Transmission (The Invasion Chronicles—Book One): A Science Fiction Thriller – Morgan Rice

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Transmission (The Invasion Chronicles—Book One): A Science Fiction Thriller

Morgan Rice

Genre: Science Fiction

Publish Date: June 19, 2018

Publisher: Morgan Rice

Seller: Lukeman Literary Management


“TRANSMISSION is riveting, unexpected, and firmly rooted in strong psychological profiles backed with thriller and sci-fi elements: what more could readers wish for? (Just the quick publication of Book Two, Arrival.)” –Midwest Book Review The #1 Bestseller! From #1 worldwide bestselling fantasy author Morgan Rice comes a long-anticipated science fiction series debut. When SETI finally receives a signal from an alien civilization, what will happen next? A 13 year old boy, dying of a rare brain disease, is the only one able to hear and decode signals from outer space. SETI confirms it is a real signal. What is the message? How will the world react?  And most of all: are the aliens coming? “Action-packed …. Rice’s writing is solid and the premise intriguing.” –Publishers Weekly, re A Quest of Heroes “A superior fantasy… A recommended winner for any who enjoy epic fantasy writing fueled by powerful, believable young adult protagonists.” –Midwest Book Review, re Rise of the Dragons “An action packed fantasy sure to please fans of Morgan Rice’s previous novels, along with fans of works such as THE INHERITANCE CYCLE by Christopher Paolini…. Fans of Young Adult Fiction will devour this latest work by Rice and beg for more.” –The Wanderer, A Literary Journal (regarding Rise of the Dragons) Book #2 in the series—ARRIVAL—is also available! Also available are Morgan Rice’s many series in the fantasy genre, including A QUEST OF HEROES (BOOK #1 IN THE SORCERER’S RING), a free download with over 1,300 five star reviews!

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Dot Physics: The science behind electric cars

Dot Physics’ Rhett Allain breaks down the physical forces that allow electric cars to drive.
WIRED Videos

Tech Support – Bill Nye, Neil DeGrasse Tyson and More Answer Science Questions from Twitter | Tech Support

Bill Nye, James Cameron, Ken Jeong, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and neuroscientist Anil Seth answer the most interesting science questions from Twitter. Do your guts float in space? Do aliens exist? Can you punch specific memories out of your brain? What exactly is a tractor beam? If humans evolved from monkeys, why are there still monkeys?
WIRED Videos

Tech Support – Bill Nye Answers Even More Science Questions From Twitter

Bill Nye uses the power of Twitter to answer even more science questions. How does the internet work? What’s the difference between a meteor, meteorite, and an asteroid? Does anyone really know how gravity works? Is water wet? Bill answers all these questions and more!
WIRED Videos

The Swoly Bible: The Bro Science Way of Life (Unabridged) – Dom Mazzetti

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The Swoly Bible: The Bro Science Way of Life (Unabridged)

Dom Mazzetti

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 17.95

Publish Date: December 20, 2016

© ℗ © 2016 Penguin Audio

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Science Just Found a Potential Cure for Baldness

Hair-challenged men of the world may have a reason to celebrate in the future: Researchers have found what they think could be a possible cure for baldness.

The post Science Just Found a Potential Cure for Baldness appeared first on Men's Journal.

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

Dot Physics: The science behind electric cars

Dot Physics’ Rhett Allain breaks down the physical forces that allow electric cars to drive.
WIRED Videos

Nick Jonas’ Hot Aussie Chick Revealed, She Blinded Him with Science

Nick Jonas’ hot Australian mystery chick is a mystery no more — and she’s not just a smoke show, she’s a smart one. TMZ has learned her name is Annalisa Azaredo, and she lives in Sydney … where Nick’s currently on vacay with his brother, Joe. She’s…

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Rocket science: Chris Paul is thriving in Houston while Isaiah Thomas struggles in Cleveland

Chris Paul and Isaiah Thomas were traded to their respective teams last offseason, and Paul had another strong performance at Thomas’ expense.
www.espn.com – NBA

Cooking For Stepmom And Science Experiment

I cannot believe this horrible day. First, I have to fire some morons at work then I have to come home and cook dinner since my chef is sick. My lazy, no good for nothing stepson is always playing video games and jacking his dick. I don’t even know where anything is at in the kitchen. I called my stepson in to help me but when he walked in I noticed his raging hard on and cum stains all over his shorts. You little pervert! I will tell you what, if you cook dinner, I will take care of that raging boner. I have a huge project due tomorrow for school. I was done setting everything up, but now I just need my partner to arrive so we can test the chemical. I have come up with a chemical that is supposed to make you relax, but I must need to make sure it works. Finally, my partner calls. Are you on your way? What, you cant make it? This project is 50% of our grade! Great, now what am I going to do. I need a test subject. Is that you mom? I’m glad your home, I need a test subject for my science experiment.

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

You little pervert! I will tell you what, if you cook dinner, I will take care of that raging boner. I have a huge project due tomorrow for school.

Stars: Madisin Lee

Categories: High Definition Taboo Reality Based All Sex Natural Breasts Amateur

Scene Number: 2

Orientation: Straight

Studio Name: Taboo Passions

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The Strange Science of Screams

Few sounds grab attention like a scream, but why is that? Scientists have studied the nature of screams and their effects on the brain to better understand the human howl.
WIRED Videos

This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession – Daniel J. Levitin

Daniel J. Levitin - This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession  artwork

This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession

Daniel J. Levitin

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 20.95

Publish Date: August 3, 2007

© ℗ © 2007 Penguin Audio

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The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One – Shane Abbess

Shane Abbess - The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One  artwork

The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One

Shane Abbess

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 6.99

Release Date: October 6, 2017


When a dangerous outbreak threatens to destroy everyone living on a newly colonized planet, Lt. Kane Sommerville goes against orders and leaves his station to rescue his young daughter before it's too late.

© © 2016 Storm Vision Entertainment Pty Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson Answers Science Questions From Twitter

Astrophysicist and ‘StarTalk’ host Neil deGrasse Tyson uses the power of Twitter to answer some common questions about our universe. What is a quark? Is there a limit to the expansion of the universe?

‘StarTalk’ airs Sundays at 11pm on Nat Geo.
WIRED Videos

The Strange Science of the Veggie Burger That Bleeds

It’s called the Impossible Burger and it looks, feels, tastes and smells like ground beef, even though it’s made entirely of plants. It’s all thanks to science and genetically engineered yeast. WIRED explores how close it comes so to the real thing and if it’s 100% safe.

WIRED Videos

Man Dresses as a Car Seat in the Name of Self-Driving Science

A man dressed as a car seat to fool pedestrians and drivers into believing his van was driving itself. It’s hilarious, but it’s all in the name of autonomous vehicle research.
WIRED Videos

The Practice and Science of Drawing – Harold Speed

Harold Speed - The Practice and Science of Drawing  artwork

The Practice and Science of Drawing

Harold Speed

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: December 31, 1872

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


This classic approach to the dynamics of drawing by a brilliant teacher is filled with insights and practical advice on line drawing, mass drawing, visual memory, materials, and much more. Throughout, the author offers historical backgrounds and specific exercises. 84 plates and diagrams reinforce Speed's clear presentation.

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Bill Nye the Science Guy Sues Disney for Shorting His Back-End Profits

Bill Nye the Science Guy is having a bad reaction to his old TV partners at Disney, which is why he’s suing them for $ 9 million! Bill filed docs Thursday in L.A., saying Disney — which marketed and distributed his show — cut him a check in 2008 for…

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Science Fiction – Brand New

Brand New - Science Fiction  artwork

Science Fiction

Brand New

Genre: Alternative

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: August 19, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Procrastinate! Music Traitors

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Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction (Unabridged) – Derek Thompson

Derek Thompson - Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction (Unabridged)  artwork

Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction (Unabridged)

Derek Thompson

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: February 7, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 Penguin Audio

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Minecraft Ores Help Us Learn Science – Anton Eduardo F. San Juan

Anton Eduardo F. San Juan - Minecraft Ores Help Us Learn Science  artwork

Minecraft Ores Help Us Learn Science

Anton Eduardo F. San Juan

Genre: Games

Publish Date: February 26, 2015

Publisher: CCF Life Academy Foundation Inc.

Seller: CCF Life Academy


This is about Minecraft ores that we can learn in science.  

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How Science Is Hacking the Ultimate Athletes

Through motion tracking, data driven exercise, and eventually DNA analysis, SI and WIRED explore how scientific advances in training may help create the perfect NFL athlete.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

Science Friction WIRED Edition: How to Brainwash Someone

In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Steve Rogers’ sidekick-turned-nemesis undergoes drastic brainwashing to become The Winter Soldier. But is it really possible to completely change someone’s attitudes and beliefs? In this special WIRED edition of Science Friction, host Rusty Ward dives into the science behind brainwashing.

