Straight Outta Compton – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton  artwork

Straight Outta Compton

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: August 8, 1988

© ℗ 1988 Priority Records LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Janet Jackson, Nine Inch Nails, N.W.A Nominated for Rock Hall of Fame

Acts are eligible for the Rock Hall 25 years after the release of their first recording, album or single — 1990 or before for this year's nominees.
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
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Janet Jackson, Nine Inch Nails, N.W.A Nominated for 2016 Rock Hall of Fame

Janet Jackson, Chic, The Smiths, Nine Inch Nails and N.W.A are among the 15 finalists on this year’s ballot for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,…
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Chuck D Remembers Working With Ice Cube After He Left N.W.A

Chuck D also details Public Enemy’s "Man Plans, God Laughs" album.


HipHopDX News

DJ Yella Says Ice Cube Beat N.W.A. With “No Vaseline”

DJ Yella says that when Ice Cube released "No Vaseline" the remaining members of N.W.A. had been defeated.


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Compton’s Billionaire Buck discusses Kendrick, YG, Big KRIT, Freddie Gibbs, N.W.A. and The West’s Second Coming

As part of my job, I get the chance to listen to sorts of Hip Hop from all regions. But I have no shame in admitting that I have a bias for the West Coast. In my formative years, growing up in Southern California, I remember stealing borrowing a copy of my brother’s Warren G Regulate…G Funk Era and playing it obsessively. When that obsession cooled, I somehow managed to steal borrow a copy of my brother’s All Eyez On Me album.

No Brown Sugar, but a favorite question among Hip Hop heads is “when did you fall in love with Hip Hop? For me, it was hearing Pac for the first time. Born only a few months before NWA released Straight Outta Compton, and being a toddler when classics like The Chronic, Doggystyle, Quik Is The Name, Dogg Food etc. were released, I invested an extraordinary amount of time to studying/admiring/fawning over the masters. In my teenage years, I vividly remember sprinting to my mother’s car after church service to see if Power 106 was playing Shade Shiest’s “Where I Wanna Be” or Westside Connection’s “Connected 4 Life.” Even to this day, there is no genre in the world that captures me quite like So-Cal West Coast Hip Hop.

But as you well know, not long after Dr. Dre’s “Up In Smoke Tour” ended, West Coast music suffered an extended drought, to put it nicely. A few folks like The Game, Xzibit, Rass Kass nobly carried a dying genre for a time with incredibly dope shit, but a small minority can’t keep an entire Coast alive. Some (including myself) thought that the West Coast died the minute the legendary Nate Dogg passed away in 2011.

But alas! Out of no where, the West has risen again to the top of the ranks with a multitude of new shining stars. Kendrick Lamar, ScHoolboy Q, Nipsey Hussle, YG, Tyler Tha Creator, Problem, Mellowhype, DJ Mustard, Ab-Soul, Earl Sweatshirt, Jay Rock, and many more. Not to mention, the O.G.s of the game like The Game, Snoop, Suga Free, Warren G, Cube, W.C., DJ Quik, and Dr. Dre (who’s recent Compton: A Soundtrack is a classic in my book). With the release of the thrilling Straight Outta Compton movie, the West Coast has definitely gotten its second wind pimp, to quote E-40.

If you’re a music geek like me, you are obsessed with tracking the origins of historic musical movements. It’s crazy to think that a couple of (at the time) regular dudes from Compton (Kendrick, YG, Problem, Billionaire Buck) were inspired to become essentially new niggas wit attitudes, and subsequently put the West Coast back on the map.

