Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens - Great Expectations  artwork

Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: October 4, 2010

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


The novel centers around a poor young man by the name of Pip, who is given the chance to make himself a gentleman by a mysterious benefactor.  Great Expectations offers a fascinating view of the differences between classes during the Victorian era, as well as a great sense of comedy and pathos.

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Miro Heiskanen’s Texas-sized expectations

The No. 3 overall pick from 2017 has taken on a big role for the Stars this season, leading some to pencil him in as the NHL’s next great blueliner.
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Something Navy Crashes Site, Beats Expectations at Nordstrom

Arielle Charnas, the influencer behind the popular fashion blog and social channels Something Navy, had a “wildly successful” launch of her collection exclusively at Nordstrom on Monday, according to a Nordstrom spokeswoman.  The brand was so popular it crashed the site in the first hour, which was quickly remedied.
Many customers complained online that they weren’t able to buy what they put in their shopping bag since the site crashed, and once it was back online Nordstrom had sold out of the items.
The introduction followed the successful launch of the Treasure & Bond x Something Navy capsule collection last fall. That capsule was estimated to have racked up sales of about $ 1 million in less than 24 hours, as reported.
On Monday, Something Navy sales beat expectations, according to the spokeswoman. Among the best sellers were a v-neck slouchy pullover, which was available in five colors for $ 79; the double-breasted topper coat in check pattern for $ 139, and the teddy coat, available in two colors, blue and tan, for $ 149. The tan sold out Monday and the blue is still available in large and XXL.

The blue teddy coat is still available in a few sizes. 

Charnas will make an appearance at Nordstrom’s Yorkdale

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Expectations – MAGIC!

MAGIC! - Expectations  artwork

Expectations

MAGIC!

Genre: Pop

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: September 7, 2018

© ℗ 2018 RCA Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

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Expectations – Hayley Kiyoko

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Expectations

Hayley Kiyoko

Genre: Pop

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: March 30, 2018

© ℗ 2018 EMPIRE / Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States. A Warner Music Group Company

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NHL expectations vs. reality ratings: Who’s better, worse and what’s next

Having reached the quarter mark of the 2017-18 season, it’s time to review our preseason thoughts on each team, see how they match up with reality and explore what to expect the rest of the way.
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Economics and Expectations (with a Trump point)

When I was studying economics in college, the most surprising thing I learned is that economics is what happens when you combine psychology with resources. I had assumed economics was more of a math/formula sort of discipline. There is plenty of that too, but the core of economics is human psychology.

Let’s talk about that.

The reason I say economics is psychology plus resources is that every transaction is based on human expectations. Businesses will invest heavily today if they believe customers are optimistic and likely to spend. If the mood is pessimism, and people are saving their pennies, those expectations stifle business investment. 

I could go on for an hour about how your expectations are what creates value in this world. For example, you only make deals with people that you expect to perform. You only hire people you expect to do the job well. You only spend money if you expect to someday make more. You only buy a home when you expect real estate values to be strong in the future. And so on.

Economies run on expectations. And expectations are the result of our complex human psychology.

Consider Donald Trump’s deal-making skills. One of the clever things he has done over his lifetime is build up a set of expectations around his personality and operating style. When he enters a negotiation, you expect him to keep hammering until he wins. But you also expect a lot of energy and attention when it comes to a Trump deal, so your odds of making money with a Trump deal are good even if you are not the “winner” of the negotiations. 

Now imagine a President Trump – a deal-making, super-optimist with a reputation for making money. What does that do to an economy? It probably super-charges it in a way no one has ever seen. The expectations under a Trump presidency would be similar to a Reagan vibe in the sense that people would assume the economy was going to trend up, so investment would follow that expectation.

Economics is a self-fulfilling system in the sense that optimism and expectations create money where there was none before.

Let me say that again. You can’t hear this too much. Optimism and positive expectations create money where there was none before.

Now let me take this down to the small.

Inside Donald’s Trump’s skull is a moist, wrinkly, grey object that weighs about three pounds. That thing is glowing with optimism. If it gets into the Oval Office, a billion souls will change their expectation about the economy of the planet. And not one of them will be adjusting their expectations downward.

If you were to put a dollar value on the wrinkly, grey, three-pound object in Trump’s skull, what would it be?

My estimate is around a trillion dollars. That’s what an optimist-president (who is also a deal-maker) can add to an economy over eight years. Because economics is psychology. 

I remind you that I am not smart enough to know who would be the best president. And I’m not a fan of Trump’s stand on some social issues. But objectively speaking, a trillion dollars goes a long way toward helping people who need it.

