literary voices of the nineteenth century.

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Edgar Allan Poe’s Complete Poetical Works – Edgar Allan Poe

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Edgar Allan Poe’s Complete Poetical Works

Edgar Allan Poe

Genre: Poetry

Publish Date: October 4, 2010

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


The eerie tales of Edgar Allan Poe remain among the most brilliant, enduring, and influencial works in American literature. But Poe is also the author of some of the most haunting poetry ever written–poems of love, death and loneliness that have lost none of their power to enthrall in this unique Signet Classic edition.

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So U and More: Conversations with Neal Schon, Judas Priest’s Rob Halford and Edgar Winter

2014-07-07-NealSchonMay19.jpg

A Conversation with Neal Schon

Mike Ragogna: Neal, what is it creatively that satisfies you, playing solo or with Journey?

Neal Schon: Well, Journey is more about well-crafted songs and well recorded and produced songs, and I think that what I enjoy about my solo songs is that I’m sort of more of a painter with a blank canvas and a bunch of paints and materials to work with and I kind of throw everything on there and see how it lands. It’s more experimental, definitely. In Journey, we do experiment from time to time, usually when we’re all playing in a room, which doesn’t happen a lot. We were fortunate to get together at Fantasy this time. We were there for about three weeks rehearsing and recording and listening back to everything that we were doing. It helped us sort of hone in on our older songs. A lot of times, when you’ve played something for this many years, they drift. Everybody starts playing different things, you get bored, so we pulled everything back and now I think we’re having really great shows because of fine-tuning stuff like that again.

MR: On So U, you recorded with Marco Mendoza, Deen Castronovo and wrote some of the songs with Jack Blades. What was behind the collaborating this time out?

NS: It was mainly a time issue for me. I didn’t have a lot of time in the studio to do this, it was kind of at the last minute. I was just finishing up The Calling record, my solo record before this one. I was in Santa Fe and I was really enjoying myself and I just happened to call Deen and Marco to see if they were off because Marco’s always touring, he’s never around. But he just happened to be around and I said, “Do you guys have like, two or three days available?” and they said, “Yeah.” I was astounded that they were both available at the same time. I said, “Want to come up Santa Fe? We can work on something, I think we can work out a record.” Working with Jack in the past, he’s always very quick and energetic. I always come up with something great with Jack. I figured while we’re writing music and we’re in there kind of winging it, he can be listening to it and getting a jump on it lyrically. Some of the songs I had melodies for. I’d hum them to Jack and then he’d write lyrics.

MR: During the process, were there any surprises, like songs changing drastically from their original versions?

NS: There were only a couple songs that I had really sketched out with Jack before we got there. I had actually written the music for “Take A Ride” a long time ago when I was working with Paul Rodgers but it never happened. I just said to myself after I heard Marco’s voice, “Well, I think he’s got a bluesy quality in his voice and he could hold this up,” so we went at that lyrically, but I had the music already. “What You Want” was something that I had already done a demo of with Jack at his house and we pretty much just laid it down like the demo. I worked on “On My Way” up at Jack’s house, too. That one was put together very well. The rest of them were just kind of like winging it when we went in there.

MR: Were there any songs in particular where you might have used a new technique or technology than you’re used to? Did you take any different or bigger stretches on So U?

NS: The song “So U” itself is over nine minutes long. It all started with this sound that I was getting through the effects axis–a piece of gear I use now–and there was this very cool sound. It almost sounds like a synthesizer with bouncing echoes, kind of like in a U2 sense, but a little bit more surreal. It started out with that sound and I just kind of jammed with Deen all the way through the nine minutes of it. I was going to chop it up and take some of the bits out, but then after I started overdubbing with it I said, “Wow, this is really cool.” I really like that it falls down and goes into this Electric Lady land vibe where it floats around for a second with a wah-wah guitar. I got it to do the 1970s Echoplex, slowing down the tape machine a little bit so it sounds like the spaceship is moving around from side to side, to simulate some of that stuff. I had fun with that track, stretching it out and making it make sense. It didn’t make sense when we cut it with just one guitar and drums, but with a little bit of imagination and some overdubbing, I thought it really took shape. Then we figured out where the vocals were going. I sang the verses and then I had Marco do his freestyle Curtis Mayfield-type bluesy stuff on the intro and the ending. Then Deen does all the high vocals when a track is up and moving after I sing the verses, he’s got that wailing voice that ists there on top. It was fun to do, man. I hadn’t sung in a long time and I’m not even close to Deen and Marco. Deen is an amazing singer, he’s been killing every night. People are wowwed.