ATTENTION: Notice I didn’t mention Tyga, simply because he’s wack as shit. Period. Whenever my Spotify connection is down, and I’m forced to listen to the radio, all I can think about is how incredibly wack Tyga is. Fuck all the talk about Obama’s birth certificate, someone needs to find Tyga’s birth certificate and erase “California” from it– he has no business representing the coast in any shape or form whatsoever. Tyga’s music is so fucking wack that if you were to first play Hotel California and then Doggystyle the wackness is so strong that it has the potential runneth over and ruin a classic, or at the very least cause permanent brain damage as your cerebral cortex scrambles to make sense of the extreme disparity in quality. Some may call me a hater or whatever, but to quote Jay, I call a spade a spade, it just it what is…and what it is is hot garbage that gives me severe migraines when I’m forced to listen.

(These views are completely my own (Kellan Miller’s), and are not at all reflective of Allhiphop as a staff, label, or as a motherfucking crew.). I say that because if Tyga happens to read this and sic his goon squad of 75lb tattooed light-skinned stick figures and Kylie Jenner on me, somehow capturing me and forcing me to listen to all 45 excruciating minutes of The Gold Album, the good colleagues that I work with shouldn’t have to suffer that level of torture. So when I say I’ve been contemplating quitting my journalism career to become a rapper, for the sole purpose of Ja-Ruling/Meek Milling Tyga, these views are completely my own. When I fantasize about creating a diss track that ended Tyga’s career, so the world would be completely rid of a skinny tree tattooed tree fig that luckily got a break when Lil Wayne had a little too much lean when he heard his demo. Inevitably, I would be awarded the Noble Peace Prize for my efforts, and I imagine Eazy-E and Mac Dre would personally rise from the grave to thank me.

But hopefully it won’t come to that, because mark my words, the next California rapper to blow is none other than Compton’s own Billionaire Buck. While he doesn’t yet have the recognition of Kendrick and YG, Buck started to make headway when he released the track “Around Da Way” about a year ago. With hot flows and thumping bass lines (ingredients of a proper Left Coast track), the song instantly became a favorite in my playlist. Watching the video made the song all the much better– featuring Buck walking through the actual streets of Compton, a nice throwback to N.W.A.’s “Straight Outta Compton” video.


At some point after putting the puzzle together, I realized that Buck, Kendrick, YG, and Problem all grew up together, and collaborated with each other back when they barely had a dollar to their name and were just dreaming about making it to the main stage. As you already know, Kendrick has arisen as one of Hip Hop’s most golden voices. When he’s not directing incredible The Wire-like music videos/films, YG is flooding the streets with pure 100% Grade A bangers. ANd with all the recent talk about ghostwriters, it’s worth mentioning that Problem probably ghost-wrote the lyrics to the song you’re smoking a blunt to as we speak, and also keeps DatPiff in business with dope mixtape after mixtape. But after his acclaimed Apollo and Eclipse mixtape series, the Hip Hop world is waiting for Buck’s latest album, The Black Jew, tentatively set for a November release.

Luckily, Buck took a short break from his current tour cycle to chop it up with me about a variety of topics.

How did you, Kendrick, and YG cross paths?

Well, we both from the same neighborhood, so we grew up together. Back in the old days, when we were trying out this rapping shit for the first time, we would all record at the same studio. Then Kendrick got his deal, and started recording in Carson, mostly with the T.D.E. crew.

Now that you guys have gotten some fame and attention, especially in Kendrick’s case, has anyone changed?

Nah. Nobody’s really changed at all. Everyone’s really busy now, which is how it’s supposed to be. We’ll always be homies, but right now it’s like brotherly competition, kinda like what Kendrick was getting at on that “Control” verse. I’m trying to be the best, period.

Is your relationship with Kendrick any different these days?

Nah, we talk all the time. TDE mainly operates on their own, which is why we haven’t really gotten the chance to collaborate yet.

In the past, you’ve talked about how big of an influence Problem had on you.

Problem is smart as hell. He was always on his shit. When we was just young cats with no idea how to make it, Problem had the blueprint mapped out. He knew the game inside and out, and was always ahead of us in terms of making moves. Early on Snoop took him under his wing a little bit and showed him some things. Then Problem turned around and schooled me on a lot things not only about the industry, but the music itself. Most times, Problem would come to the studio with the beat already made and the hook mapped out. In those days we’d be on Limewire stealing beats just to rap to and figure out our styles.

