Experts’ Finals predictions: Who’s picking against a Warriors 3-peat?

Are the Warriors a lock for their fifth straight Finals appearance? Who from the East could join them, and does it matter?
www.espn.com – NBA

Experts’ award picks: Will LeBron’s move to L.A. lead to an MVP?

Who will win top individual honors in 2018-19? Our NBA writers and analysts make their predictions for MVP, top rookie and more.
www.espn.com – NBA

NHL experts’ predictions: division winners, Stanley Cup, awards

Our picks for each division, Stanley Cup Final matchup, 2019 champion and all of the major awards.
www.espn.com – NHL

Episode 185 Scott Adams: Cancelled Military Parades, Joke Experts and Opioid Lawsuits

Topics: 

  • President Trump hired an African American woman and trusted her too much
  • CNN has less anti-Trump news items today…let’s review them
  • China is effectively well managed, well run
  • NY Governor Andrew Cuomo’s inflammatory statement
  • Suing pharmaceutical companies for the opioid epidemic
  • Weed legalization discussion before midterms

 

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

The post Episode 185 Scott Adams: Cancelled Military Parades, Joke Experts and Opioid Lawsuits appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Experts’ predictions: Conference finals, Stanley Cup picks

Our NHL experts — including Barry Melrose, John Buccigross, Linda Cohn, Steve Levy, Emily Kaplan, Greg Wyshynski and Adnan Virk — forecast the conference finals and Cup winners.
www.espn.com – NHL

Video Game Sounds Explained By Experts

Four video game sound designers explain the thinking behind some of the world’s most recognizable video game sounds.
WIRED Videos

When to Trust the Experts (Climate and Otherwise)

 Our duo of hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, have elevated the perceived risks of climate change in a lot of people’s minds. Are these disasters, and the record heat in many places, a sign of climate warming already out of control?

The quick answer is maybe, but climate scientists will need a lot more data and probably a few more years to know whether we are seeing a blip or a trend. From a persuasion perspective, the fascinating thing to me is that the climate science “sides” have reversed because of the storms. And here I am only talking about non-scientists on social media. 

Last winter I saw climate skeptics (or deniers in some cases) proclaiming climate change a hoax because it was cold outside. The scientists and pro-climate-change folks mocked those poor souls for not understanding the difference between anecdotal evidence and science. You can’t determine a long term trend by looking out the window, say all scientists. And if you think you can, you’re being a big dope who doesn’t know the first thing about science.

If you don’t understand that anecdotal data in isolation is generally useless to scientists, you don’t understand anything about science. A year ago, that described a lot of climate skeptics who were looking out their windows, seeing snow, and declaring climate change a hoax.

But that was last year. This week the sides reversed. Now I keep seeing climate alarmists on social media looking at the hurricanes and declaring them strong evidence of climate change. They might be right. But if they are, it is by coincidence and not by science. Scientists say it is too early to tell. So now we have a bizarre situation in which the pro-science side is disagreeing with the scientists on their own side. That’s what confirmation bias gets you. Both sides see anecdotal evidence as real. Both sides think they respect and understand the basics of science. Both sides are wrong.

Please excuse my generalities here. Obviously there are plenty of smart people on both sides who understand that anecdotal information is not confirmation of anything. But in terms of what I see on social media, the hurricanes have turned a lot of people on the pro-science side into believers in anecdotal evidence. Here’s one example. Read from bottom up.

And this brings me to my topic of the day: How do you know when to trust experts? My hypothesis is that people who have the most experience in the real world trust experts the least. To make that point, allow me to give you a brief tour of my experience with experts.

Nutrition

When I was a kid, scientists seemed to agree on what constituted good nutrition. They even put that knowledge into a handy visual aid involving a food pyramid, and provided it to every school. We now understand the science behind it to be bunk.

Fitness

I’m old enough to have observed fitness experts revising their advice countless times. I’m no longer sure if stretching is good or bad. And the exercise experts also had the nutrition stuff wrong, along with the rest of the world, for most of my lifetime. 

Psychology

When I was a kid, Sigmund Freud was considered the leading expert on psychology even though he was dead. Now the experts in psychology considers Freud a fraud. His science wasn’t science at all.

Finance

When I was young, I assumed experts could pick stocks better than a monkey with a dart board. It turns out I was wrong. Index funds with no experts whatsoever routinely outperform the expert stock-pickers. 