MR: What’s the story on Deen?

NS: Deen has been singing live with Journey forever. He’s like the little secret weapon back there. If Arnel is struggling some night, if he has a cold or a virus or something, Deen will help everyone get through the show. I think it’s so mindf**king when Deen does “Mother Father,” which is a song that goes way back. I wrote the music with my dad and then John and Steve finished it years ago in the eighties when we did it on the record. But the drum parts are very difficult, Steve Smith’s drum parts, and the vocals are very difficult, and Deen does both of them effortlessly. Deen is somewhat of a freak that he can do that, he really is. He’s so talented. There are other singing drummers out there like Phil Collins, Don Henley, and a bunch more. But those two come to mind and I haven’t seen either of them play intricate drum parts like on “Mother Father” or high vocals that are all completely removed from the drums. He’s kind of like Sting. When I first saw Sting, he was playing bass pedals and singing completely off the beat, playing these syncopated reggae bass parts and I thought, “Wow, this guy’s dexterity is sick.” Deen is like that. He’s kind of like an octopus, he’s got all the limbs going and the vocals going and they’re all doing different things. It’s pretty amazing to watch.

MR: Neal, you got a lot of critical acclaim for the album The Calling.

NS: Yeah, and there’s one in the can that I feel is the best of all of them. It’s just waiting for me to get a break and get better and get off tour and rest up and then I’ll head in and finish mixing that. It’s sort of my follow up to The Calling. We’re taking it a few steps further. Actually, when we recorded the record, I was thinking more about playing live. It’s a little more of an organic record in the sense that it’s really jam-y. You can tell it’s a live performance-type record when you listen to it. As soon as I heard it I said, “I’m going to love playing this stuff live,” and I will do that. It’s Steve Smith again on drums and I played bass again. Jan Hammer is all over this record, he’s totally on fire more than I’ve heard him. The whole record is kind of like that. Igor Len, my other keyboard player, did some of the writing and embellishments and orchestrations. It’s not quite as layered as The Calling, it’s not as produced in a sense. It sounds great, it doesn’t sound raggedy, and I did less overdubs and left it more raw. I think it works with a record. That’s going to be called Neal Schon Vortex.

MR: You recorded a couple of albums with Jan Hammer a while back. Might this be a musical reunion for you guys or do you still get together for projects often?

NS: Well, Jan has been pretty quiet, not really doing much at all, so when I reached out to him with The Calling, I didn’t know if he would get back to me or not. I sent him the couple of tracks that he played on for the record and asked if he’d do a couple of solos and he never got back to me. But two weeks later, he sent a track to me that he’d played on. He’s kind of like that, you know? This time, I reached out and I sent him the tracks and he had them for a few months before he actually played on them. I think he just wanted to sit on it and think about it for a while. He just smoked, completely smoked the tracks.

MR: Does Vortex musically come close to the Schon/Hammer days?

NS: Playing-wise, I think it’s a step further than that. Everybody’s playing is quite a few steps further than that. There’s some stuff on here that’s really on the ceiling. I think it’s going to twist a lot of heads when this comes out, just from the performances. Everybody’s on top of their game on this record. There are no vocals, it’s just instrumental. Right now, I have eighty-five minutes worth of music, so it’s a double CD.

MR: Neal, you’re pretty famous for being a member of Journey, but your time with Santana is pretty important as well. And lately, you’ve gotten together with Carlos to make some music together.