There were rumors of collaborations between you and other artists that never materialized. What happened?

Freddie Gibbs and I were supposed to do some shit together. After meeting at a show, he told me that we should link up and put out a record together. After that I hit that nigga up like 2 weeks later and his phone was disconnected. I ran into him later and he said he was down, but still nothing ever happened. A similar thing happened with Big K.R.I.T. About a year and a half ago I met him, we drank some lean, collaborated on some tracks, but he never put the shit out. But I’m not tripping, it is what it is.

Growing up, what West Coast artist would you say had the biggest influence on you?

DJ Quik. Anybody that knows anything about Hip Hop knows that Quik is a legend. During his career, I feel like he had the wrong people around him handling his business. I’ve done shows with him, you can tell he’s kind of strained and exhausted at this point. He’s definitely given his all and then some to the game.

In addition to E-40, there are rumors of a Quik collaboration on your Black Jew album. Any truth to that?

I’m working on a track with Quik, but it’s taking a while. That’s the thing about the masters of the craft. These days, rappers are in such a rush to get their shit out on Youtube or Datpiff or whatever. Quik is a perfectionist, and won’t put out anything until it meets his standards, even if it takes 10 years or something. It’s the same with Dre. They aren’t just beatmakers, they are producers in the classic sense. Dre treats your voice like an instrument. That’s why his shit with Kendrick is hot, because he makes sure the artists ride the snares like a pattern. It’s the same with Eminem’s shit. Compared to what dudes are doing now in terms of quality in the mix and production, it’s a way different experience.

Aside from your Compton people, who are some of the artists you’re feeling now?

I’m feeling Rick Ross. I like his hustle. It took him a long to blow up to mega stardom. When I see people like that get on, it’s incredibly inspiring and motivating. MMG actually reached out to me about a deal, but I figured I’d more financially stable if I had the chance to own my own material and do things exactly the way I wanted.

What have you learned about the industry over the years?

It’s crazy, and really hard to explain to anyone that’s not a part of it. A lot of rappers that make it to radio are the ones who know the right people. That’s usually what it comes down to in the mainstream. You also gotta have the right people behind you. Kendrick did it the right way, going on the road with Tech N9ne, which eventually lead to an A&R from Aftermath giving him the nod.

Can you describe in one sentence what Black Jew is going to sound like?

It’s going to be N.W.A. mixed with The Roots.

Do you think the current popularity of Compton is just temporary?

Compton is going to be on par for the next decade. You can trust that.

Make sure to track Billionaire Buck’s movements on the interwebs.

https://instagram.com/comptonsbuck/

Like Billionaire Buck on Facebook

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Filed under: Editorial, Features, Headlines Tagged: Billionaire Buck, DJ Quik, Dr. Dre, Eminem, Kendrick Lamar, N.W.A., Problem, Snoop Dogg, Straight Outta Compton, Tha Dogg Pound, Tyga, YG, YG Hootie
AllHipHop

‘Straight Outta Compton’ — Check Out the Garage that Launched N.W.A

Lil Eazy-E and Dr. Dre’s son, Curtis, took TMZ to the place of origin for N.W.A … and it’s awesome!!! It’s the house that belonged to Eazy’s mom and is featured prominently in “Straight Outta Compton.” It’s the place where…

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The Best of N.W.A – The Strength of Street Knowledge – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - The Best of N.W.A - The Strength of Street Knowledge  artwork

The Best of N.W.A – The Strength of Street Knowledge

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: December 26, 2006

© ℗ 2006 Priority Records, LLC. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Priority Records, LLC,

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Eazy-E’s Daughter Discusses “Straight Outta Compton” N.W.A Biopic

“Overall, I think it’s an incredible film,” Erin Wright says.