I have a degree in economics and an MBA from UC Berkeley. I did financial projections for a living, first at a major bank and later at the local phone company. People considered me an expert in that narrow field. In a number of cases, I got to track how my projections compared to actual results. They were rarely close. As an expert, I deserved no credibility whatsoever. And for a good reason. My projections required human judgment on lots of variables, so the output was little more than guessing and massaging the numbers to meet my boss’s expectations.

Medical

Some of you know I lost my ability to speak for over three years because of a bizarre disorder called spasmodic dysphonia. The experts almost unanimously agreed that the source of the spasmodic dysphonia is in the brain, not the vocal cords. I ended up diagnosing myself correctly after my primary care doctor and his recommended specialists were totally stumped. (I figured it out using Google.) Once I knew the problem, I found the one surgeon in the world who claimed he could fix my problem by rewiring the nerve pathways in my neck. The operation was a success, and I recovered from an “incurable” problem. Had I listened to 99% of the experts who said the problem was in my brain, I would not have considered an operation on my neck.

I could go on like this for hours, but I think you start to see my point. At my age, and given my type of experience, I have seen experts get the big stuff wrong lots of times, even when that seemed deeply unlikely. 

That brings us to climate change. The experts are strongly aligned on one side. If you have neither the age nor the experience to know how often experts can be wrong, you probably assume the experts are credible. But if you have my type of experience, watching the fields of finance, diet, exercise, psychology, and medicine get the big stuff wrong, you start from a place of skepticism. Ideally, we would look at the details in any given situation to make our final decisions on the credibility of experts because no two cases are alike. Unfortunately, we humans are not good at using facts and reason. We tend to use our biases and then rationalize them later.

So how do we know when to trust experts and when to be skeptical? Here are the red flags you should look for in order to know how much credibility to assign to the experts.

Money Distortion

When the players have money on the line, the truth gets distorted. In climate science, money influences both sides of the debate. That’s a red flag.

Complexity with Assumptions

Whenever you see complexity, that is a red flag. Complexity is often used to deceive. And complexity invites human error. When you see complex models that claim to predict the future, stay skeptical, especially when humans are making assumptions that influence the results.

The exceptions are planetary predictions and other straightforward physics. We can predict the future location of planets without any human assumptions. That is just math and physics. But in the fields of finance and climate science, to name just two, humans are influencing the models with assumptions. That is always a red flag. I am aware of no complex prediction model populated with human assumption-tweaking that is credible, in any field. Is climate science the first exception? Maybe. But it would be unusual in my experience.

The Important Fact Left Out

When people have the facts on their side, they are quick to point it out. When a key fact is glaringly omitted, that’s a red flag.

In the world of climate science, most of you would not know the answer to this key question: Are the temperature measurements peer reviewed?

You probably assumed the temperature measurements are peer reviewed. Maybe some, or most, are. All I know for sure is that climate scientist Michael Mann says his temperature data is proprietary. He refused to release it to a Canadian court for that reason. is that a common situation, that data measurements are “secret.” I don’t know. Neither do you. That’s a red flag. It is conspicuous that you and I don’t know the answer to that basic question. Because if the raw temperature data is not peer reviewed, is it really science?

To be perfectly clear here, I don’t know the state of peer review for temperature measurements. But it is such a key question it raises a red flag as to why scientists aren’t making sure we know the raw data is clean and widely reviewed. 

Conflation of Credibility

Whenever you see someone conflate a credible thing (such as the peer review system in science) with a less-credible thing (long term prediction models), that’s a red flag. If you question the accuracy of climate models, someone will mention the gold standard of peer review, even though that doesn’t address climate models that involve human assumptions. Conflation of credibility is a red flag.

My view on climate science is that different elements have different levels of earned credibility. Like this:

Basic Science: The chemistry and physics of climate change seem solid. When you add CO2 to an environment, expect some extra heat, all other things being equal.

Temperature Measurements: The temperature measurements used by climate scientists might be solid. But the way science has so far communicated this topic does not inspire confidence. I think you have to put a lower credibility on the temperature measurements than on the basic science, simply because of the way the topic is presented to the public. If the measurements are credible, why not tell us all about the peer review process that has validated them? And why would Michael Mann even have “proprietary” data? Isn’t everyone looking at the same stuff?

Climate Models: As soon as you hear that someone has a complicated prediction model, that’s red flag. If you hear that the model involves human assumptions and “tweaking,” that’s a double red flag. If you hear there are dozens of different models, that’s a triple red flag. If you hear that the models that don’t conform to the pack are discarded, and you don’t know why, that is a quadruple red flag. And if you see people conflating climate projections with economic models to put some credibility on the latter, you have a quintuple red flag situation.