NS: I love playing with Carlos and the guys. It was so much fun, and we’re going to do more. Carlos has a very busy schedule as well as me this year. When we get off tour in September or maybe closer to November, we’re supposed to both be off and we’ll go back in the studio again around that time and cut some more stuff. We went in the studio and had nine tracks before we both went on tour. This stuff sounds amazing and we know what we both need to come up with after listening to that. We cut a lot of stuff that was sort of inside the box and song-oriented, very good. But Santana is known for the other side as well, so I think we’re going to go back in and get a little more outside and up tempo. We’ll do about four tracks like that. When I talked to Carlos, we were both on the same page. I love going back and getting into that music, that’s some of my favorite music ever.

MR: When you get together with Carlos or Paul Rodgers or any other artists, do you soak in what happens during the experience playing with them and take it into your own projects?

NS: Absolutely! You’re as good as the people that you’re in the room with. That’s what I’ve always found. I’ll sound completely different as a guitarist playing with different people. When I play with Paul, because I was a big fan of Free, I go more towards blues and my roots, more of a flashed-up Paul Costas. I was a big fan of his playing, so it’s a natural thing to hear from me because as a kid, I was turned on to Free and that’s imbedded in my system. I’ll never forget that stuff.

MR: And a couple of your other stops along the way were being in Bad English and HSAS.

NS: Yeah, I love all those projects. Bad English, we were extremely successful for a brand new band. John Waits was a tremendous singer and we had some great songs. I actually went back and listened the other day and was like, “Wow, this is a Goddamned good band.” We didn’t quite see eye-to-eye on where we wanted to travel musically, which I think inevitably broke up the band. But our first record was very strong. The second record is very good, too. We went through a very weird recording process with producers and stuff during that record, it wasn’t as smooth. The first record was very easy.

MR: Where do you feel Journey is heading? Is there a game plan when it comes to Journey or, at this point, are you guys just getting together to have fun?

NS: We are talking about getting together and recording a new record. We just don’t know quite what we’re going to do. I think musically, we know where we’re going to go. We’re not going to try and reinvent the wheel, yet we’re not going to try and repeat anything we’ve done either. We did some experimental records back a ways, even with Steve Augeri. We had this record called Red Thirteen, it was this little EP, and then we did this record called Generations and Arrival. There are three records there and I feel like–maybe not all the way through the three records–there are some great songs there that could be redone, re-looked at and re-recorded with Arnel. That’s one idea that I’ve been tossing around with Jonathan [Cain] and he sort of agrees with me. Once we get going and the music is going, I know that we’ll write some brand new stuff as well. That’s just a given.

MR: Here’s a delicate question and it’s out of curiosity, not gor gossip. You guys are on a great path with Arnel, but will Steve Perry fit into Journey’s world anymore?

NS: I had been collaborating with Steve on a friendly basis just through email…it seemed like we were on a friendly basis. But he wasn’t ready to get together and he isn’t ready to get together. He’s said numerous times now that there’s no reunion and that he’s not interested in doing anything like that. When Steve left, he wanted to do his solo thing and I think he remains there. We’re fine, we’re doing great the way we are. I don’t think you’ve seen the massive crowds that we’ve had, but we’ve continued the legacy amazingly well. The door has always been open. I’ve approached him to work on a couple of things with me that were not even Journey-oriented, but he wasn’t interested in doing it. It’s fine, man. I wish him well and he says that he wishes us well.

MR: I’ve seen many iconic bands release projects that feature guest artists paying tribute to the older hits with re-recordings. Has that ever been a thought for Journey’s catalog?

NS: Nah. We’re not really interested in that. I think people resort to that when they really run out of steam and ideas. I’ve seen it happen. There are a lot of different artists that end up doing these records and it’s whoever’s album and it’s everybody on the planet on the record except for that artist. Sure, I see it happen all the time, but I’ve never been interested in doing it solo-wise or in Journey.

MR: Neal, what advice do you have for new artists?