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N.W.A. Legacy Vol. 1: 1988-1998 (Explicit) – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - N.W.A. Legacy Vol. 1: 1988-1998 (Explicit)  artwork

N.W.A. Legacy Vol. 1: 1988-1998 (Explicit)

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 19.99

Release Date: March 23, 1999

© ℗ Compilation 1999 Priority Records, LLC. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Priority Records, LLC,

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

100 Miles and Runnin’ – EP – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - 100 Miles and Runnin' - EP  artwork

100 Miles and Runnin’ – EP

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: June 23, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Priority Records LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Straight Outta Compton (Expanded Edition) – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton (Expanded Edition)  artwork

Straight Outta Compton (Expanded Edition)

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 6.99

Release Date: August 7, 1988

© ℗ 2002 Priority Records LLC. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Priority Records LLC,

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

N.W.A. and the Posse – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - N.W.A. and the Posse  artwork

N.W.A. and the Posse

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 6.99

Release Date: December 31, 1986

© ℗ 2015 Priority Records LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Counterpoint: Pseudo-Black Revolutionary’s Hate For N.W.A.

I hate being a reactionary writer, but this dude, Minista Paul Scott makes my dick itch! (Or maybe it’s crabs?) Here goes another article focusing on how N.W.A. destroyed black America. I’m starting to think that he’s an Agent Provocateur for Fox News! (Or a pseudo-Black Nationalist of the Clarence Williams III in “I’m Gonna Git You Sucka.” See the movie! You’ll get the picture. LOL.) The “Minista” is the Prime Minister of the Messianic Afrikan Nation in Souf Cakalaka.

RELATED: OPINION: Exposin’ the Truth About NWA by Paul Scott

(Minista Paul Scott, the darling of Fox News on black stuff)

I know all too well the mindset of Minista Paul Scott and his Afrocentric, black revolutionary, religiosity. He has some of y’all gassed, but I’ve done more in that lane than he’ll ever understand! I was the student of Yahweh ben Yahweh. I was a comrade of Malachi York (when he taught on Bushwick Ave. in Brooklyn as Imam Issa—leader of the Ansaaru Allah Community). I’ve sat on the same stage as Minister Louis Farrakhan and had lunch and deep conversation with Kwame Toure’ (aka Stokely Carmichael R.I.P.). I was about that radical life in the 80’s/90’s and then went on to Major in Black Studies and Minor in Religion at the University of Nebraska, so I understand the street revolutionary mind and the academic revolutionary mind. (Did mention I wrote six books?) When Min. Paul Scott wrote, “Fuck N.W.A.” in his last article about them I said, “Fuck Minista Paul Scott!”

Min. Scott wrote a scathing article awhile back on why N.W.A. shouldn’t be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and now he’s dissin’ the movie (Straight Outta Compton)—a movie about N.W.A.’s come-up. I saw the movie Saturday and it was fabulous! All the characters were believable. Kudos to the casting director, ‘cause these actors looked like N.W.A. down to their mannerisms! Min. Scott says he won’t see the movie, even though he admits that his spirit is crying out to grab a hotdog (no doubt, Kosher) & popcorn and sit in the blackness of his local theater and finger-bang his woman (assuming he’s hetero) like the olden-days. Drop that “10 bucks” nigga!

Now let’s jump right in and deconstruct Min. Paul Scott’s quasi/pseudo-nursery-ish-Urban-Black-American-Music-for-Dummies understanding of what was going on in black America, circa 1988—when N.W.A. came on the national music stage.