To be fair, none of the so-called flags I mentioned means the models are wrong. But they do mean you can’t put the same credibility on them as you would the basic science.

Economic Models

Have you noticed that I seem to be the only person talking about economic models when it comes to climate change? That’s because there is a tendency to assume the economic decision is so obvious no study is needed.

That’s the sort of thinking that no economist would find credible. Moreover, economists don’t believe anyone can forecast the future with long term economic models. Science might tell us we have a big problem, but economists have to tell us when to start addressing it and how hard. That part is missing.

I have seen some economic guesses of how much damage would be caused by climate change. But I have not seen one that considered opportunity cost, or the benefit of waiting for better technology. No economist would respect a prediction that ignored those two enormous variables. And those variables are deeply unpredictable by their nature. 

The One Sided Argument

When I see climate scientists in the media, they are never accompanied by skeptical scientists who can check their statements in real time. Likewise, articles by and about skeptics are usually presented without simultaneous debunking by the experts on the other side. Those are red flags. Any presentation of one side without the simultaneous fact-checking by the other is useless and almost certainly designed for persuasion, not truth. The problem here is that both sides of the climate debate are 100% persuasive when viewed without the other in attendance. If you think your side is the smart side, check out the other side. They look just as smart, at least to non-scientists such as me.

I’ll summarize by reminding readers that I am not a scientist and I don’t have the tools to evaluate the credibility of climate scientists. If you think you do have that ability as a non-scientist, my guess is that you are younger than me or you have less experience of the type I described above. 

When I present this sort of framing to climate change believers, they generally retreat to Pascal’s Wager, which says in this case that we should treat any risk of catastrophe as if it is likely, so we aggressively address the risk and eliminate it. That makes sense in a world where resources are not constrained. But our world is the opposite. Everything we do is at the expense of something else we wanted to do. And I am aware of no economic model that considers the opportunity cost of spending a trillion dollars for perhaps a half-degree temperature improvement. 

Climate change isn’t our only mortal threat. We have pandemics, terrorism, nuclear war, the singularity, asteroids, and probably a dozen more threats I don’t even know. If we could eliminate all of those threats and have money left over, I say let’s do it. But if resources are limited (and they are), I need a strong argument to put a trillion dollars into any one of the risks.

My new book, Win Bigly, is available for pre-order. It’s about persuasion in a world where facts don’t matter to our decisions. (Even when they should.)


Scott Adams’ Blog

Experts Offer Tips for Autumn Excellence in Retail

As summer draws to a close, pleasure retail whirrs back into motion and stores hum with the sound of returning customers. Trade show orders are filled, holiday planning is under way, and shop shelves are ready to showcase last July’s most promising sex toys.
XBIZ.com – Opinion

Rob Kardashian May Have Broken California’s ‘Revenge Porn’ Law, Experts Say

It’s illegal in the state to post explicit photos of someone in order to exact revenge or cause distress.
Entertainment News, Photos and Videos – HuffPost Entertainment
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Design Industry’s Leading Experts Discuss LA/NY Rivalry


As New York’s creative brain drain intensifies, East Coast ex-pats tout the Golden State.

read more



Style

Design FX – Find Out How FX Experts Created Mars in “The Martian”

Visual effects companies Framestore and MPC were tasked with creating the red planet in “The Martian.” From realistic landscape shots of Mars to simulated gravity differences, see how it all came together with a shorter-than-usual timeframe for post-production.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

Hollywood’s Rash of Interview Walkouts: PR Experts Offer Solutions


Robert De Niro becomes the latest (following Robert Downey Jr. and Cate Blanchett) to flee (or fuel) social media flames: “If you feel something going negative, you don’t have to tie a noose for your own hanging.”

read more


Hollywood Reporter

EXPERTS: Ashley Madison Hack Data Is Real

WASHINGTON — The user data pillaged from affair website Ashley Madison and dumped onto the Internet appears to be the real deal, independent security experts said Wednesday. The website reportedly has as many as 37 million users, and gigabytes of names, addresses, credit card numbers and emails allegedly tied to the site were leaked onto the so-called “dark web” late Tuesday night.

“The debate about the authenticity of the Ashley Madison breach is as good as over,” Troy Hunt, a developer and web security specialist who runs a website that helps people discover whether they’ve been victimized by a data breach, tweeted early Wednesday.