NS: It’s a rough business out there. It’s very, very difficult to get notoriety as a new artist. What I tell my son who’s an amazing guitar player is just be seen as much as you can be seen, play wherever you can play and if you play well enough, I’d hit up every studio in the area and say you’re available for session work and just play with as many people as you can play with and be heard. With the demise of record companies and even clubs… Smaller clubs are the place for a new artist to play because you can’t play anything bigger than that with clubs for the most part. It’s really rough, man, everything is in the digital domain. Try to make decent recordings and use what you have. With the new equipment out there, you can actually make a great-sounding record in your bedroom off a computer…Pro Tools and a computer. I think it’s possible; the thing is just getting it out there. I think the best means of doing that is through all the media. Everything is media driven, It’s so different than it used to be. You don’t have record companies working it and A&R guys. It’s very difficult.

MR: Is there any technology out there that you’re liking these days?

NS: I love the Fractal unit that I’m using, the Axe-Fx. That unit is monstrous. I use it live, I use it in the studio, I have rows and rows of amplifiers, you can do studio effects on it, it’s a pretty amazing piece of gear that you can plug in and use in any instance. You can be live, I can literally just leave without a back line, take that box and a small case and a couple of guitars and head to Europe or wherever and plug directly into a PA and have all my sounds there. Traveling light is really a great way to go. It’s very road-trustworthy. I’ve used it on tour now for years and have never had a problem, which means everything.

MR: With The Calling, So U, and Vortex, it looks like you’re ramping up the Neal Schon part of your career. Is that where you’re heading now?

NS: It’s inevitable that I’m going there, yeah. It’s something I’ve been working at my whole career. It doesn’t mean this is the demise of anything. It just means that I keep adding more and more to it and I will find a place to go do that solo stuff, and when I do a solo thing this time, I’m going to have so much material to pick from that’s going to be brand new material and there’s a lot of old stuff sitting there that I could also play. The main thing for me will be being able to put together the right band of whom I’m going to play with and have enough time set aside to actually rehearse and learn the stuff properly and put the show together. But at this point, I feel like when I do go out, I’m going to have monstrous material to play live. Most of it probably will be instrumental. I think that the So U record, if we were to do anything with that… It was really more a band record than a solo record, except for the instrumentals that are on it. But Deen is all over the place , he’s doing so many projects. Marco’s in like three or four bands. I’m going, “I don’t know if I could put a band name on this record because I don’t know if it will ever be a band,” so I decided to make it a solo record featuring those guys. But if we were ever to do anything together, I think the band name would be So U.

MR: It must be hard to keep on a straight line with a solo career.

NS: With all the solo material I have out there now, I think the right thing to do before even trying to play any dates would be to do a live DVD in a controlled area, whether it be a studio or wherever, in front of a live audience. Do a live DVD and make sure it sounds really, really good and then you’ve got something for people to actually latch on to and watch and go, “Oh, I dig this,” or “I don’t dig it,” and “I want to see that,” or “I don’t want to see it.” That’s kind of where my head’s at.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with Judas Priest’s Rob Halford

Mike Ragogna: Hi Rob. How did Judas Priest’s approach to the new album Redeemer Of Souls differ from the last?

Rob Halford: I think the challenge, if you want to call it that, is just to really dig to come up with something that’s fresh, that’s new, that’s different from a previous experience. That is just the way that Priest has been doing things for forty-odd years, really. I don’t think anything has really changed that much in the way that we’re doing things.

MR: Maybe any surprises that came up during the recording process?

RH: I suppose the big surprise was having Richie “The Falcon” Faulkner with us now for the first time. Richie’s input can’t be overstated. He made some incredible additions to our new record. He’s just got this phenomenal completeness about him, not only as a guitar player but also as a writer and most definitely on stage. Richie’s involvement on this record was very important along with Glenn and myself, getting the focus and keeping everything on track to try and make a really strong, fierce, energized metal record and that’s what we’ve been able to do.

MR: Was this album more about exploring basics and essentials than expanding the group’s musicality?

