Somewhere In Time – Jeannot Szwarc

Jeannot Szwarc - Somewhere In Time  artwork

Somewhere In Time

Jeannot Szwarc

Genre: Romance

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: October 3, 1980


Somewhere in Time is the story of a young writer who sacrifices his life in the present to find happiness in the past, where true love awaits him. Young Richard Collier (Christopher Reeve) is approached by an elderly woman who gives him an antique gold watch and who pleads with him to return in time with her. Years later, Richard Collier is overwhelmed by a photograph of a beautiful young woman (Jane Seymour). Another picture of this woman in her later years reveals to him that she is the same woman who had given him the gold watch. Collier then becomes obsessed with returning to 1912 and the beautiful young woman who awaits him there.

© © 1980 UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Drama

Between Somewhere – Token

Token - Between Somewhere  artwork

Between Somewhere

Token

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: December 7, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Token, LLC

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Episode 303 Scott Adams: Talking About Robots and AI Because it Must be 4:20 Somewhere

Topics: 

  • What does it mean to be alive and intelligent?
    • Human intelligence is an illusion
    • A guiding principle we should give AI robots

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

The post Episode 303 Scott Adams: Talking About Robots and AI Because it Must be 4:20 Somewhere appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere – Anything and Everything, Live from Kansas City – Shinedown

Shinedown - Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere - Anything and Everything, Live from Kansas City  artwork

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere – Anything and Everything, Live from Kansas City

Shinedown

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: May 3, 2011


Somewhere In The Stratosphere Acoustic was filmed during the band's Anything And Everything: An Acoustic Evening With Shinedown 2011 tour. It includes a live set of the show featuring tracks from their platinum plus selling album Sound Of Madness. With six number 1 album singles under their belt, the band puts an acoustic spin on "Devour", "The Crow", "And The Butterfly", "Second Chance" and many more from their rich catalog of hits. Shinedown was most recently praised for their radio success in the most recent issue of Billboard and the acoustic tour received rave reviews.

© © 2011 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Somewhere in Between – Adam Hood

Adam Hood - Somewhere in Between  artwork

Somewhere in Between

Adam Hood

Genre: Country

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: October 12, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Southern Songs under exclusive license to Soundly Music

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Country

Exclusive: “Crazy Rich Asians” Director Jon M. Chu’s iPhone XS Movie, “Somewhere”

Jon M. Chu, director of Crazy Rich Asians, made this short film exclusively for WIRED using the new Apple iPhone XS Max. Chu shot and edited the film himself, shooting handheld in available light and using only the native camera app and default stabilizer, without any additional crew or equipment.

“Somewhere”
Shot on the iPhone XS Max
No filters, no color correction.

Director, Cinematographer, Editor: Jon M. Chu
Starring: Luigi Rosado

WIRED Videos

Somewhere in Memory – Khoa Vu

Khoa Vu - Somewhere in Memory  artwork

Somewhere in Memory

Khoa Vu

Genre: Instrumental

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: May 18, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Khoa Vu

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Instrumental

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere – Shinedown

Shinedown - Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere  artwork

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere

Shinedown

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: May 3, 2011


Somewhere In The Stratosphere Electric was filmed in Washington state on August 8th, 2010. This concert performance includes a live set of wildly popular tracks off the band's platinum plus selling Sound Of Madness. Featuring the driving rock of "Diamond Eyes (Boom-Lay Boom-Lay Boom)", "Second Chance", "Sound of Madness" and more. The acoustic set of Somewhere In The Stratosphere, recorded in Kansas City, provides a front and center look at the passion and energy that go into every Shinedown performance.

© © 2011 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Avengers 2: There May Just Be A Pop Epic Somewhere Inside Marvel’s “Disappointing” Age of Ultron Mega-Hit

For what’s turned out to be one of the biggest hits of all-time — likely finishing its first release run at number 6 on the all-time worldwide box office list and number 8 on the domestic box office list — the not especially felicitously titled Avengers: Age of Ultron has gotten a lot less love and devotion than the numbers would suggest. And the numbers themselves, at least in some circles perhaps predisposed to backlash against the ongoing success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, are a tad disappointing.

Naturally, some important spoilers ensue.

Yes, with its Japan opening over the weekend suggesting it will end up with something under $ 1.5 billion in worldwide box office, Avengers 2 is ending up within at least distant hailing distance of The Avengers. But its domestic performance, which will end under $ 460 million, is a far cry from the first film’s stunning $ 623 million. And the worldwide performance will end up bested both by 2015 rivals Jurassic World and Fast & Furious 7. With the Star Wars reboot, initially expected to be the Avengers only real box rival this year, still waiting in December.

When I first saw Avengers 2, as it opened at the beginning of May, I liked it and found it intriguing. I also found it busy and a bit frustrating for all its franchise-building business and repeated action.

Then, a month ago, I watched it three times in a row in the theater, including a 3D showing, which I usually don’t like. I found that I liked the film a lot better, not that I disliked it at all before. I also found that depths and connections, which the film only hinted at the first time round, seemed much richer than before. But I also realized that my mind was not only remembering and connecting more, it was also filling in some gaps that the present version of the film does not.