“It’s entirely reasonable to assume that this data is legitimate unless it can be proven to the contrary,” Hunt told The Huffington Post.

But Ashley Madison’s former chief technology officer, Raja Bhatia, insisted that he and a team of international investigators have found no evidence that the data is authentic. Bhatia, who now consults for the company, told Brian Krebs, a former cybersecurity reporter at The Washington Post, that “on a daily basis, we’re seeing 30 to 80 different claimed dumps come online, and most of these dumps are entirely fake,” in an interview late Tuesday. Bhatia said, for example, that his company had never stored credit card information, which is present in the latest leak.

“I’m still resolute with my initial assessment,” Bhatia told HuffPost early Wednesday morning, noting that it is an “ongoing process.”

Hunt, the web security expert, told HuffPost that “it’s not unusual for an organisation to deny the legitimacy of a data breach. But it won’t take long for that position to change if impacted customers continue to report evidence of their data turning up in it.”

Krebs, who first broke the story of the hack on July 19 and interviewed Bhatia Tuesday night, initially said he had no idea if the dump was legitimate. Later that night, he wrote that the evidence was hard to deny and that he had spoken with “three vouched sources” who confirmed their information was included in the data dump. “There is every indication this dump is the real deal,” Krebs wrote.

The sources Krebs spoke to claimed that personal information, including the last four digits of their credit card numbers, was included in this latest leak. Per Thorsheim, the founder and main organizer of Passwordscon, a passwords conference, also wrote that he found “several other accounts that I know” that were not found in other known breaches. He claimed an anonymous source who confirmed that his credit card data found in the dump was correct. Sam Biddle, a reporter for Gawker, tweeted that an email he once used to log in to the site for a reporting project was also included in the leak.

Some may question the value of the Ashley Madison data. It’s been widely reported that Ashley Madison did not verify the email addresses of people who signed up. In theory, an individual’s address could pop up in the data dump even if that person never actually signed up for an account — someone else could have signed up using their email. The credit card numbers, names, and home address data included in the hack — if accurate — could be much more damaging. But just because someone signed up Ashley Madison doesn’t mean they used the service. Some users’ spouses may have known they used the site.

But Ashley Madison’s records could nevertheless damage the reputations of politicians and public figures, not to mention ordinary people. “There could be genuine casualties as a result” of the leak, Graham Cluley, an independent security analyst, wrote in a blog post on Tuesday. “I mean suicide.”

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Divorce – The Huffington Post

Need to File for a Divorce!

David Simon’s ‘Show Me a Hero’ Recap: Two Experts on Urban America Weigh In


A pair of distinguished American historians of racial discrimination are writing about the show each week for THR.

read more


Hollywood Reporter

How to Make a Giant Creature – Watch FX Experts Build the Prototype of a 14-Foot Creature

The design phase is over, and now it’s time to prove that the 14-foot-tall creature can be built. As the team starts to build the prototype, challenges arise due to the creature’s size and scale.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

A Marriage Expert’s Theory On Why Celebrities Can’t Stay Married

It’s been a rough summer for celebrity couples, with many — including Jennifer Garner and Ben AffleckGwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale and even Kermit and Miss Piggy – calling it quits. And while it’s sad to watch our favorite Hollywood pairings un-tie the knot, marriage expert Fawn Weaver says most celebrity couples are doomed from the start. 

As the Argument-Free Marriage author explained in a HuffPost Live interview on Tuesday:

The problem with celebrity marriages is that they’re not built to last. It’s very difficult to stand up against the spotlight in that manner, so we’re looking at these guys — we put them on these pedestals so they feel as though they have be fake all of the time and they have to go over the top, and that’s hard to do. They’re not able to really deal with their stuff.

Weaver, the founder of The Happy Wives Club, urges quarreling couples to slow down in their approach to problem solving.

 ”When you feel your emotions accelerating, immediately decelerate them,” she said. 

 Watch more from Fawn Weaver’s conversation with HuffPost Live here.

Sign up here for Live Today, HuffPost Live’s new morning email that will let you know the newsmakers, celebrities and politicians joining us that day and give you the best clips from the day before!

 Also on HuffPost:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Divorce – The Huffington Post

Need to File for a Divorce!

News: Experts Say Best Option Now Is Keeping Nation As Comfortable As Possible Till End

WASHINGTON—Saying there were no other options remaining and that continued intervention would only prolong the nation’s suffering, experts concluded Tuesday that the best course of action is to keep the United States as comfortable as possible until the end.