If you don’t want a Trump presidency, I certainly understand that. We all have different priorities. But before you make your final decision, you should have an estimate for what it would cost to pick a candidate who does not have a positive impact on the psychology of the economy.


Scott Adams Blog

Economics and Expectations (with a Trump point)

When I was studying economics in college, the most surprising thing I learned is that economics is what happens when you combine psychology with resources. I had assumed economics was more of a math/formula sort of discipline. There is plenty of that too, but the core of economics is human psychology.

Let’s talk about that.

The reason I say economics is psychology plus resources is that every transaction is based on human expectations. Businesses will invest heavily today if they believe customers are optimistic and likely to spend. If the mood is pessimism, and people are saving their pennies, those expectations stifle business investment. 

I could go on for an hour about how your expectations are what creates value in this world. For example, you only make deals with people that you expect to perform. You only hire people you expect to do the job well. You only spend money if you expect to someday make more. You only buy a home when you expect real estate values to be strong in the future. And so on.

Economies run on expectations. And expectations are the result of our complex human psychology.

Consider Donald Trump’s deal-making skills. One of the clever things he has done over his lifetime is build up a set of expectations around his personality and operating style. When he enters a negotiation, you expect him to keep hammering until he wins. But you also expect a lot of energy and attention when it comes to a Trump deal, so your odds of making money with a Trump deal are good even if you are not the “winner” of the negotiations. 

Now imagine a President Trump – a deal-making, super-optimist with a reputation for making money. What does that do to an economy? It probably super-charges it in a way no one has ever seen. The expectations under a Trump presidency would be similar to a Reagan vibe in the sense that people would assume the economy was going to trend up, so investment would follow that expectation.

Economics is a self-fulfilling system in the sense that optimism and expectations create money where there was none before.

Let me say that again. You can’t hear this too much. Optimism and positive expectations create money where there was none before.

Now let me take this down to the small.

Inside Donald’s Trump’s skull is a moist, wrinkly, grey object that weighs about three pounds. That thing is glowing with optimism. If it gets into the Oval Office, a billion souls will change their expectation about the economy of the planet. And not one of them will be adjusting their expectations downward.

If you were to put a dollar value on the wrinkly, grey, three-pound object in Trump’s skull, what would it be?

My estimate is around a trillion dollars. That’s what an optimist-president (who is also a deal-maker) can add to an economy over eight years. Because economics is psychology. 

I remind you that I am not smart enough to know who would be the best president. And I’m not a fan of Trump’s stand on some social issues. But objectively speaking, a trillion dollars goes a long way toward helping people who need it.

If you don’t want a Trump presidency, I certainly understand that. We all have different priorities. But before you make your final decision, you should have an estimate for what it would cost to pick a candidate who does not have a positive impact on the psychology of the economy.


Scott Adams Blog

Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens - Great Expectations  artwork

Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: December 17, 2010

Publisher: Bookbyte Digital

Seller: Somerset Investments, Inc.


Charles Dickens' classic tells the coming-of-age story of Pip, the orphan who rose from miserable destitution to great wealth, with the help of a mysterious benefactor. For better or worse, Pip's life is defined through his relationships with Dickens' trademark complex supporting cast: Estella, a fellow orphan with whom Pip is infatuated; Miss Havisham, the manipulative and wealthy spinster; Joe Gargery, the closest thing to a parent Pip has ever known; a pair of escaped convicts; and many, many more.

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Straight Outta Compton beats expectations

Hip-hop biopic Straight Outta Compton has topped the Box Office with an estimated $ 56.1 million.
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Movie: Straight Outta Compton (Expectations & Review)

Task & Phraze (and Jayroctomologist) review ‘Straight Outta Compton’
 
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News in Brief: Parents Formally Announce Transfer Of Expectations To Second Child

GRAND JUNCTION, CO—Explaining that the adjustment made the most practical sense for all parties involved, local parents Beth and Ryan Morgan held a press conference Friday morning to announce the official transfer of expectations from their oldest child, Jeremy, to his younger sibling, Angie. “After a careful analysis of our prospective returns, we have opted to reassign all of our hopes and dreams for the future from our firstborn to our second child, effective as of 9 a.m. this morning,” said Beth Morgan, who claimed that their 16-year-old son’s inadequate progress in areas such as effective decision-making and academic achievement were the catalyst for his removal as the recipient of their emotional investment. “While we thank Jeremy for his years as the primary bearer of our expectations, in the long run we feel Angie is the right choice to attain professional success and relationship stability, give us …



The Onion

Laverne Cox’s Reaction To Caitlyn Jenner Reveals The Impossible Expectations Trans Women Face

There has been a din of voices — many of them cisgender — weighing in on Caitlyn Jenner’s Vanity Fair reveal. The majority of commentary has been support and praise. Aside from the usual string of transphobic comments from Internet trolls, most reactions have been positive, revolving around Jenner’s bravery, beauty and “realness” — concepts that the cis mainstream often clings to when embracing trans women. So when Laverne Cox posted a Tumblr blog yesterday celebrating Jenner, but also unpacking the politics of beauty surrounding Jenner’s warm reception, it was an interesting moment to gain real perspective from a trans woman.