Click here to check out more Science Friction.
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The Science of Pheromones

How does human attraction happen? Is it all about liking each other on a physical and intellectual level? Could something deeper be at play here? Let us discuss the role of pheromones/
Relationships:Dating Articles from EzineArticles.com

This is the most iconic song ever, according to science

Science hath declared that Nirvana’s“Smells Like Teen Spirit” is the most iconic song of all time. The seminal grunge track — a cut from SPIN’s Best Albums of the Past 30 Years, Nevermind — was placed at the top of a list of 50 songs by researchers from Goldsmiths, University of London, according to the Daily Mail. Computer scientist and musician Dr. Mick Grierson examined songs featured in seven ‘all-time best’ …
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

The Light Within Me (A Science Fiction / Fantasy Romance) – Carly Fall

Carly Fall - The Light Within Me (A Science Fiction / Fantasy Romance)  artwork

The Light Within Me (A Science Fiction / Fantasy Romance)

The Six Saviors, no. 1

Carly Fall

Genre: Paranormal

Publish Date: June 15, 2012

Publisher: Carly Fall

Seller: Smashwords


2013 READER'S FAVORITE BRONZE MEDAL BOOK AWARD WINNER When Abby and Noah meet, there is an explosive attraction between them that neither can deny… As a shy, awkward, social misfit, Abby has gone her whole life feeling as though she's different from everyone else and she simply doesn't fit in well with society as a whole. She longs to feel a real connection with someone, and she finally does when she meets Noah. Unbeknownst to Abby, Noah is from another world and his sole purpose is to hunt down the evil of his people that was unleashed on Earth hundreds of years ago. He's certain he isn't going to be able to return to his home, and anger and the need for revenge are his constant companions. His focus has been eradicating the evil and making them pay for taking his life on his world away from him. Noah tries desperately to fight his attraction to Abby so he can keep his focus on his mission. But when Abby gets dragged into the evil and mayhem from Noah's world, he realizes that maybe with Abby he can find a home here on Earth…if he can save her in time. Interview with the Author Q – So, what makes the Six Saviors series special? A – It's a mix of things, really. When I set out to write these books, I wanted to create something that mirrored exactly the kind of books I like to read, yet I wanted to create something a little different. I love reading paranormal romance bestsellers, as well as fantasy and sci-fi romance best sellers. The Six Savior books are a great mix of these genres. You'll find the series focuses on the fantasy / sci-fi romance genre with a little paranormal activity thrown in. There is also some action and adventure as well to keep the stories interesting. Overall, the Six Saviors series is designed to keep you turning the pages – and I've made sure there's never a dull moment until everyone gets their happily ever after. Q – What order should I read the books in? A – I’ve written the series so you can read the books in any order, and all the story threads will tie up nicely by the time you're finished. If you do want to read them in order, I'd suggest the following sequence: The Light Within Me (free sci-fi/fantasy romance) Finding My Faith REBORN Beverly’s Rebirth Destiny’s Shift Tangled Fates The Dream Walker Atonement Q – So, why should readers give these books a try? A – Because each book in the Six Saviors series focuses on one of the warriors, and all are alpha males who meet their match when they finally meet their mates. There is humor, action and adventure, and of course, romance. All books have hit the top ten best sellers in their categories, and all have received rave reviews. Ultimately, readers who enjoy sci-fi/fantasy romance with action and adventure will enjoy the Six Saviors. Six Saviors Series eBook Categories: – Paranormal Romance detective – Alien Romance Mates – Action and Adventure Romance Series – Alien Romance Series – Romance Suspense in audiobooks – Fantasy Romance free – Urban fantasy romance

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Prediction: According to Science These Ladies Are Going to Be the Next Supermodels

Gone are the days of a gorgeous face, stunning body, and winning attitude being enough to propel you into stratospheric supermodel heights (like the level where you get sweatshirts made in your honor). These days,…


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Why Do They Hate Science So Much?

I love science more than you do. I would have sex with science if it let me. Sometimes I worship science. It has earned my trust, unlike whatever absurdities other people believe in. I am a man of reason.

Sure, science has a few warts. Don’t we all? And remember, science is more of a journey toward truth than a destination. We expect corrections along the way. Those corrections are an essential part of the scientific journey to truth. 

We know the scientific method is the best method because it was invented by Sir Isaac Newton, the same man who invented calculus, when he wasn’t conjuring gold using alchemy. But he also got several things right, including inventing gravity. Imagine no gravity, right?

I love science because it makes me smarter reading about all the results and stuff. And by that I am not talking about definitely smarter. One has no way of knowing for sure when science is done unfolding its mysteries. So until the train reaches its destination of truth – and no one really knows for sure when, or if, that will happen – we have to accept some doubt along the way. That is how rational people think. Not morons. Morons are dumb.

And so it pisses me off when people start saying that the knowledge I have been receiving at the altar of science since I was a wee boy, especially in the field of psychological research, is mostly brainwashing and bullshit, only slightly more credible than a horoscope. Why do the morons hate science? Is it a moron thing?

For context, I am guessing that dumb ol’ horoscopes, being general in nature, are accurate only about 25% of the time, by luck. Science obviously beats that. By a mile. Duh.

To back up my point, check out this article showing charts and graphs. I believe statistics and whatnot are involved. And variables. I don’t have time to get into the weeds of it. The point is that I have a preconceived notion, and I pointed you to a link, so I think we are done here. 

Scott

Buy my book because I love science. More than you do.


Scott Adams Blog

Weird Science – John Hughes

John Hughes - Weird Science  artwork

Weird Science

John Hughes

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: August 2, 1985


The Frankenstein legend takes an uproarious twist in this outrageous special effects-laden comedy from the writer-director of Sixteen Candles and The Breakfast Club. Critically acclaimed filmmaker John Hughes is at it again, giving nerdy computer whiz Ilan Mitchell-Smith and his best friend, Anthony Michael Hall, power to create the "perfect woman" (Kelly LeBrock). Like a computer-generated fairy godmother, the duo's out-of-this-world creation guides the pair through the pleasures and pitfalls of adolescence. With a rock beat supplied by many music superstars including Oingo Boingo, this far-out, sci-fi fable brings everyone's favorite teen fantasies to life through the miracle of Weird Science.

© © 1985 Universal City Studios, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Matt Damon: How ‘The Martian’ Stays Grounded In Science

Matt Damon tells Access’ Scott ‘Movie’ Mantz how ‘The Martian’ stays true to the book and remains grounded in science.


Access Hollywood Latest Videos

Science Test

My wife was grading a science test at home that she had given to her elementary-school class and was reading some of the results to me.

The subject was the human body, and the first question was: “Name one of the major functions of your skin.”

One child wrote: “To keep people who look at you from throwing up.”

Received from Da Mouse Tracks.
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Booze Science | Ice

Booze Science is better drinking through chemistry. WIRED articles editor Adam Rogers explores the scientific ways ice can influence a cocktail with Jennifer Colliau, beverage director at San Francisco’s innovative bar The Interval at The Long Now.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

Minecraft Ores Help Us Learn Science – Anton Eduardo F. San Juan

Anton Eduardo F. San Juan - Minecraft Ores Help Us Learn Science  artwork

Minecraft Ores Help Us Learn Science

Anton Eduardo F. San Juan

Genre: Games

Publish Date: February 26, 2015

Publisher: CCF Life Academy Foundation Inc.

Seller: CCF Life Academy


This is about Minecraft ores that we can learn in science.  

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H.G. Wells Science Fiction Collection (Unabridged) – H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells - H.G. Wells Science Fiction Collection (Unabridged)  artwork

H.G. Wells Science Fiction Collection (Unabridged)

H.G. Wells

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 2.95

Publish Date: July 13, 2012

© ℗ © 2012 Trout Lake Media

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The Science of Sparklers

An amazing mix of chemistry and physics makes it possible to hold lit sparklers which can burn at temperatures as hot as 3000 degrees Fahrenheit.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

How ‘Inside Out’ Nailed The Science Of Kids’ Emotions

When UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner attended the Hollywood premiere of the new Pixar movie Inside Out—which opened yesterday in theaters nationwide—he was thrilled to see children running around the purple (not red) carpet yelling, “I’m Fear,” “I’m Sadness” or “I want to be Anger.”

Kids typically don’t like to identify, let alone broadcast, difficult feelings, including the ones that loom large inside the head of the movie’s central character, 11-year-old Riley, as she struggles with her family’s relocation from Minnesota to San Francisco.