RH: Yeah. The mantra we kept chanting was, “Heavy metal, heavy metal, heavy metal,” which has served us well over the decades. A short sidebar… Whenever we record with Priest, the idea of being able to transpose the recording into a live format is very important to us. Sometimes we’re able to do that relatively easily, but sometimes it can be a bit different. Compare the complex arrangements and sounds of Nostradamus to the very straightforward approach of Redeemer Of Souls. It’s such a good example. We really wanted to emphasize the basic instrumentation of the band with very few embellishments. It genuinely is about as live as you can possibly get in that respect.

MR: Is what inspired Judas Priest originally the same as what inspires you now? Did successful careers and becoming famous affect thngs?

RH: You know, that’s a really cool question, and I’ll answer it like this: Regardless of all the fame and success and the fifty-million records we’ve sold, the core of what makes Judas Priest raw is still intact. When you put any kind of band together, in its pure state, it’s all about a dream, it’s all about self-belief. You start with a bunch of people that have a strong connection musically, that have an idea of making a sound and doing some shows, and that’s what we still do in this band. I’m really pleased that none of that has been sidetracked by any of the extraneous things that can happen when you do become successful. When you take all of that away, you’re just left with your band, you’re just left with your music, and that’s really what I think is still at the heart of Judas Priest, the simple love, the passion that we have from making music.

MR: And do you think that’s what connects you to the audience after all these years?

RH: Yeah, I think so, Michael. Particularly, metal fans. Metal fans can smell anything that’s less than pure and genuine. They can sense it. I think we had the most amazing time due to that fantastic relationship with our fans. Our fans know we’ve given our hearts to all of them. We’ve been writing and recording and performing, and I think that’s part of the success of Judas Priest as well. We’ve maintained that friendship for twenty albums. You’ve got to be upfront and as real as you should be.

MR: Does the scene or this whole lifestyle ever get old, or is it still a thrill after all these years?

RH: Yeah, the thrill is still there. It’s still the best thing you can ever have in your life, being in a band that has this wonderful connection through multiple generations of fans. It’s really heartwarming and it’s very inspiring. It’s also very humbling because it’s a different world today from when we began making metal forty years ago. In today’s world, the metal fans find you themselves. They’re not led to you by radio or the media, and I don’t mean that in an insulting way. What I’m saying is these young metalheads with their smartphones and their laptops and their texting and tweeting and Instagramming and Facebooking are on a personal journey of self-discovery regarding the music they want to get into. For that portion of your fan base, it’s quite remarkable. It’s a combination of all of those wonderful aspects that various generations of fans bring to the shows and bring to the records. It matters, really.

MR: If you look at metal through the years, it’s had many variations. Might a decent way to describe metal these days be classic rock on steroids?

RH: I think I’ve lived long enough now to be able to move past a lot of issues that I have personally with certain types of metal. I thought we started with a very pure form of music that then became all kinds of alien species. When that started to happen it was a bit confusing to me, but now I embrace it, I think it’s all extremely potent and valuable and important. More than anything else it just shows you the diversity of this kind of music. All of the things that branched out into various subgenres come from the roots of a band like Judas Priest. It’s amazing, really, that it’s been able to take on all of these different manifestations. It’s fantastic, I love it. Anything that encourages the strength and power of metal globally is clearly something we should welcome.

MR: Who were your first influences?

RH: When we began, we didn’t really have much in the landscape to go to for inspiration on our level because it was a brand new music. For me as a singer, I was inspired by all the greats of the time, whether it was Janis Joplin or people like Robert Plant or Mick Jagger–singers that had some power or personality. Even the roots of singing in metal, which is the blues, people like Bessie Smith, for example; people that were singing from the heart, just a pure, flawless type of strength and delivery. That was what I was thinking about when I became a professional musician. I daresay the rest of the guys in the band, at the time, would have been pushed by those artists that they were involved with. I think really the foundation of the House of Judas Priest is multi-layered, coming from all areas of classic rock and bluesrock. It’s a wonderful place to build from because it’s so psychedelic, really. We’ve often said that to be able to live through the sixties and the seventies was quite phenomenal. The originators have now moved on or passed away, but what a wonderful source for Judas Priest to have gone to. We really value that.