According to those familiar with its condition, the country’s long, painful decline over the past several decades has made it clear that the most compassionate choice at this juncture is to do whatever is possible to ensure America is at ease during its last moments.

“We need to accept the fact that the U.S. doesn’t have long—simply helping it pass that time in comfort is the humane thing to do,” said economist Danielle Martin, speaking on behalf of a large group of experts ranging from sociologists and historians to lawmakers and environmentalists, all of whom confirmed they had “done everything [they] could.” “Attempting to stabilize …





The Onion

Experts Weigh In On Study Showing Correlation Between IVF And Autism

A recent Columbia University study published in the American Journal of Public Health finds that children conceived through assisted reproductive technology (ART), such as in vitro fertilization, are twice as likely to develop autism as those conceived without ART. The study included nearly 6 million children born in California between 1997 and 2007.

But a panel of experts on The Doctors, including Fox News correspondent Dr. Marc Siegel, caution that the findings did not prove a causal effect, only an association.

“The problem is this is not proof,” says Dr. Siegel. “The truth is that IVF is extremely helpful, and actually, as part of in-vitro fertilization, they look over the genetics of the egg, so there’s less likelihood there to be a problem. I think the take-home message here, which gets lost a lot of the time, is it’s about how many embryos you should put in at one time. How many embryos do you use? Because they find that with multiple embryos and multiple births, there’s a higher risk of complications.”

Dr. Jennifer Ashton, an Ob-Gyn, concurs. “You don’t know whether it’s the in-vitro process that can potentially introduce these harms or is it what is causing the infertility in the first place, and is that a factor? Association is not the same as causation. That’s so important for people to understand,” she says. “We’re not throwing out a Columbia study with 6 million people involved. That’s a big study, and it’s reputably done,” she clarifies. But, she cautions, correlation is not the same as causation.

She adds, “We know that there are much higher risks not just to the mother but also to the fetuses if you transfer two or three embryos. So there is a big push now in this country to do just one.”

Like Dr. Phil | Follow Dr. Phil | Be on the Show | Ask Dr. Phil

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Dr. Phil – The Huffington Post

International Anal Experts

International Anal Experts

Ebony and ivory are opposites, but when a big black cock meets a wet white cunt, they can reach any agreement.

GameLink.com – Anal

B.B. King Died After Series Of Mini Strokes, Medical Experts Say

LAS VEGAS (AP) — B.B. King’s physician and the coroner in Las Vegas say the 89-year-old blues legend died of a series of small strokes attributable to his longstanding battle with type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Darin Brimhall and Clark County Coroner John Fudenberg (FYOU’-den-berg) tell The Associated Press the medical term for the cause of death is multi-infarct dementia. It’s sometimes referred to as MID, and is also called vascular dementia.

Dementia is a permanent loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases, including diabetes. It usually affects adults over age 55, and can affect memory, thinking, language and judgment.

Brimhall says King’s strokes resulted from reduced blood flow as a consequence of chronic diabetes — or unhealthy fluctuations in blood sugar levels.

King was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes many years ago.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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How Relationship Experts Knew They Found ‘The One’

“When you know, you know.” That’s the conventional wisdom when it comes to figuring out if the person you’re dating is the person you’ll be with in the long, long term.

But when and how does that seemingly elusive feeling of assurance strike? We recently asked a group of married relationship experts to tell us about the moment they knew they had found The One. Below, authors, professors, therapists and other relationship professionals share their stories.

1. They never ran out of things to say.
“On our third date, we met in the late afternoon for drinks, then we saw a movie, followed by a long, leisurely dinner. Then we decided to walk. All night. First to a cafe in North Beach, then to a jazz bar, and then just up and down the San Francisco hills, until around 6 a.m. when we said goodnight at my front door. Not once did we get bored or run out of things to say. I knew then that 10, 20, 30 years out, we’d still be talking, laughing, keeping life fresh and interesting. And we are.” – Winifred Reilly, licensed marriage and family therapist and relationship blogger

2. What she lacked, he had in spades.
“I knew my husband was The One during our first real date, which was a trip to Miami since we lived in different cities at the time. He navigated us around in a rental car, which was impressive since I have no directional capacity at all. He also was very gentle when rubbing sunscreen on me, which I liked because I thought it meant he was kind and a caretaker. I was right!” – Dr. Samantha Rodman, psychologist and dating coach