So a movie like Inside Out, which explains how positive and negative emotions can bump up against each other and yet also team up to solve a problem, can be empowering for both children and adults, as Keltner witnessed at its debut.
“I hope this movie becomes part of our cultural understanding of what it means to be a child and what it means to be a human being and to grapple with these emotions,” Keltner says.

An expert on the science of emotions, Keltner served as a consultant on the movie, visiting Pixar’s Emeryville campus a half-dozen times to explain the basis, physiology, and purpose of emotions, and exchanging many emails.

“They were really interested in what happens with memory. How does my sadness right now color my recollection of my childhood? Keltner says.

The insights that Keltner and his mentor, psychologist Paul Ekman, provided helped to flesh out the animated personifications of Joy, voiced by Amy Poehler, Anger, by Lewis Black, Fear, by Bill Hader, Disgust, by Mindy Kaling and Sadness, by Phyllis Smith.

Filmmakers grappled with the purpose of sadness, but Keltner set them straight.

“In our culture, we’re tough on sadness, but it’s a powerful trigger for seeking comfort and bonding,” Keltner says. “Meanwhile, anger is often about the sense of being treated unfairly, and can be a motivator for social change.”

Keltner met Inside Out director Pete Docter, who also directed Pixar’s Up and Monsters Inc., when their daughters were at various stages of puberty. They bonded over the travails of parenting during those volatile years.

“When they get to their preteens and early teens, it’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner says. “One of the most precipitous drops in happiness occurs around 13.”

Their discussions eventually evolved into Inside Out, the results of which have exceeded Keltner’s wildest expectations: “I was blown away,” he says. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like it.”

Keltner, who has taught psychology at Berkeley since 1996, posits that everyone has a “signature emotion”—just like Inside Out’s Riley, who leans toward joy—but it evolves over the course of a lifetime.

In Keltner’s case, for example, the signature emotion during his youth was contempt, he says, which turned to fear and anxiety in adulthood, and has more recently evolved into compassion. Eventually, he’d like his signature emotion to be contentment.

As for how all the emotions roiling in Riley’s head coordinate with her intrinsic sense of joy, he says: “You’re just going to have to watch the movie and find out.”

For more from Dacher Keltner, read his book, “Born to Be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life.”

This article first appeared on Greater Good, the online magazine of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley.

More:
How Pixar Picked the 5 Core Emotions of Inside Out’s Star (Wired)
Science Of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right (NPR)

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Dr. Phil – The Huffington Post

How ‘Inside Out’ Nailed The Science Of Kids’ Emotions

When UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner attended the Hollywood premiere of the new Pixar movie Inside Out—which opened yesterday in theaters nationwide—he was thrilled to see children running around the purple (not red) carpet yelling, “I’m Fear,” “I’m Sadness” or “I want to be Anger.”

Kids typically don’t like to identify, let alone broadcast, difficult feelings, including the ones that loom large inside the head of the movie’s central character, 11-year-old Riley, as she struggles with her family’s relocation from Minnesota to San Francisco.

So a movie like Inside Out, which explains how positive and negative emotions can bump up against each other and yet also team up to solve a problem, can be empowering for both children and adults, as Keltner witnessed at its debut.
“I hope this movie becomes part of our cultural understanding of what it means to be a child and what it means to be a human being and to grapple with these emotions,” Keltner says.

An expert on the science of emotions, Keltner served as a consultant on the movie, visiting Pixar’s Emeryville campus a half-dozen times to explain the basis, physiology, and purpose of emotions, and exchanging many emails.

“They were really interested in what happens with memory. How does my sadness right now color my recollection of my childhood? Keltner says.

The insights that Keltner and his mentor, psychologist Paul Ekman, provided helped to flesh out the animated personifications of Joy, voiced by Amy Poehler, Anger, by Lewis Black, Fear, by Bill Hader, Disgust, by Mindy Kaling and Sadness, by Phyllis Smith.

Filmmakers grappled with the purpose of sadness, but Keltner set them straight.

“In our culture, we’re tough on sadness, but it’s a powerful trigger for seeking comfort and bonding,” Keltner says. “Meanwhile, anger is often about the sense of being treated unfairly, and can be a motivator for social change.”

Keltner met Inside Out director Pete Docter, who also directed Pixar’s Up and Monsters Inc., when their daughters were at various stages of puberty. They bonded over the travails of parenting during those volatile years.

“When they get to their preteens and early teens, it’s like the world crashes down on them,” Keltner says. “One of the most precipitous drops in happiness occurs around 13.”

Their discussions eventually evolved into Inside Out, the results of which have exceeded Keltner’s wildest expectations: “I was blown away,” he says. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like it.”

Keltner, who has taught psychology at Berkeley since 1996, posits that everyone has a “signature emotion”—just like Inside Out’s Riley, who leans toward joy—but it evolves over the course of a lifetime.

In Keltner’s case, for example, the signature emotion during his youth was contempt, he says, which turned to fear and anxiety in adulthood, and has more recently evolved into compassion. Eventually, he’d like his signature emotion to be contentment.

As for how all the emotions roiling in Riley’s head coordinate with her intrinsic sense of joy, he says: “You’re just going to have to watch the movie and find out.”

For more from Dacher Keltner, read his book, “Born to Be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life.”

This article first appeared on Greater Good, the online magazine of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley.

More:
How Pixar Picked the 5 Core Emotions of Inside Out’s Star (Wired)
Science Of Sadness And Joy: ‘Inside Out’ Gets Childhood Emotions Right (NPR)

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Dr. Phil – The Huffington Post

News in Brief: Frustrated Republicans Argue Pope Should Leave Science To Scientists Who Deny Climate Change

WASHINGTON—In response to a 184-page papal encyclical that urges immediate action to address the environmental and social consequences of global warming, a coalition of frustrated Republican leaders issued statements Thursday arguing that Pope Francis should leave scientific matters to scientists who deny climate change. “Frankly, it’s not really anyone’s place to make declarations about climate science or global temperature changes unless they’re a scientific expert who has spent years rejecting the concept of climate change,” said former Florida governor Jeb Bush, who added that the pope had neither studied climate science nor ever been among the 3 percent of researchers who stand in opposition to the overwhelmingly dominant position held by the scientific community on climate change, so he had no business speaking on the subject. “Personally, I would never trust anyone as an authority on climate change unless they had done years of research and …





The Onion

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How video game companies are making a science of turning your data into profit
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Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning (Unabridged) – Gary Marcus

Gary Marcus - Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning (Unabridged)  artwork

Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning (Unabridged)

Gary Marcus

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 20.95

Publish Date: January 19, 2012

© ℗ © 2012 Penguin Audio

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Exclusive: The Science of Interstellar – WIRED

How director, Christopher Nolan, and physicist, Kip Thorne, combined CG effects and scientific reality to create the most accurate visualization of a black hole in film history.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

The Science of Jurassic World

Jurassic World, which opens today, is a terrific film — as good as the previous three in the franchise, including the first. I saw it in 3D, so my comparison is with the previous 2D versions, and it really comes to life in this format. But such dimensional matters aside, the plot is feasible enough to enable even the most skeptical viewer to willing suspend disbelief enough to accept the premise as plausible, which is the genetic engineering of a completely new type of dinosaur that never existed in the Jurassic. This was done under the advisement of the most famous dinosaur digger in the world, paleontologist Jack Horner, who has been the science advisor for the film franchise, including this latest installment.

2015-06-12-1434148367-6318294-3047316inlinei3jurassicworldsjackhorneronbringingbackthedinosaur.jpg

I’ve known Jack since the early 1990s when I first helped him dig up a dino on a site in Montana (it’s much harder work to release the fossil treasure embedded in solid rock using dental picks than it appears in the film, in which workers easily brush away loose dirt with a small brush). When I arrived at Horner’s camp I was surprised to come upon a patient historical scientist, sitting cross-legged before a cervical vertebrate from a 140-million year old Apatosaurus (formerly known as Brontosaurus), wondering what to make of it. A reporter from a local paper asked Horner what this discovery meant for the history of dinosaurs. Did it change any of his theories? Where was the head? Was there more than one body at this site? Horner’s answers were consistent with those of the cautious scientist: “I don’t know yet.” “Beats me.” “We need more evidence.” “We’ll have to wait and see.”

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Horner’s scientific thoroughness comes through on screen as the science behind Jurassic World paralleled that of his work on back-engineering a dinosaur from modern bird DNA because, we now know, there is no viable DNA available from the Jurassic period, not even left over inside Jurassic mosquitos embedded in amber, which was the premise of Michael Crichton’s novel and Steven Spielberg’s first film in the franchise, Jurassic Park. Instead, as Jack explained to me in an “in conversation” we had at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles a few days before the film was released, since we know dinosaurs evolved into birds, that means bird DNA contains the remnants of their dino ancestors. As Horner explained in his 2009 book How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn’t Have to be Forever (and in his TED talk on de-extinction), you can turn on dormant genes to get them to build body parts, including a dino-like tail, snout and even teeth. Because of their availability, chickens work well, so Jack intends to build what he calls a “Chickenosaurus.” As he told me, “If we can reinstate ancestral characteristics in a bird to make a dinosaur, you can’t have ancestral characteristics unless you have an ancestor. That is proof of evolution.”