MR: I’ve had the thought that metal’s closest cousin is really opera because of the relentless theatrics and crescendos. What do you think about that?

RH: In Judas Priest’s world, we’ve embraced all of that fire and flair and flamboyance and strength and power. Judas Priest is a very hard band to pin down. We call ourselves a classic metal band, but we’ve done a lot of things over the decade. I think we were one of the first metal bands to bring out that type of production, actually, the big dramatic shows. You look on YouTube at shows we did in the eighties, for example. The Turbo show was gigantic, so was the Defenders Of The Faith tour, which is celebrating thirty years this year. The Painkiller tour more recently, the Epitaph tour… We’ve always embraced that because heavy metal music has always been known to be larger than life in volume, in power, in the visual aspect of it. We’ve always tried to take on all of those extra elements to push the power of metal through Judas Priest.

MR: Where do you think metal embraced religious and occult themes? It seems like some bands use them and some bands don’t and there’s not really an eye batted either way anymore.

RH: Judas Priest is a great name. I love the name of my band. I think it’s one of the most original, strong names ever. It’s not only a great name, there’s only one Judas Priest, but in the two words you get a sense of what we tried to do with our music. You’ve got Judas, who betrayed Christ, so you have that kind of dark element, and then you have Priest, which is obviously the other direction, it’s a sense of purity and empathy and light and all the goodness. It’s the two things–the negative, the positive, the left, the right, the dark, the light, the power of the metal, the more subdued elements. It’s a wonderful name that translates into some of the things that we’ve been trying to do with our music throughout the years. But as far as the antagonistic side of it, I think it’s great if you’ve got a name that provokes. To me, that’s what rock ‘n’ roll has always been about. Rock ‘n’ roll was invented to do what it did. It wasn’t a music that was invented to be taken lightly, it was a music to create revolution, and it should still do that now.

MR: To me, one of your album covers really illustrates that juxtaposition of light and dark you were talking about, British Steel. It said a lot without being an overblown illustration.

RH: Yeah, it did. That artwork has become iconic, really. If you look in the history of rock ‘n’ roll covers, you’ll always find the British Steel razor blade in there somehow. Again, your artwork should try and project the entity of the music that’s displaying. It still makes people wince a little bit; it’s like a paper cut, or dragging your nails across a chalkboard. It kind of goes down your spine, doesn’t it, when you look at it for the first time. There’s something very appealing about it even though it’s quite menacing. It’s got a Dexter quality about it.

MR: You might say whoever came up with the cover concept was pretty sharp. Sorry.

RH: [laughs] Oh, I agree, yeah. Just the title, British Steel, just the two simple words along with the simple cover sent an extraordinarily loud message around the world. And particularly at the time that it came out, Michael, as you know 1980 was the beginning of what’s still referred to as one of the greatest decades that heavy metal had. If you look at all of the metal that came out from 1980 to 1987, it’s quite mind-blowing; extraordinary talent from all over the world, particularly the UK and US. The 1980s was the epitome of metal music really taking hold of the world and giving it a good shake.

MR: Rob, Judas Priest and a handful of bands like AC/DC collectively were the clarion call that metal was here to stay whether anyone liked it or not.

RH: Yeah, exactly. It was an extraordinary decade because, of course, not only were we gaining tremendous success, but we were also gaining tremendous pushback from parts of the world that were becoming quite intimidated and a little afraid of what we were doing. I think there was a feeling in some parts of the establishment that metal was going to be just as reactionary as what was happening in the sixties in America, around the Vietnam War and everything. You have these extraordinary figures, whether it was Dylan or Crosby, Still & Nash or any of those provocative performers, and there were some people in the establishment in the eighties that felt that heavy metal was going to be just as potent in its reach. And to some extent, it was. Even though the eighties was an extremely affluent time for a lot of people–it was just a major pig out in all forms–I think there were some areas of the establishment, i.e. the PMRC organization, that were legitimately concerned about the values of some of the things that were going on. The 1980s was an amazing time in many reference points.