3. The relationship felt totally, completely right.
“My wife and I met in high school, we broke up on graduation, but rekindled the relationship in our senior year of college. She had the opportunity to study in Europe, and I spontaneously decided to join her for a year in romantic Heidelberg. On the plane, my exhausted wife-to-be fell into a deep sleep. I looked over at her slumbering form, and I was hit by an overwhelming feeling of rightness -– that for once in my life, I was in the right place, at the right time, with the right person. In Germany, I learned the wonderful word for ‘significant other’ or ‘sweetheart’: Lebensgefährtin. It literally means a ‘fellow-traveler through life.’ And that’s what we’ve been to one another ever since.” – Dr. Karl Pillemer, author of 30 Lessons For Loving and professor of gerontology at Cornell

4. It was love at first sight — no doubt about it.
“I knew my husband was the one at first sight. I know that sounds crazy, but we were set up and had been talking on the phone for nearly a month. Each time we’d connect by telephone, we’d talk for hours. He knew so much about me before we ever met face-to-face, and before we left dinner that night, we both knew we’d never be with another person again.” – Fawn Weaver, author and founder of Happy Wives Club

5. He was a true gentleman.
“It was a cold night in November 1985 and we were double-dating at a Lebanese restaurant in Washington, D.C. He was NOT my date! I was wearing short sleeves and I must have been shivering because Chuck took off his sweater, a red and green chevron-patterned number, and gave it to me. I slipped it on and it was so soft and smelled so good, musky and manly. We looked at each other, he’s got these see-through blue eyes, and I thought, ‘Hmmm, this could be interesting…’ And it’s been interesting for 27 years.” – Iris Krasnow, author of The Secret Lives of Wives

6. She broke all the dating “rules” for him.
“Lou was bartending over the summer after my freshman year of college and his best friend, who I had dated, was the bouncer. Lou was different from any man I had dated. I can’t really explain what it was, but he complemented me in ways I hadn’t ever considered before. I knew it from the start. And because he wasn’t going to call me (bro code), I looked through the phone book and called everyone with his name until I found him. I don’t believe in rules when it comes to love, but if I did, I was sure willing to break any and all of them.” – Dr. Logan Levkoff, sexologist and author

7. Their chemistry was off the charts.
“I knew my husband was The One on date number four. The electricity wouldn’t stop. I swear, I got electric butterflies every time I would think of him. The PDA was getting a little ridiculous that night and I told him, ‘You’re the man of my dreams.’ He said, ‘Wow, that’s a lot to live up to.’ I was actually trying to NOT be in a relationship for a long time, but there was no denying this intense chemistry.” – Marina Sbrochi, author of Stop Looking for a Husband: Find the Love of Your Life

8. His success was hers too.
“When I whispered to her, ‘They let me in [to a psychotherapy graduate program]’ her face radiated joy. More than I did at the time, she understood what this could mean to me and to us. Up until that moment, the future of my career was vague. She knew that this possibility of me becoming a psychotherapist had my name written all over it. Her assurance made her the one for me.” – Dr. Jim Walkup, licensed marriage and family therapist

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Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

Expert’s Top 10: Celebrity Makeup Artist Lina Hanson’s Picks For a Greener Makeup Bag

Celebrity makeup artist Lina Hanson shares her top 10 picks for a more eco-friendly makeup bag.
InStyle
MillionaireMatch.com - the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!
MillionaireMatch.com – the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!

Up Your Beauty Game! These Are the Beauty Experts to Follow on Instagram

They’re the masterminds behind the hair and makeup looks you’ll find on red carpets, editorials, and on the runways that act as the barometer for the next season’s beauty trends. No matter how classically trendy or daring, (take Pat McGrath’s exaggerated spider lashes at Louis Vuitton), theses makeup artists change the beauty landscape enough that […]
InStyle
MillionaireMatch.com - the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!
MillionaireMatch.com – the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!

Les Experts De La Seduction

Les Experts De La Seduction
Produit Reccurent : 5 Interviews Avec Les Experts De La Seduction. Les Meilleurs Coachs Francais Repondent A Vos Questions Sur La Seduction, Le Developpement Personnel, La Vie Du Couple, La Sexualite Etc…
Les Experts De La Seduction

Les Experts De La Seduction

Les Experts De La Seduction
Produit Reccurent : 5 Interviews Avec Les Experts De La Seduction. Les Meilleurs Coachs Francais Repondent A Vos Questions Sur La Seduction, Le Developpement Personnel, La Vie Du Couple, La Sexualite Etc…
Les Experts De La Seduction