The decay of urban black America was well under way by the time N.W.A. came on the scene in 1988 with one of hip-hop’s most revolutionary songs, “Fuck Tha Police.” Black Power revolutionaries Eldridge Cleaver, Huey P. Newton and Kwame Toure’ aka Stokely Carmichael would’ve been proud of the unattended children of the post-Cointelpro/F.B.I. Hoover era going hard-body-karate at the “Omnipotent Administrator” (Cleaver’s words for da man/system). N.W.A.’s song was as powerful a political statement as Public Enemy’s, “Fight The Power.” They proved that you don’t have to wear a dashiki and a black power fist to speak truth to power. N.W.A. were not your prototypical revolutionaries black folk were so familiar with—you know, those Min. Scott-type niggas that sit around drinking libations and secretly feigning for a pig’s footses sammich and pontificating about black folk’s “shit-uation,” while, at the same time exhibiting their misogyny and homophobia in the name of blackness—Paternalistically Negrotudenal (whatever the fuck that means, but you feel me?)

Reaganomics, crack cocaine, HIV/AIDS, and full-fledged turf wars by Crips & Bloods were being spread all over the country. The movies, “Boys In The Hood” and “Colors” exemplified the cultural climate in most urban cities. Throw in police brutality, which has always been an ever-present danger for black people in America that started way before any of that N.W.A. crew was birthed. From Miami’s 1981 police brutality in the Arthur McDuffie murder and subsequent riot to Los Angeles’s 1991 beating of Rodney King and the riot that followed. N.W.A. were visionaries—“Negrodamuses” who told and foretold of the violence perpetuated by police on its citizenry. Abner Louima, Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell, Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland—all products of police brutality. This is why N.W.A. screamed, “Fuck Tha Police!” They were the frustrated & raging voices of the Urban Bantustan! Gangsta rappers who did not turn a blind-eye to the bullshit in their community, Compton.

This new genre of rap music dubbed “Gangsta Rap” did not start with Compton and N.W.A. Philly rapper Schoolly D  is most notably responsible for being the early pioneer of Gangsta rap (Editor’s note: Ice-T said he was heavily influenced by Schoolly D). Min. Scott is an East Coast nigga with a bias against the West Coast and the music coming out of Cali. Maybe this explains his disdain for N.W.A.? Why doesn’t he lay the moral decay of black life at the feet of real black people killers, like New York’s Frank Lucas, Pappy Mason, Alpo and all those other miscreants that helped flood our streets with crack? Or northern Cali’s Charles Smith, underboss of the Godmother Griselda Blanco or ex-drug dealer Ricky Ross and his C.I.A. bosses who flooded the streets of South Central & Compton—turning housewives into crack whores and would-be stand-up men into dope fiends! We talkin’ da 80’s.

N.W.A. was as revolutionary as Public Enemy (without the sideshow buck-dancing antics of Flavor Flav!) In hindsight, how revolutionary was it for Eazy E to have dinner at the White House with President Ronald Reagan, the assumed enemy of most black people? What can be extrapolated from a jack-move like that? That’s a long barbershop conversation and even a longer well thought out thesis/dissertation. When the Rodney King Riot jumped off, which rapper/s had the most prolific album speaking to the woes of police Brutality? Tell me who? I’ll tell you! It was an (ex) N.W.A. spitter—Ice Cube’s 1992 album, “The Predator”—one of the greatest and most revolutionary rap albums ever written! Ice Cube murdered the subject of police brutality! He devoted that album to the cause. All of you young jits should have a listen!

Yes! We can point out some of the ratchetness of N.W.A.’s songs, as we could with most rappers and rap groups. Rappers aren’t put on this earth to preach the gospel of religiosity, blackness or salvation as Min. Paul Scott would have it. N.W.A. spoke the truth and framed the truth according to their small world-view. How could they possibly be the blame for what ails black America?

The idea that groups such as N.W.A. were allowed to thrive to counter the consciousness and revolutionary ideas of Public Enemy and the like is far-fetched. I’ve seen the YouTube video about the secret meeting to destroy hip-hop and it’s about as lame as Flava Flav being part of the Illuminati! You Negroes hold yourselves waaay too impotent important in the grand scheme of conspiracy theories (and this is coming from a conspiracy theorist.)