MR: So the mission of metal in the 1980s? Mission accomplished. Now what is the mission of metal today? There’s no one left to shock.

RH: You’re absolutely right. I think the invention of the internet has really dissipated the shock value of anything anymore. Maybe that’s a good thing, because shock value can have its appeal, but if it’s not supported by some kind of quality good music, it doesn’t have much value, does it? I was talking to some friends the other day about the last really great shock artist that had substantial music–my friend, Marilyn Manson. There won’t ever be another Marilyn Manson because it’s all been done now, and kids are doing it themselves. They don’t need to go and look at an artist or watch something on TV, they’re doing it themselves and posting it on YouTube, thanks to Jackass. It’s probably not much of a great loss, in my mind anyway.

MR: Well, the key now to breaking acts is supposedly social media, but the key to breaking in the metal genre also used to be the great discovery of the mystery behind the band. It almost seems like social media would work against that, wouldn’t it?

RH: Two of the greatest bands that pushed back against all of the intrusiveness were Led Zeppelin, who never gave an interview in their lives and Tool who you never saw a picture of. Also to some extent KISS, because they took the makeup off. That’s a very interesting question, Michael, because even in recent years, Priest had to get on board with that. I’ve always treasured the mystique and the mystery and the magic of a rock ‘n’ roll show. I don’t really want to know what’s on the deli tray in the dressing room. I don’t want to see how everything works. I just want to get lost in the escapism and fantasy of a rock ‘n’ roll show. But that’s over now, that’s completely gone. Now if you don’t jump on board and get integrated in social media you’re going to get left behind. They’ll all be getting down to the nitty-gritty, getting down to the basics of what good music is all about, that’s probably getting more honest and truer now than ever before. You win some, you lose some, Michael.

MR: So was the band going back to basics through Redeemer redeeming for Judas Priest in some respects?

RH: I think what we try to do is keep the brand and tradition of Judas Priest alive with a title like Redeemer Of Souls. It marries well with Sad Wings Of Destiny, Screaming For Vengeance, Defenders Of The Faith. We’re just reaffirming a lot of things about ourselves with that title, and it just happens to have another kind of evocative sense about it. Whose souls are we redeeming? Are we redeeming your souls? Is this redeemer just a simple fantasy character? What are we about? We like to bring a lot of thought process and interest and value to not only the titles of our records but also to the artwork. When you look at the artwork and you read the title your head starts spinning trying to make sense of it. I think as long as we’re doing that we’ll lead everybody to draw their own conclusions.

MR: Rob, here we go again. What advice do you have for new artists?

RH: Well, I’m probably going to repeat myself, but you’ve got to try your damnedest to be as original as you possibly can. You’ve got to be dedicated to practice, practice, practice. You can’t practice enough. Those are two important elements, but again it’s all the peripheral stuff. You’ve got to be prepared for a f**king battle, man. It’s a never-ending battle to be in a band, on all levels. You’ve got to be prepared to be able to handle that mentally. Keep your music at the heart of what you do, but be prepared to take on all of the other non-musical aspects and somehow find a way to deal with it all.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with Edgar Winter

Mike Ragogna: Edgar, there’s a new album, Superstars Of Classic Rock Honor The Music & Legacy Of The Doors, and you played on “The Crystal Ship” with Chris Spedding. How did you get invited and what do you think of this project?

Edgar Winter: I think The Doors are one of the classic groups, and I think we’re all tempted to feel like the time in which we grew up was somehow special, but I really do believe that there were two golden eras in music: The forties and fifties of big band, jazz and swing, and the sixties and seventies of rock. To me, they’re really unparalleled. I was not that familiar with The Doors on the east coast, they were more of a west coast band. I’m from Texas originally and I moved to New York right out of high school and lived there for twenty plus years until my wife Monique and I moved out here to California. So I’m a New York Texan living in Beverly Hills. When the Doors thing came along