“Yes, Caitlyn looks amazing and is beautiful,” Cox wrote, “But what I think is most beautiful about her is her heart and soul.”

caitlyn laverne

Cox argued that the emphasis on trans women’s beauty can be dangerous, writing, “There are many trans folks because of genetics and/or lack of material access who will never be able to embody [cisnormative beauty standards]…we should be seen as ourselves and respected as ourselves.”

Too often, mainstream acceptance is based on how traditionally feminine a trans woman can look, and often, a lack of material access, or a lack of desire to appear traditionally feminine makes it harder to achieve that acceptance. There’s no denying that wealth and whiteness inform Jenner’s positive and groundbreaking public reception.

What is perhaps most interesting about Cox’s commentary, is how just beneath the surface it seems to address (and maybe even critique) the parallels and differences between her own journey and Jenner’s.

“I have always been aware that I can never represent all trans people,” Cox writes, a sentiment she’s expressed before to address the criticism she’s received surrounding her celebrity.

Cox has an enthusiastic following, but she’s been called out in the past for being a “bad” feminist or a “bad” trans activist. In 2010, She got flack for allegedly perpetuating patriarchal ideals of womanhood on the reality series “TRANSform Me,” where she and two other trans women instilled cis women with confidence via feminizing makeovers that included getting rid of “boy clothes that women should not wear.”

In April, she appeared nude in Allure magazine, and the photo shoot was both praised as an empowering moment for trans women of color, and drew ire from feminist critics, most notably the blog feministcurrent. Blogger Meghan Murphy wrote: “So we are to believe that…achieving a ‘perfect’ body, as defined by a patriarchal/porn culture, through plastic surgery, then presenting it as a sexualized object for public consumption equates to ‘radical self-acceptance?”

At her talk at The New School last October with bell hooks, the feminist author praised Cox as a “goddess for justice,” but in the same breath accused her of conforming to Eurocentric and patriarchal ideals of beauty with her high heels, designer dresses and signature blonde wigs.

Jenner, on the other hand, has not received nearly as much criticism about her traditionally feminine appearance. Some have suggested that there’s a double standard in the way Jenner has been accepted vs. how Cox has been, that as a white woman Jenner has been afforded less scrutiny and more accolades, and that her cover photo (as Marc Lamont Hill put it on Twitter) has “smuggled in the same old cis/Eurocentric narratives about womanhood.”

Of course, the overwhelmingly positive reaction to Jenner’s transition is ultimately a good thing, and it makes sense. She’s older, she was once a beloved Olympian who represented the epitome of hypermasculinity, and has been a reality TV star connected to one of the most talked-about families in America for the last nine years.

But whether intentional or not, the image of Cox’s Time magazine cover beside Jenner’s Vanity Fair cover, speaks volumes. The timing of Cox’s blog post, and its simultaneously celebratory and critical tone, sparks questions about how the narratives of visible trans women are constructed. The Jenner buzz has a lot to do with celebrity culture and the current conversation around trans people, but it also brings up questions about race and privilege that have yet to be addressed in a meaningful way.

And yet, it’s difficult to know where and when it’s right to leverage these kinds of critiques. Did Cox’s essay detract from Jenner’s history-making moment? As it critiqued the beauty-conscious culture that informed support for Jenner, was it also critiquing her glamorous look? It’s hard to say.

Defending herself last year against bell hooks’ accusations that her feminism is compromised by her highly feminine presentation, Cox said: “This is where I feel empowered, ironically, and comfortable. I think it’s important to note that not all trans women are embracing this, but this trans woman does. And this trans woman feels empowered by this.”

Jenner’s Vanity Fair cover, similarly, is an empowering moment — even as we complicate its implications. That, perhaps, is the biggest takeaway from Cox’s essay. The expectations put on the current group of visible and successful trans women, both white and WOC, are becoming increasingly unrealistic.

