Rammstein: In Amerika – Documentaries – Rammstein

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Rammstein: In Amerika – Documentaries

Rammstein

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: January 1, 2015


"Rammstein in Amerika" tells the story of this unique band through the prism of the cultural exchange its members have had with the world's pre-eminent superpower. Home movies and private photos going back to the 1980s take us behind the Iron Curtain to the bands whose members would one day fuse to create Rammstein, while eye-opening behind-the-scenes footage, interviews and incredible concert excerpts from across the years are woven together to tell their amazing tale. We hear from the record execs, PR men, agents and promoters that thought Rammstein could never make it in America, and who lived to eat their words. The key to Rammstein's success was the overwhelming shock and awe of their live show, a pyrotechnic extravaganza so intense that, to this day, the band can't play within the city limits of Chicago due to rules dating back to the great fire of 1871. Rammstein aficionado Kiefer Sutherland puts their challenging American journey in context, and the film is peppered with tributes and anecdotes from other famous fans: Iggy Pop, Steven Tyler, Marilyn Manson, Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, Moby, Chad Smith (Red Hot Chili Peppers) and many more. "Rammstein in Amerika" is an improbable but ultimately triumphant love story, fraught with adversity, misunderstanding and a heartening amount of cultural give and take. It's a tale of Eastblock otherness in the American heartlands, of an industry that loves categorisation being invaded by a band that love to confuse, polarise and make people think – that have no qualms about presenting electronica and homoerotica to a rock crowd not famous for tolerating either, and getting arrested for their troubles. "Rammstein in Amerika" offers an all-access window onto this trans-Atlantic rock'n'roll odyssey. By turns naive, touching and wild, it is a story of an artistic communion with the fans that transcends all cultural barriers, of thunderous music and, of course, of fire. "Making of Liebe Ist Fur Alle Da" is a short film about the making of Rammstein's Liebe Ist Fur Alle Da album. In 2008, after taking an unprecedented year off, the members of Rammstein reconvened on a hilltop in Sonoma in northern California to start work on what would become their "Liebe Ist Fur Alle Da" album. This 21-minute film tells the inside story of those sessions.

© © 2015 RAMMSTEIN GBR under exclusive license to Vertigo/Capitol, a division of Universal Music GmbH

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Rammstein: In Amerika – Live From Madison Square Garden – Rammstein

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Rammstein: In Amerika – Live From Madison Square Garden

Rammstein

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: January 1, 2015


From the bone-crunching noise they make to the sexual sedition and craftily choreographed ultraviolence of their imagery, industrial rock giants Rammstein tirelessly court controversy and refuse to entertain the merest notion of compromise. They sing only in German, confuse and confound with relish and laugh at the hypocrisy of the guardians of taste. And yet, despite or because of this, they have become one of the biggest acts on the planet. Now, from one of the most extraordinary bands in rock, comes one of the most extraordinary rock films. The stunning 102-minute concertfilm includes the entirety of Rammstein's legendary concert at New York's Madison Square Garden on December 11th 2010, the show that sold out in 20 minutes and marked the band's live return to the States after a ten-year absence.

© © 2015 RAMMSTEIN GBR under exclusive license to Vertigo/Capitol, a division of Universal Music GmbH

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RAMMSTEIN: PARIS – Rammstein

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RAMMSTEIN: PARIS

Rammstein

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: January 1, 2017


Catching the excitement of a spectacular concert on film is an almost impossible task. All the senses are stimulated at live events in a way that can't be replicated onscreen. Director Jonas Akerlund's extraordinary film RAMMSTEIN: PARIS is the closest anyone has ever come to cracking this dilemma. His creative rendition of the all-new stage production they delivered at Paris Bercy in March 2012 takes the art form to a whole new level, capturing the rush and grandeur of Rammstein live the way the band has always deserved. The look this time is sweaty, grimy gothic veering off into Grand Guignol, a technical tour de force that captivates you even before the music has started, as the titles flicker by like an electronic malfunction to the sinister hisses and sighs of the industrial stage set. Steam and light pulsate to a dystopian beat, a flaming torch parts the crowd, and the hooded band march ritualistically through the audience to the stage via an elevated gantry, ratcheting-up the tension. Anyone who can tease the crowd for this long is confident of delivering, and Rammstein do so in spades. As the grinding lurch of Sonne mutates into Wollt Ihr Das Bett In Flammen Sehen, fireballs shoot skywards from the guitarists' lapels, and soon Till's flaming hands are windmilling, smoke seeping from his nose and mouth as he sings. In Feuer Frei! three of the musicians have fire shooting out of their faces, the guitars burst into flames at the end of Du Riechst So Gut, and the boomeranging fireworks Till shoots over the crowd during Du Hast have to be seen to be believed. We've all seen concert films edited so headache-inducingly fast that you can't see anything properly. Akerlund's genius here is his ability to cut the action at a breathless pace which leaves you feeling exhilarated not disorientated. Like the car crash sequences in The Bourne Ultimatum, the variety of camera angles and frenetic speed with which they assault you leaves you feeling not so much dazed as, well – like you are really there. As they thrash though Asche Zu Asche, you realize that the lens through which we're seeing Rammstein has become a seventh band member. There are strange colors, textures, kaleidoscopic visual effects, distressed overhead crowd shots that look like insects, hallucinatory dissolves of flailing band members and unsettling flash frames like Till's intermittently satanic black eyes and forked tongue, fanged creatures cavorting in the crowd and electric lightning striking Flake's keyboards like a scene from Frankenstein's laboratory. This is a new kind of concert film, the live experience enhanced – as no one in the hall would have seen it. Most bands use the B stage at the other end of the hall for an acoustic interlude. Not Rammstein. As Richard Kruspe unleashes ominous electro beats from a keyboard, the rest of the band are whipped to the podium on their knees like groveling submissives by dressed-in-drag drummer Christoph Schneider for a version of Buck Dich that raises the tempo to fire alarm levels, its explosive conclusion echoing the version that got them arrested in America. But there is tenderness too, even a moment when the band stands in silence on the B stage smiling at the audience surrounding them, soaking up the love. A concert film is never the same as being at a concert, but RAMMSTEIN: PARIS is the perfect fusion of the band's extraordinary stage show with the film editor's craft. It is a visual feast, a celebration of Rammstein live that is both different to and in some ways better than being there – and a definite contender for the best concert film of all time.

© © 2017 RAMMSTEIN GBR under exclusive license to Vertigo/Capitol, a division of Universal Music GmbH

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