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As if anyone needs proof of evolution. Unfortunately they do, at least in America, so films like Jurassic World serve another purpose of value to those of us concerned about the state of U.S. science education (we’re usually ranked toward the bottom of the most prosperous Western industrialized nations in the world): science education. Subtly, but poignantly, the science of Jurassic World sneaks in evolutionary biology without calling it that. Take Hen’s teeth. We’ve known for decades how to turn on the ancestral genes for teeth in a chicken (see Stephen Jay Gould’s 1983 book Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes), which would be impossible if all creatures were created in one brief burst of genesis six thousand years ago. Instead, genetic engineering is showing us how to find the genetic fossils of animal ancestry. This is now done through transgenics, as Horner explained to me: “If you’re going to try to make a dinosaur, transgenically is as good a way as finding ancestral genes. Transgenic dinosaurs are what we created in Jurassic World. We have a hybrid dinosaur that’s a mixture of several types of dinosaurs, plus mixtures of genes from several types of animals.” The result is one of the most terrifying monsters in monster film history: Indominus Rex, a mix of T-Rex and Velociraptor, with a few other features thrown in for good measure, such as the cuddle fish ability to create camouflage to match nearly any background environment. Horner continued his explanation as I pressed him for details about how realistic any of this is:

We will make the dino-chicken-like animal pretty soon. We’re moving pretty quickly, but making a dinosaur that would look like a Velociraptor would take a lot longer. The more genes we learn about, what they do, and how to turn them on and off, the closer we come.

All birds share a common ancestor. Once we have the technology, we think it’ll work on any bird. Chickens just happen to be the easiest birds to come by.

Jurassic World adds another feature not seen in the franchise before, and that is how to train a dinosaur. The film’s hero employs the techniques used by animal trainers in venues like Sea World, so I asked Jack about this because these training techniques work on mammals. How would they work on reptilian creatures?

We also know dinosaurs were social. For years, we’ve found dinosaur nesting grounds and evidence that they cared for their young. And birds live in social groups. That had to come from somewhere; I don’t think they invented it on their own.

We think of birds and reptiles as separate, but birds are dinosaurs, and therefore, reptiles. If you look at it genetically, crocodiles are closer to birds than lizards.

But would they be intelligent enough to understand trainers’ signals, such as the “click” system popular among Sea World trainers (as featured in the disturbing film Black Fish, about the training of Killer Whales)? Horner continued by puncturing yet another anthropocentrism:

This brings up the whole intelligence thing with dinosaurs and this side of that [evolutionary] tree. We’re so mammal-centric. We think we’re so smart; we’re even mammal-centric about where our brain is located — in our heads.

Dinosaurs not only had a cranial brain, but a pelvic brain, enlarged ganglia that birds also have. If you add together the volume of the brain and ganglia, it’s as high as most mammals. Parrots are really smart and we don’t think of ducks as smart, and their brain/body ratios are about the same.

In the first Jurassic Park film reference is made to a “blood sucking lawyer,” so that made me wonder about the legal aspect of a place like Jurassic World, that services 20,000 customers a day. Horner:

We know that dinosaurs are not that scary. You could have dinosaurs on the Serengeti. As long as you keep your windows up, you could go on safari and look at them. They’re not going to tear open your vehicle to get you.

If you went to Jurassic Park, you’d see a whole bunch of dinosaurs sleeping. Animals also don’t kill for fun. It’s dangerous to kill another animal. You are putting you’re life in danger. You could have Jurassic World at the L.A. Zoo. There’s a lot worse things running up the freeway.

Go see Jurassic World and learn some science, but mostly just have a good adventure because the film delivers that in spades.

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The Complete Science Fiction Sessions – Ornette Coleman

Ornette Coleman - The Complete Science Fiction Sessions  artwork

The Complete Science Fiction Sessions

Ornette Coleman

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 16.99

Release Date: May 1, 2000

© ℗ Originally Recorded 1971, Originally Released 1972, 1982, (P) 1982 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

The Practice and Science of Drawing – Harold Speed

Harold Speed - The Practice and Science of Drawing  artwork

The Practice and Science of Drawing

Harold Speed

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: January 1, 1873

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


This classic approach to the dynamics of drawing by a brilliant teacher is filled with insights and practical advice on line drawing, mass drawing, visual memory, materials, and much more. Throughout, the author offers historical backgrounds and specific exercises. 84 plates and diagrams reinforce Speed's clear presentation.

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The Science of Beautiful Easter Egg Color

There’s a lot of science at work in Easter egg coloring. The dye needs an acid, usually vinegar, to bond with the egg’s shell. WIRED experiments to find the perfect Ph for egg color that pops.
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Science Magazine Officially Retracts That Discredited Gay Marriage Study

Science magazine officially retracted a major study on same-sex marriage and public opinion on Thursday without the consent of the lead author, UCLA graduate student Michael J. LaCour.

The events leading to the retraction became public on May 19, when the article’s second author, Columbia University political science professor Donald Green, issued a request for the retraction based on evidence that the study data were at least in part falsified.

As The Huffington Post reported last week:

The LaCour-Green study had examined the work of activists with the Los Angeles LGBT Center. After California’s gay marriage ban passed in 2008, activists at the center had more than 12,000 one-on-one conversations in Los Angeles neighborhoods with people who overwhelmingly supported the ban. LaCour’s idea was to see if those conversations produced any lasting change. He purportedly designed a randomized experiment to replicate those conversations, with a series of follow-up surveys online to test how the anti-gay voters felt about gay rights and gay marriage over time. Those who were contacted by the openly gay canvassers showed substantially more positive attitudes toward gay marriage as much as nine months later.

But according to a report issued Tuesday [May 19] by two University of California, Berkeley, graduate students and a Yale professor, there are enough questions about the data to warrant retracting the study. Retraction Watch broke the story Wednesday [May 20] about what students David Broockman (soon to be an assistant professor at Stanford) and Joshua Kalla and Yale professor Peter Aronow found.

After the LaCour-Green study was published, Broockman and Kalla were impressed by its findings and wanted to extend the research. In January 2015, they found some patterns in the data that seemed to be too perfect — statistically speaking, there was less variance in the results than there should have been. Some social scientists had noticed this when the study was first published.

As Broockman and Kalla continued their work, they wrote in their report, they uncovered more irregularities. When the pair noticed that their own study had a much lower response rate (the proportion of people contacted who actually respond to a survey), they asked the survey firm that allegedly gathered data for LaCour, Qualtrics, how it achieved such a high response rate. They said the firm replied that it had no record of the project.

This is what happened next according to their report and Green’s letter to Science: The statistical irregularities continued to mount, and the pair recruited Aronow to help with their analysis. … Broockman and Kalla contacted Green. Green said that he had joined the study after the data had been collected and thought that the irregularities Broockman and Kalla had uncovered were, indeed, highly suspicious. Green reached out to LaCour’s adviser at UCLA, professor Lynn Vavreck, and the two of them decided that Vavreck would confront LaCour and ask him to provide his data. Initially, LaCour claimed he had accidentally deleted the file with the necessary information, but again Qualtrics said it could not verify that the data had been deleted or that the study took place. It seemed increasingly clear to Green that no follow-up surveys had ever been conducted and that LaCour may have taken data from existing studies and manipulated the numbers to achieve the results he wanted.

Thursday’s statement from Science Editor-in-Chief Marcia McNutt cites two reasons for retracting the study. First, claims that survey respondents had been given cash payments to participate and refer family and friends to participate in the survey were inaccurate. Second, the funding statement was false. LaCour had misrepresented that funding for the study came from the Williams Institute, the Ford Foundation, and the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund.

McNutt’s statement notes that both of these falsifications have been confirmed by LaCour’s attorney, although it also points out that LaCour does not agree with the retraction.

LaCour did not immediately respond to requests for comment from The Huffington Post, but he has told Science Insider that he will provide a full report in his defense as quickly as possible. His website has a statement that he will respond on or before May 29.

For Jim Key, chief marketing officer for the Los Angeles LGBT Center, which partnered with LaCour and Green on the study, the only upside of the retraction is that researchers will now go out and actually quantify whether the center’s methods are successful.

“We support the retraction and are very happy to be working with other researchers, David Broockman and Josh Kalla, to get accurate data regarding our voter persuasion work,” Key told HuffPost.