Why is it the responsibility of trans women, as they knock down doors, to also subvert gender norms, to smash the patriarchy, and to defy deep-seated standards of beauty? It isn’t, and it shouldn’t be. Cox, Jenner, and all trans women should have the freedom and the agency to make their own decisions, and to walk in their own truths. There’s a larger conversation to be had, of course, about what Jenner’s Vanity Fair spread means going forward: how it will trickle down to less privileged and visible trans people, and if it will in fact effect political change. Caitlyn Jenner has cited Laverne Cox as an inspiration to her, and in spite of everything, there’s a power in that. Today, Jenner has not only graced the cover of a respected mainstream magazine and garnered the support of millions of people. Finally, she is being seen, and heard, on her own terms.

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Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens - Great Expectations  artwork

Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: October 4, 2010

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


The novel centers around a poor young man by the name of Pip, who is given the chance to make himself a gentleman by a mysterious benefactor.  Great Expectations offers a fascinating view of the differences between classes during the Victorian era, as well as a great sense of comedy and pathos.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

The Tyranny of Expectations

Last year I rejoined the ranks of the spouse-free. Things sure changed since the last time I was single.

For starters, it is not necessary for men to ask women for revealing selfies. Those photos just start showing up on your phone after you exchange numbers. A revealing selfie in 2014 is essentially just a digital business card for your dating life.

I have also discovered that the most-used characters on my phone keyboard are emoticons. When single people text each other, every sentence has to end with an exclamation mark or a smiley emoticon or else it looks like you lost interest since the last time you texted thirty seconds ago.

For the most part, texting is just a means of feeling connected at a distance. The content isn't terribly important. But the pauses between text messages mean A LOT. Single people monitor the pauses between text replies to decipher real meaning in the content. For example, if I text "I really enjoyed our time together," the real message is contained in the timing of the message not the content. If the text is sent while one person is still driving home from a date, that means you feel a strong connection. But if I text something nice and have to wait seven hours for a reply, the seven-hour wait is the message, not the content of the reply.

Single people in 2014 frequently break up with each other by text, but the words are only the punctuation at the end of the break up. The actual break-up happens with what is called "the taper." The taper is when you are texting someone at a predictable rate, such as several times per day, and you gradually reduce your texting to one message every third day. That's the taper, and it tells the other person your interest has tapered too.

But here's my biggest insight about the single world: Expectations.

I have observed two approaches to dating. One approach involves creating a checklist of expectations that you have for your next romantic partner. You might want a minimum height, a good job, geographic proximity, the same travel preferences, and on and on and on.

Then you find out that no one on the planet fits your criteria. So you have to make hard decisions about which items on the checklist you want to give up on. And if you do give up on those items, you probably resent your partner forever or try to change him/her to conform to the checklist. And that is doomed to fail.

The long checklist is a modern dating problem. Two-hundred years ago, if you and your romantic partner both liked square dancing, you had everything in common. The checklist looked like this:

  1. Are you alive?
  2. Do you like square dancing?

Today the checklist for a romantic partner is 25-items long. Literally no one meets the requirements of anyone else's checklist. So setting expectations before searching for a romantic match is doomed to fail. And the checklist approach is the primary method that most people are using. It is no wonder that 70% of marriages are unhappy

Let's call the 25-item checklist a "goals" approach to dating.

The other approach to life is the "no expectations" method I am trying to cultivate.  This is more of a system than a goal. The idea is that you arrange your life so you meet lots of people and you put no expectations on any of them. If I meet someone with a 4.5 tennis level and lots of free time, perhaps I have a new tennis partner. If we click on some other level, that's great too. No expectations.

It is too early to say if my systems approach is successful. But the first year or so have been wonderful. I'm never stressed or disappointed. Everything pleasant that happens to me feels like a gift.

Stress is essentially the gap between what you optimistically expect to happen and what actually does. That means you can eliminate stress either by changing your expectations or by changing what actually happens. Most people are trapped in a doomed loop of wishful thinking that our romantic partners will change their basic nature and start conforming to our unrealistic expectations if only we complain long enough. For comparison, here's how my model of no-expectations works:

Other Person: Do you want a hug?

Me: Yes

That's the beginning and end of my expectations. Or at least I want it to be. It isn't easy to release expectations, but I hold it as an ideal.

To be fair, if kids are part of the equation you probably do need a checklist before getting involved. So the no-expectations system isn't for every situation. I'll let you know how it works for me.

 ————————————————–

Scott Adams

Co-founder of CalendarTree.com     

Author of this book  (about systems versus goals)

Twitter Dilbert: @Dilbert_Daily

Twitter for Scott: @ScottAdamsSays

 


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Game Show Contestant Has Low Expectations When It Comes to Jewelry

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Expectations vs. Reality: Shower Sex

Otherwise known as ‘How Did I Just Get Shampoo in My Vagina?’
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