If Min. Paul Scott wants to lay the blame of ghetto erosion on anyone, perhaps he might start with our government. They create the environments & circumstances whereby black men find themselves afoul of the law—not N.W.A. or rap music. With everything I’ve got, I hate the FOX News posturing of Minista Paul Scott and what he brings to the revolutionary game! He might not go see “Straight Outta Compton,” but I betcha he’ll catch it on Netflix! Long live N.W.A.!

Khalil Amani, a Negus with pen-game and a love for hip-hop, even that gangsta, gangsta ish! Follow on IG, Facebook, Twitter. Or check for him in DJ Kayslay’s Straight Stuntin Magazine.

Filed under: Editorial Tagged: DJ Yella, Dr. Dre, eazy-e, ice cube, MC Ren, N.W.A.
AllHipHop

Biopic ‘Straight Outta Compton’ Tells The Epic Story Of Hip-Hop And N.W.A

The original members of N.W.A produced the film, which opens nationwide Friday. Like the group’s story, the making of Straight Outta Compton — which took 11 years — is filled with drama.

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Hip-Hop : NPR
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Straight Outta Compton – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton  artwork

Straight Outta Compton

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 6.99

Release Date: August 7, 1988

© ℗ 1988 Priority Records LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

N.W.A. Greatest Hits – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - N.W.A. Greatest Hits  artwork

N.W.A. Greatest Hits

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: July 2, 1996

© ℗ Compilation 2002 Priority Records, LLC. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Priority Records, LLC,

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Is Eminem Going on Tour With Dr. Dre and Ice Cube as an Honorary N.W.A Member?! Get the Scoop!

Is Eminem going to hit the stage as part of N.W.A?!

Dr. Dre and Ice Cube may team up with Slim Shady, who will serve as an honorary member of their famous rap group from the late…


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Dr. Dre, Ice Cube Break Silence on N.W.A Movie, Suge Knight’s Murder Charge and a Reunion Tour (With Eminem)


This isn’t your dad’s N.W.A: Dre is now 50 and a mogul, Cube is 46 and a Hollywood powerhouse. And yeah, the guys who sang “F— tha Police” and “One Less Bitch” have been married for decades. So what’s left after you poked mainstream America out of its race slumber 30 years ago? The hot biopic ‘Straight Outta Compton’: “All this shit really happened.”

read more


Hollywood Reporter

The Best of N.W.A: The Strength of Street Knowledge – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - The Best of N.W.A: The Strength of Street Knowledge  artwork

The Best of N.W.A: The Strength of Street Knowledge

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: December 26, 2006

© ℗ 2006 Priority Records, LLC. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Priority Records, LLC,

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Straight Outta Compton (Expanded Edition) [Remastered 2002] – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton (Expanded Edition) [Remastered 2002]  artwork

Straight Outta Compton (Expanded Edition) [Remastered 2002]

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: August 7, 1988

© ℗ 2002 Priority Records, LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Ice Cube: N.W.A. changed society

Ice Cube has spoken about what it will be like reuniting with his seminal hip hop group N.W.A. at the BET Awards this weekend, 15 years after their last concert performance.
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N.W.A. Greatest Hits (World) – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - N.W.A. Greatest Hits (World)  artwork

N.W.A. Greatest Hits (World)

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: July 2, 1996

© ℗ Compilation 2002 Priority Records, LLC. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Priority Records, LLC,

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Straight Outta Compton (2002 Remaster) – N.W.A.

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton (2002 Remaster)  artwork

Straight Outta Compton (2002 Remaster)

N.W.A.

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 6.99

Release Date: August 7, 1988

© ℗ 2002 Priority Records, LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Dr. Dre Talks N.W.A Biopic, Eazy-E’s Death, Eminem and Making New Music

Dr. Dre recently sat down with L.A. radio DJ Big Boy for a wide-ranging chat, discussing everything from his beginnings in N.W.A to producing Eminem. He spoke at length his involvement in the upcoming N.W.A biopic Straight Outta Compton. “We want to show the heart of the guys and everything we…
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