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Data Attack – The Female Orgasm, Explained with Science Projects

The male orgasm is an explosive affair, but the female orgasm? Now, that’s a different story. Find out what’s really going down when a woman gets off.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

‘Bill Nye The Science Guy’ Is Now On Netflix; Cue Nostalgic Binge-Watching

Stop the presses and return home immediately: “Bill Nye the Science Guy” is now on Netflix. We repeat, “Bill Nye the Science Guy” is now on Netflix.

Social media has been abuzz this week with the news that several episodes of the beloved science show had landed on Netflix, where they are now available for streaming.

Bill Nye the Science Guy” first aired on PBS Kids between 1993 and 1998. Currently, 30 episodes of the show — out of 100 — are available online. Episodes include “Gravity,” “Digestion” and “Pollution Solutions.”

As The Daily Dot points out, some of the science covered in the show is now outdated. For instance, Pluto is no longer a planet (thanks in part to Nye’s friend and collaborator Neil de Grasse Tyson); and the human genome had yet to be mapped.

Still, Nye’s show remains informative and fun — and it’ll certainly suffuse you with plenty of nostalgia.

Commence the Bill Nye bingewatching here.

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Miles from Tomorrowland is getting Disney Junior viewers excited about the science that powers space flight

So how does Sascha Paladino — the creator and exec producer of Disney Junior’s Miles from Tomorrowland — measure the amount of time & energy that he’s poured into the development of this popular new animated series? Oddly enough, Sascha doesn’t use miles as his unit of measure. But — rather — the ages of his twin boys.

“Back when I first pitched Miles to Disney Channel executives, my sons were only three months old,” Paladino recalled during a recent phone interview. “By the time that our very first episode debuted on Disney Junior last month, my sons had just turned five. So this show’s journey from original concept to finished product took — what? — 4 & 3/4rds years? Wow.”

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And why exactly did it take so long for Miles from Tomorrowland to move through Disney’s development pipeline? Because Sascha was looking to do something genuinely ambitious with this animated series. Which was find ways to get pre-schoolers excited about the science & technology that makes space flight possible.

“When I and the Miles development team were still in the research phase for this Disney Junior show, we got to visit NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena. We also got to tour that privately funded space company, SpaceX. And you know what we learned as we talked with the rocket scientists who worked at these places? That they were all inspired to pursue the jobs that they have today because of the movies & the TV shows that they had watched when they were kids. Programs like Star Trek and films like Star Wars, ” Paladino continued. “That’s when we realized how important Miles could actually be in the long run. Which is when we became determined to make this Disney Junior show as entertaining & informative as it could possibly be when it came to explaining the science that powers space flight.”

Mind you, given that the target demographic for Disney Junior is kids 2 – 5, putting together a new animated series that would then try and explain key scientific concepts & principles to pre-schoolers in an entertaining way initially seemed … Well, impossible. But Sascha and his team persevered.

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“I won’t lie to you. There were days during the development process where working on Miles felt like we were juggling flaming knives. I mean, our goals for this show were multi-fold. We were trying — above all — to be entertaining. But at the same time, we wanted to introduce kids to aspects of the sciences in a non-didactic way. And if that wasn’t already a tough enough nut to crack, we also wanted Miles to be very much be in the grand tradition of Disney storytelling. Which meant that this new Disney Junior show had to have great characters with lots of humor & heart,” Paladino explained.

As I noted at the top of this article, it took a number of years to get the balance of elements just right. But in the end, Sascha & Co. came up with the Callisto clan. This family of space travelers — Mother / Captain Phoebe, Father / Engineer Leo, 7 year-old Miles and his big sister Loretta — who all work for the Tomorrowland Transit Authority, this galactic transportation corporation which is determined to connect the universe through science & technology.

“And what’s great about this set-up is that — because each episode of Miles from Tomorrowland is then made up of two 11 minute-long stories — as Miles and his family explore strange new worlds, we then get to take our young viewers on an adventure which features at least one space flight-based or science fact per episode. Take — for example — our ‘Journey to the Frozen Planet’ episode — where we talked about exoplanets. Which are these planets that exist outside of the solar system,” Paladino stated.

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“Journey to the Frozen Planet” is actually an excellent example of what a truly difficult juggling act Miles from Tomorrowland can sometimes be. Especially since this particular episode tries to get across the importance of two distinctly different scientific principles within the confines of a single 11 minute-long story.

“What we were looking to do with ‘Journey’ was demonstrate to our viewers that while — when it comes to science — it’s usually crucial to follow instructions exactly, it’s also equally important to sometimes think outside the box,” Sascha said. “Now you’d think — given that this animated series is being put together by artistic types like animators, designers & writers — that this episode would then come down on the ‘Think-outside-of-the-box’ side of the fence. But that’s where you’d be wrong. Because when it comes to science, you really do need to follow the rules or you’re probably not going to get the outcome that you were looking for. So the real challenge with ‘Journey’ was to give equal weight to both sides of this argument.”

Given that some of the subject matter that Miles was going to deal with did sound awfully dry, Paladino knew that he needed a top notch cast of voice actors to put this material across. Which is why one of the very first people Sascha hired for this Disney Junior show was Tom Kenny of SpongeBob Squarepants fame.

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“But given that — when we produce TV shows here at Disney — we want to make sure that these programs are not only entertaining for kids but also have something for Mom & Dad … Well, we thought that it might be fun to include some performers from the Star Trek & Star Wars universes to help round out our vocal cast,” Sascha enthused. “Which is why we reached out to people like Mark Hamill, George Takei and Wil Wheaton. We even got Bill Nye the Science Guy to come voice a character on this show.”

“And what I really love about being able to do that is since it was these performers that helped inspire the current generation of scientists who are now pursuing goals like space tourism and the first hotel in space. Which — if what the folks at SpaceX told us proves to be true — that’s in our immediate future. We’re just four years or so away from that long-held dream becoming a reality,” Paladino continued. “And if we’ve done our job correctly with Miles … Well, who knows what the future generation of scientists — who hopefully will be inspired by our show — will then be able to accomplish?”

And speaking of accomplishments … Given that Miles from Tomorrowland — when it debuted on Disney Junior back on February 6th — reached 2 million unique viewers and 697,000 children ages 2 to 5, eventually becoming that week’s No. 3 cable TV series among kids ages 2 through 8, it’s clear that Sascha & Co. created something that really resonated with this show’s target audience. More to the point, Disney Stores across the country are reporting that they’re having trouble keeping up with consumer demand for Miles from Tomorrowland-related merchandise. Which suggests that the Mouse may now have a new sci-fi hit on its hands.

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So if you’d like to check out the program that’s getting pre-schoolers all excited about the science that powers space flight, the Disney Channel is staging a Miles from Tomorrowland programming event this morning. Where — starting at 9 a.m. ET / PT — they’ll be airing three full episodes of this new animated series back-to-back.
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Science Fails Again (to communicate) on Gender Issues

As a clarification, I have little interest in the politics of gender discrimination in the workplace. But the psychology of it fascinates me like few things have. 

I doubt I have seen worse arguments on both sides of an issue. Most people identify as either a man or a woman, so the “my team” problem overwhelms our rational capacity. No one, including me, can come anywhere near objectivity on this issue. So how do you make rational decisions on a topic in which no human has even the slightest potential to be rational?

I like the challenge. And few people would be reckless enough to go where I plan to go on this. 

Every time I see an article on the Internet about gender issues in the workplace, I see these two opposing comments:

1. There are many studies that show gender bias. For example, teachers give better grades on math tests to male students, but the difference vanishes when the tests have no name on them. Sheryl Sandberg’s book, Lean In, has lots of references to similar study results, or so I hear. And Vivian Giang got some of you riled up with examples here

2. Another set of folks (all men) invariably point me to studies that suggest there is no pay difference between men and women once you adjust for experience and time on the job. And I hear there are studies saying there is no difference for younger women just entering the workplace.

How can both views be true?

So I declare a link war. 

I appoint myself the judge in this contest. Give me links to studies that support your point of view. I will assess those studies and pick a winner. Or I might declare that the studies are not clear when viewed in total. I will ask any interested parties (including Vivian Giang) to comment on the reliability and usefulness of the studies.

I have no idea how this will turn out. But I think you need to know my starting bias to assess my judging skills.

Keep in mind that the POINT of this is my ignorance. And my bias. I put it on full display for you because I think that is helpful on this issue. If you don’t know what others are thinking, you can not hope to communicate effectively. So as a public service, I present my biased, ignorant, male perspective. But I am open to revising my opinion based on data. Would you ask any more of me?

Here is my starting bias:

1. Gender discrimination in the workplace is a big problem, according to some types of studies and countless first-hand accounts. With so much smoke, I assume there is fire. 

2. The problem of gender discrimination is curiously invisible to men, and that includes me. All I see is a confused ball of incomplete thinking on all sides. But that tells us nothing about how big the problem is. Cognitive dissonance is a reasonable hypothesis for why lots of folks fail to see the obvious. I see no reason to exclude myself from the ranks of the deluded. 

3. My working hypothesis is that studies showing gender bias in controlled tests don’t translate into the workplace as pay differentials — at least in this country — because educated adults are on the alert for gender bias. So we use our reason to compensate for the bias, if for no other reason than to avoid lawsuits. Any time I am involved in hiring, the risk of unintentional bias is always top of mind. And since men have a biological impulse to be successful and powerful to attract quality mates, hiring the right employees (and avoiding lawsuits) is in our best interest. 

4. Some men are bullies and assholes. And most men are assholes at least some of the time. When men are bullies and assholes to each other, we interpret it as exactly that. But if I observe those same bullies and assholes mistreating a woman, I interpret it as sexism. I assume others see it the same way.

5. I have also blogged that I think women should have a few superior rights to men because they handle the vital function of reproduction. In general, society grants extra rights to folks who take on extra responsibility. That’s why cops can speed, soldiers can kill, and so on. One example of extra rights in this context is that I think only women should have a vote on abortion laws. 

Things get thornier when you are talking about a workplace with pregnant women, potentially pregnant women, and moms. Big companies can absorb some extra friction for the larger benefit of society, but small ones do not have that option. If you own a small business, you don’t want to have two of your three employees out on maternity leave at the same time, to pick a worst-case scenario. A rational small business owner will discriminate in that case and hope to get away with it. And a rational victim of discrimination in that case will sue. That part of the story seems clear to everyone. And I have not heard a proposed solution. But if a proposed solution provided superior rights for women without hurting small businesses, I can imagine that working for me.

6. The other day a good friend who works as a massage therapist was describing a time in her past she was a victim of gender discrimination. The story sounded convincing to me. Then I asked if she knew I would not have considered her as my massage therapist if she were a man. 

Cricket noises.

Personally, I have willfully discriminated by gender in my business dealings at least … oh, a hundred times. And every time it was in favor of women, simply because I prefer the energy. I spend way too much time with men because of shared interests. I need balance in my life, so I bend the rules to get it. I have never considered using a male real estate broker, for example. I get the same service from a woman and it is a great break from the dude-centric rest of my life.

My larger point today is that any discussion of gender in the workplace is like two blind people standing on an elephant and arguing whether the elephant is a sandwich or a bar of soap. Both are 100% wrong. That includes me. 

Evolution did not give us brains that can comprehend our reality. All we have is the type of brains that did not get our ancestors killed. So our brains create delusions of reality and we try to force reason onto them. That’s why men and women are looking at the same elephant but one sees a bar of soap and the other sees a sandwich. 

Is it possible to get to a clearer view of this topic? THAT is the interesting part to me. This is in the category of things that cannot be communicated, which is a big interest of mine.

Part of the problem is that anyone dumb enough to engage in this topic becomes a target for the angry villagers with pitchforks. The only reason I can be this reckless is that I already made all the money I will ever need and I feel as if getting some clarity on this topic would be a public good. And seriously, who else would even try to be objective on this topic in public? This is a suicide mission. 

And if you think any of this is good for traffic to my site, you would be wrong. There will be a two-day traffic bump followed by 5% of regular readers swearing off this site for good. That is the usual pattern for a hot topic here.

Ladies and gentlemen, please provide your links and your insights on gender bias and discrimination in the workplace. I will compile them in summary form and give my verdict. 

Long-winded comments will be ignored unless the first sentence or two are awesome.

Let’s do this.

Scott

@scottadamssays

In other news, a start-up called EnChroma figured out how to make glasses that correct color blindness. As a bonus, the glasses also make colors pop for everyone else too. Will spectacles start replacing contacts and laser eye surgery because the color you see with these glasses is so much better? Could happen.

And what about a finger-attached device for the blind that reads aloud what they point to on a page? This is a good year for people with vision problems. 


Scott Adams Blog

I Hate it When Science Beats Art

Over at Business Insider they are running my Slideshare presentation (based on my book) about systems versus goals, and passion being overrated. But here’s the interesting part.

Most of you remember a year ago when I was pimping my book on success like crazy and failing to get many people interested. I tried a lot of approaches to get attention, but none made a dent in the public’s consciousness. In other words, the artist in me that has instincts and intuitions and other arty feelings was a failure at marketing.

So I tried science to see how that would compare. I hired Rexi Media to help me put together the Slideshare using science to make my message more powerful and memorable. It turns out that there are plenty of studies suggesting how to do this sort of thing, so with Rexi Media’s help I wrapped my message in a science-approved formula and put it out in the world.

The science-driven Slideshare outperformed everything else I tried, by a wide margin. And now, many months later, Business Insider took an interest in it and turned it into one of the hottest items on their page. See the “heat” indicator on each item below it.

image

I find this a humbling experience because I thought I had a good handle on what people would find interesting and engaging. I don’t. But science filled the gap. And the book popped back into the top ten list for self-help books.

Scott Adams

@ScottAdamsSays (my dangerous tweets)

My book on success: “It’s already working for me, as I have started implementing what I have learned…” – D. Limbach


Scott Adams Blog

Skeptics Say Science Has No Obligation to Communicate Clearly

I was just alerted to an odd podcast called The Skeptics Guide to the Universe in which a panel of unpleasant people take things out of context and get angry about them. Apparently I was in their cross-hairs on Episode 502, about 16 minutes in. I can’t link to it directly but the main page is here.

Keep in mind that this is a panel of rational, science-loving skeptics. That’s what makes observing the irrationality extra fun. The psychology of it is fascinating. I’ll walk you through it.

[Updated 3/2/15 at end]

If you feel bored enough to listen to the podcast, you’ll first hear a bunch of angry skeptics AGREEING with what I wrote in this post while pretending they are DISAGREEING with it by adding an angry and dismissive tone to it. As a hobbyist hypnotist, I recognize that as a “tell” for cognitive dissonance that will likely worsen. 

And it does.

At one point in the podcast they start imagining that I wrote about a conspiracy theory in which science and the media intentionally mislead the public. (Remember, these are rational, scientific, skeptical people. And they were ready to believe I wrote of a grand conspiracy between science and the media to mislead the public for…fun? Money? The motive was left off the conspiracy theory.)

How do super-rational people turn into chimps in under a minute? The fields of hypnosis and psychology explain it. This is quite normal. You need the following set-up, which they had:

Bias: The Internet has a persistent rumor that I don’t believe in science because I don’t understand how it works. The rumor started the usual way, with some acts of outragism in which stuff I wrote was taken out of context so I could be held up as an example of a dumb Creationists and (ironically) crucified for the benefit of science. Since I haven’t believed in God since I was eleven, the claim that I am a creationist supporter feels odd to me. But hey, this is the Internet. 

Violation of the Bias: To generate cognitive dissonance you need a violation of bias. I provided that trigger when I wrote a critique of how science has communicated to the public, and how the media makes things worse. The skeptical panelists agreed with every point I made, and clearly said so.

Now the skeptics had a dilemma. How could their opinions be identical to the opinions of the guy who famously (they think) holds exactly the OPPOSITE opinion? Opposites can’t be the same.

So the brain punts. It cooks up a delusion to patch the break in mental cohesion. It makes the discomfort of misunderstanding go away. 

My rational readers will be quick to point out that I might be the one experiencing cognitive dissonance, and I accept that possibility. I wouldn’t even be surprised if it turned out to be the case. 

Shall we test it?

And by we I mean you. If I’m in the grips of my own delusions, new data probably won’t change things for me. But you are relatively uninterested in this situation so your biases are probably less hardened than mine. See what you think.

I offer this unscientific test of who is experiencing the bigger delusions — the angry skeptics or me. 

If you were one of the skeptics on the panel, please paraphrase in your own words (in the comments below) what you think I said that is different from what you believe. And I will confirm whether your summary of my words is accurate or not. To keep things simple, please put my alleged point of contention in one sentence, as in:

“You said the moon is made of cheese!”

I predict there will be zero points of disagreement, at least about science. And I hope you find it interesting that an entire panel of skeptics thought I said a number of disagreeable things.

Also, please let me know if my title to this post seems fair based on the podcast. It sounded to me as if they are saying science doesn’t have an obligation to communicate to the public. I agree with that, as there is technically no legal or professional obligation to do so. But if letting the media do the talking for science is leading to the end of the civilization (climate change, the Singularity, etc.) I think I would try to step up my game in communicating. But that’s just me.

I wonder if they realize I’m trying to help.

An interesting update:

Here’s an example of how science’s lack of credibility with the general public has a big impact on the issue of gender discrimination in the workplace. 

Business Insider has two different articles here and here that reference various studies showing substantial gender bias. The writers do a good job of clearly explaining the studies and their implications. But does the public believe the studies? Should they?

Can it be said with any sort of statistical comfort that studies “like this” generally get confirmed over time by more studies? Or will we be laughing at these studies a generation from now? Personally, I put the odds between 10-90%. In other words, I have no idea. And I don’t think it is because I didn’t pay attention in science class. When did my science teacher tell me that initial study results in physics or medicine have X chance of confirmation over time whereas social science studies are Y?

If I were a woman, and I experienced gender bias first-hand, the studies would be a confirmation of my experience. A two-point confirmation passes most people’s B.S. filter. It certainly would for me.

But men often don’t recognize gender bias even while committing it. As the Business Insider article suggests, much of the bias is subconscious. So it is no surprise that men probably dismiss the studies on gender bias as not matching their experience.

Consider the study in which a man or woman’s first name determined how the applicant was treated. Does that study result translate into the real world as the reporting implies? If I work in HR for a Fortune 500 company, I am probably actively looking for more diversity, because my pay depends on it. So the laws and practices already in place give applicants with sub-optimal first names a winning strategy if they pick their targets. And the targets are easy to identify.

Omitting that strategy from stories about bias seems like a political statement and not news. So the communication method in this case worked against credibility. A basic strategy for credibility is that you acknowledge the weakness in your own point.

So how do you convince men that gender bias is an important issue worthy of their time when they can not see it with their own eyes (usually) and science has a credibility problem? Here’s an idea:

Try this thought experiment

If you are a man, imagine yourself at a business meeting with about eight women at the table and no other males. Can you imagine your opinions being fully valued? It is actually hard to imagine, in the literal sense. Now replace the women with Elbonians or anyone else. Same problem. Common sense and experience says the like-minded majority will usually dominate any group dynamics. And they won’t necessarily know they are steamrolling anyone. 

Gender bias in the workplace looks like a big problem to me. There is way too much smoke for there to be no fires. But I don’t think we have a clue how to properly measure it. And without proper measurement it is far harder to know the best solutions. You would approach the first-name bias problem differently than you would approach a solution to other bias problems. So measuring matters.

The credibility of science is critically important to gender bias issues. But as many skeptics and scientists have told me in the past few days, science has no obligation to do a good job informing the general public. And evidently the media is incapable.

Scott

[Update: So far, as predicted, nothing but cricket noises from my challenge to present even one sentence, in your own words, that is something I said that is disagreeable to science. And yes, I do have the skeptics’ attention.]

————————————————————————————————————————-

Check out the latest news on holograms and teleportation on Paul Worthington’s Top Tech Blog.

See Tamra Teig’s Berkeley Start-up Review blog for the most interesting start-ups coming out of the Berkeley start-up ecosystem (second only to Stanford in number.)

And don’t miss Vivian Giang’s post on the dangers of smiling 🙂

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My book on success: “…the best business book I have read in the last decade.” (Amazon 5-star review Feb 26, 2015)


Scott Adams Blog

Science Proves That Not All Guys Are Wired to Be Promiscuous

Bad news for cheating guys: new findings suggest that males are not hardwired to want to sleep with as many women as possible. A study published in the Royal Society Open Science and reported by…




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The Science of Interstellar (Unabridged) – Kip Thorne

Kip Thorne - The Science of Interstellar (Unabridged)  artwork

The Science of Interstellar (Unabridged)

Kip Thorne

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 20.95

Publish Date: January 9, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Tantor Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

From Magic to Science (sort of)

When I was young and trying to figure out the world, nearly every piece of popular “advice” people offered was complete bullshit. Let’s look at a few.

Advice is Useful: I used to think there was such a thing as “advice” that existed as little nuggets of valuable knowledge. If you were lucky enough to have lots of these advice nuggets you could piece them together and create and awesome plan that was likely to pay off.

As an adult, I can see that generic advice for specific individuals almost never makes sense. Every situation is unique. If I taught you everything I know it would not help you become the next Dilbert cartoonist. The environment changed since I made my run. And your mix of natural talents is unlikely to be similar to mine.

You’re probably thinking that some sorts of advice are universally applicable, such as the idea that hard work produces good results. But if I look around me, two of my richest friends work the fewest hours because they picked careers that allowed that to happen. I know rich people who have broken laws, become drug users, been dishonest, you name it. If you throw darts at a board with good and bad advice ranging from “get good grades in school” to “knock up your high school girlfriend” I can find examples of folks who made every situation work.

What do all successful people have in common? Beats me. I haven’t seen a correlation. I’ve seen lots of business plans in the past year and one of the best was from a guy that had a hard time getting through high school.  The entrepreneurs with advanced degrees are pushing science forward and taking their 10% chance of commercializing products that can change the world. The high school graduate looked at the legal weed business and said, “I can do a lot of things wrong and still make money as a legal grower because the margins are so high.” Which entrepreneur do you bet on? If you think you know the answer, you don’t understand the nature of start-ups.

Be Yourself: You used to hear the “be yourself” advice a lot. Apparently there is some sort of “real” you buried beneath the layers of social training. And that personality you keep hiding is amazing. The reality of course is that there is no real you anywhere. You are just a coincidental outcome of nature plus environment. (Optionally, add God to the mix if you like.)  If you were dumb enough to act “yourself” you would be a horrible friend. You’d be naked, unwashed, and rude. And you’d be masturbating in public way too much. So do us all a favor and keep your genuine self a secret, please.

Follow Your Passion: I won’t belabor this point because you’ve read my thoughts on this. Again, most of my rich and successful friends exhibit nothing that looks like passion. They had talent and energy and a desire to do whatever worked. Passion is magical thinking. Passion can’t be managed and it can’t be defined. And in my experience, passion is what you get when something works. When I was a kid, I was passionate about playing in the NBA. So were a million other kids. Passion isn’t a substitute for being tall, smart, or anything else. In fact, passion is the one thing you can remove from most success stories and get exactly the same result. In my case, Dilbert was one of several dozen business ideas I’ve tried. It worked because the timing was right, not because of my passion. I had about equal interest in everything I tried.

Willpower: I write about willpower as if it is real. But that’s a limitation of language. Science says you can manage your willpower by how much sugar you eat. And science says willpower is a limited resource during any given day.

The reality is that willpower is like the horizon. You can see it and talk about it, but in the end it is a perception and not something that exists in the physical world. My view is that we’re all particles bumping around according to some mysterious rules of physics. When your hunger is high, you eat. When it isn’t, other activities are more inviting. There is no willpower; there are just options and for a variety of rational and irrational “reasons” we choose one over the other. The end.

Have Goals: I wrote a whole book on why goals are for losers. I won’t repeat it here. The summary is that goals are perfectly harmless and sometimes helpful for simple situations, such as getting a good grade on a test. But when planning your multi-decade future, everything is an unknown, so your best bet is a system that improves your odds in some general way.

You Can Pick Winners: We used to think we could look at a business plan and use our impressive intellects to pick winners out of the pack. Now we know it can’t be done except probably by chance. There are always too many unknowns, and luck is always the biggest factor among the worthy candidates for success.

Fast Forward to 2015…

Today we have replaced a lot of the magical thinking of old with something that looks a lot more like science, at least in terms of testing ideas and seeing how they turn out, and not believing in things that can’t be seen or measured. Now you see more of this sort of talk…

Systems vs. Goals: Develop a system that improves your value in the world in a general way and make it easier for luck to find you.

Habit: You can rewire your brain by repetition and reward. So rewire your brain in ways that can improve your odds of success.

Manage Willpower: Willpower isn’t real in the old-timey sense that we can scrunch our foreheads and generate more of it when needed so long as our parents raised us right. But it does seem true, according to studies, that using your so-called willpower in one situation leaves you less self-restraint for the next, in any given day. So the modern view is that you manage willpower like a limited resource instead of a super power you can summon on command.

No One Can Pick Winners: Today, investors in the start-up world understand that no one is smart enough to consistently pick winners. You can’t think your way to success. Sure, you can weed out the totally-bad business ideas from the rest, but within the universe of plausible start-ups, no one is good at picking winners. So the scientific workaround for that is…

A-B testing: You keep trying different things in rapid succession and track how users respond.

Pivot: Start-ups start with one idea and quickly pivot to another if the first doesn’t work out. Your odds of success are still low with each idea, but every attempt betters your skillset and your odds.

I’m telling an incomplete story here, but the general idea is that a scientific mindset is slowly replacing the magical thinking about “success” that dominated my generation.

Scott Adams

Here’s a link to the paperback of How to Fail Almost Everything And Still Win Big

Co-founder of CalendarTree.com     

Twitter Dilbert: @Dilbert_Daily

Twitter for Scott: @ScottAdamsSays


Scott Adams Blog

M.D. Science Lab Adds Sean Browne to Sales Force

M.D. Science Lab has announced the hiring of Sean Browne to its expanding team of sales executives.
XBIZ.com | Top Stories

Does Science Work?

Earlier this year I worked with Dr. Carmen Simon at Rexi Media to create a memorable SlideShare presentation of my latest book. Did Dr. Simon's double-doctorate and fancy brain science make any difference to the outcome?

Today I learned that out of millions of presentations on the SlideShare site, our work was picked as a Best of 2014.

Given that my book was not a best-seller or even close, one has to assume my sparkling content was not the reason for the achievement. Science wins again.

To be fair, the other millions of creators are probably still operating at the "People like blue" level of design. While no one was paying attention, the job of designing moved from art to science.

Ever wonder why Apple consistently does great design and others can't seem to figure it out? My assumption is that Apple is using science and other companies are using art. I once worked in the Human Interface test lab at Pacific Bell and saw how powerful science is when applied to design. And science has learned a lot since those days.

— And now I talk about robots again —

I have a Dilbert series in the pipeline in which robots learn cognitive science simply by reading the Internet. All of the science is there. Robots thus informed could control human decisions without us being the wiser.

In other words, robots will never need a bloody coup to take control of Earth. All they need to do is read the Internet where we humans have painstakingly documented the science that will allow robots to manipulate our emotions and thus our choices without our knowledge.

My guess is that most of you think this cognitive science stuff is only influencing group averages and isn't much of a factor in your own daily decisions. But I will tell you that if you have a background in hypnosis and you have wallowed in this cognitive science stuff as I have for both work and fun, you see it as a far more powerful force, and possibly the only important trend for the future.

Someday robots will fix most of humanity's problems in the areas of energy, food, water, medicine and even climate change. They might even make war obsolete. But in the process of solving these problems the robots will acquire cognitive science knowledge that will effectively give them control of any democratic country because they can control the majority opinion through cognitive manipulation.

And even more interesting is the question of whether humans will someday prefer machine-based government over human control. I don't want some human telling me how to live my life based on his belief in magic. But I don't get angry at my ATM for only giving me the amount of money that I have in my own account. The machines will follow agreed rules and be predictable. I want a machine overlord, not some corrupt, drunken, horny, tired human that had a bad childhood.

But that's just me.

Scott Adams
Co-founder of CalendarTree.com     
Author of this book 
Twitter Dilbert: @Dilbert_Daily
Twitter for Scott: @ScottAdamsSays

 


Dilbert.com Blog

Diet Science in 2014

I can accurately predict whether you will meet your weight loss goals by the way you talk about it.

I mean that literally. I think I could devise a controlled experiment in which I pick weight-loss winners and losers in advance based on nothing but a transcript of folks talking about their fitness goals.

I'll give you some examples. What follows is a list of things you will hear from people that have no legitimate chance of losing weight and keeping it off. Yes, your thing is probably on this list and it pisses you off to see it. But stay with me and I'll change your life by the end of this post.

Here's what people say when they are preparing to fail at a weight-loss strategy.

"I need to exercise more."

"I'm counting calories."

"I have a cheat day coming."

"I'm watching my portions."

"I'm doing a cleanse."

"I'm trying the (whatever) diet plan."

Ten years ago I would have said everything on the list is a common-sense way to lose weight. But science has since shown otherwise. I'll go through them one at a time.

"I need to exercise more."

You probably DO need to exercise more, for lots of health-related reasons, but exercise is a terrible way to lose weight. Science tells us that exercise is maybe 20% of the solution and diet is 80%, roughly speaking. So when I hear someone talking about trying to lose sixty pounds by joining a gym, I know that person isn't up-to-date on the science and doesn't have a plan that can work. The only way to lose tons of weight through exercise alone is by pushing yourself to the pain point, and science tells us that in that case your subconscious mind will find a way to be "too busy" to keep exercising.

During the first week of January my gym fills with overweight people who think they can exercise their way to slimness. After a month they will see no improvement and quit. The gym probably makes its entire profit from the folks that mistakenly believe exercise is a great diet plan.

"I'm counting calories."

If you are counting calories you probably don't know about the recent science on hunger control. One of the best ways to decrease hunger naturally is by eating calorie-laden fatty stuff such as peanuts. Science says that peanut-eaters lose weight even though they eat fatty peanuts because it suppresses their appetite. Meanwhile, calorie-counters might eat carbs with low calories without knowing they are stimulating appetite by their food choices.

"I have a cheat day coming."

Science tells us that unpredictable rewards create addiction. If you find yourself talking about your upcoming cheat day a week in advance, and craving it, you probably just set yourself up to become addicted to that cheat day – and therefore bad food in general – by your diet plan. If you reward yourself for "cheating" your diet, what do you think happens to your brain wiring? Yup, you crave the bad food that is the reward. Worst…diet…strategy…ever.

"I'm watching my portions."

Portion control has the same problem as calorie-counting. If you eat the right food, portion control takes care of itself. When was the last time you ate too much broccoli? If portion control even enters your mind, it means you don't understand the science about food cravings and the science about the glycemic index. Successful dieters manage their food choices and eat as much of anything as they want. The secret is in changing the "wanting" part, not the portion size. Eating a smaller portion of cake is rewarding the part of your brain that wants cake.

"I'm doing a cleanse."

I timed myself and it took exactly five seconds to find a Mayo Clinic link that says science does not support cleanses. If your diet plan can be debunked in five seconds, you probably aren't a seeker of knowledge. So even if a cleanse turns out to be accidentally a good idea, a knowledge-free long-term diet strategy has a low chance of success.

"I'm trying the (whatever) diet plan."

When I took my dog to puppy training class the instructor told us the importance of training the dog in different locations. If you only train your dog to sit when he is in your kitchen, he only learns to do the trick in that one room. You walk into the living room and the dog doesn't understand why you are doing the "sitting in the kitchen" trick in the wrong place. It will just stare at you.

My point is that if you learn to lose weight on a diet plan . . . all you learned is how to lose weight on a diet plan. After you lose your ten pounds you stop the plan and return to your normal diet. You don't know how to lose weight on your normal diet. Now you're the dog in the living room looking puzzled when someone says, "sit."

Okay, so those are all the things that don't work. So what does work?

Beats me. I'm not a doctor. But I can tell you my story to compare to other folks' accounts and maybe you can see a pattern. What I noticed in myself is that until I reached a critical base of knowledge about diet science I couldn't lose weight no matter how much so-called willpower I brought to it. As a reference point, I have a lot of this thing called willpower. Generally speaking, I simply have to want something badly enough and I'll chew through a concrete wall to get it. But willpower didn't help me lose weight, and it took me decades to learn why. In my defense, science was confused about diet choices until recently too, so the knowledge I needed didn't exist. Now it does.

I've lost 26 pounds from my high adult weight, gradually, over years. None of the improvement is from any sort of "diet." I simple acquired knowledge about nutrition and food science, a bit at a time, year-by-year, until some sort of critical mass was hit. Now I literally eat as much as I want, whenever I want, of whatever I want, and I have the body of a 19-year old swimmer who was tragically born with an old guy's head.

The secret to eating whatever I want is that I systematically reduced my cravings for the wrong food. Now I only want things that happen to be great for my body. And I also experimented for years to find ways to prepare healthy food that doesn't taste like your grandpa's socks. I'm already looking forward to my protein smoothie that is full of berries, almond butter, yogurt, protein powder, chia seeds, almond milk and ice. I get the same pleasure from the smoothie that I once got from ice cream. Sacrifice? Zero. Portion control? Zero. I often have two smoothies in a row just for the pleasure.

As an aside, my efforts in learning to control my food cravings are part of a larger decade-long personal experiment in which I am seeing how much I can reprogram my basic human preferences using science and my knowledge of hypnosis. Preview: So far, almost all of my most basic preferences in life seem reprogrammable. That will be another blog post someday.

If you want links to any of the science I mentioned, I have most of that in my latest book.

You shouldn't listen to cartoonists when it comes to health decisions. All I'm trying to add to the discussion is the idea that knowledge of food science can replace your need for willpower, and that wasn't possible until recently because the knowledge didn't exist. So consider a diet that involves consuming knowledge first. You'll know you have enough knowledge the first time you consciously eliminate a food craving you've had all your life.*

Good luck!

——————–

Scott Adams
Co-founder of CalendarTree.com     
Author of this book 

Twitter Dilbert: @Dilbert_Daily

Twitter for Scott: @ScottAdamsSays

  *That's a hypnosis trick I just did for you. It's a trigger for the future.

 


Dilbert.com Blog