The bright picture of the Marvelverse’s near future darkens in Avengers: Age of Ultron. It’s the end of the path Tony Stark started them on.

Clearly, there’s more to Avengers 2 somewhere, perhaps enough to turn a good movie into a near-pop epic. And it turns out there will be a director’s cut available when the film is released on disc and digital download in September.

Should this nearly hour-longer version have been released theatrically in the first place? Perhaps, especially if Marvel wanted moviegoers to take to Avengers 2 anywhere near as much as they did in 2012 to The Avengers, in which all the characters have room to breathe and scenes play out. But perhaps not if they’re in business to maximize profit. Fewer showings per day, and all that. And this is an ADD era.

Maybe the movie should have tried to do less. As it is, it does so much that the central storyline, gripping and relatable in the Marvelverse, loses focus and impact. That’s Tony Stark, in his angst and hubris in the aftermath of the first film’s near apocalypse in New York, reverting to arrogant form in secretly creating the Ultron program.

Tony just wants what many of us want: A sustainable global security architecture imbued with a sense of justice. Kinda like Franklin D. Roosevelt’s conception of the United Nations. Except with artificial intelligence and robots, absent the trappings of democracy.

As Nick Fury tells him in their farmhouse confrontation, Tony didn’t hesitate for a second before he just went for it. Tony’s ongoing fear of the unknowable threats he glimpsed in space as he let go of that redirected nuke in The Avengers joins with his post-traumatic stress and inherent arrogance to make a megalomaniac. And a very dangerous one, at that, albeit with the best of intentions.

The movie exists because the supposed best and brightest — not to mention the brightest light and biggest star of the Marvelverse — makes a horrible series of mistakes that not only backfire but nearly cause humanity’s annihilation.

Big stuff. And it’s in this version of Avengers 2. But it’s muted by all the other stuff going on, much of it moving building blocks into place for future movies, some of it intriguing things writer/director Joss Whedon wanted to do.

Whedon spoke before Avengers 2 was finished of wanting to make The Empire Strikes Back of the Marvelverse but fearing it would be more like Iron Man 2.

Like Avengers 2 in the Marvelverse, Empire Strikes Back is a transitional portion of the Star Wars saga. The most critically revered and I think easily the best of the Star Wars films, Empire Strikes Back represents a darkening of the Star Wars universe, previously rather bright and, at times, even effervescent. It was also the lowest grossing film in the original trilogy.

Like Empire Strikes Back, Avengers 2 marks a dark turn in the Marvelverse, in this case a dark turn which began with a PTSD Tony Stark in Iron Man 3 and which heightened with last year’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

I wondered before Avengers 2 opened if the darkening of the Marvelverse, always more brightly hued and humorous than the Dark Knight Trilogy, would prevent the new film from surpassing The Avengers.

With the great expansion over the past few years of the studios’ ability to penetrate the international marketplace, Avengers 2 had seemed likely to best The Avengers in worldwide box office even if, as also seemed likely, it was not as big a pop phenomenon in North America. But it’s coming up short, following the very likely drop of more than 25 percent in domestic box office performance from the first film.

The darkening prospect of Avengers 2 and its inherent lack of resolution as a transitional picture are big parts of that result, as is the “busy-ness” of all the business the film takes on.

All the busy business drawing from the main storyline makes Avengers 2, as Joss Whedon evidently feared, more than a little like Iron Man 2. In that 2010 sequel to the 2008 pop classic that was the first Iron Man (both films directed by Jon Favreau), an intriguing conflict between Tony and his might-have-been Russian doppelgänger is frequently derailed by campy interludes with a Stark rival and by the showy introduction of Black Widow.

Though I’ve since come to absolutely love Scarlett Johansson in the role, she was at the time being hyped in the media as the hottest woman in the world. I found it all a bit much.

In retrospect, seeing all these movies fitting together, there’s much of Iron Man 2 I love. And in any event, Avengers 2 works better as an individual film than Iron Man 2. It just needs less. Or more.

Since much of what we have is now already in our heads and seems truncated, I want more.

In The Empire Strikes Back, only Luke has a vision foreshadowing events. In this film, Tony, Natasha, Thor, Cap, and Banner all have visions induced by the Scarlet Witch. Only Tony’s seems like it might be complete.

What does not seem stinted on in this version of the film is the action. Of course, that’s bread and butter for its bottom line. If anything, though, there may be too much action. Especially with the big climactic battle.

There’s not much I don’t like in how Marvel uber-producer Kevin Feige and company put these films together. With the notable exception of these big battle scenes near the end of each film. (I’m someone who would like a film full of scenes like the terrific Avengers cocktail party scene in this picture. That’s where having an outstanding cast across the board, and clever, often heartfelt, writing, really shows up. That said, it would be hard to say I’m not an action fan.)

Even in the first Avengers, the big battle at the end seemed a little too long. And that was to save New York, with the crowning scene which redeems Tony’s self-absorbed anti-hero into a truly self-sacrificing hero.

Here the battle’s to save a fake place, a fairly generic East Euro city called Sokovia — not to be confused with the classical guitarist Segovia — which would actually play better as a Balkans locale. So why not make it a real one, with Stark’s weaponeers back in the day imprinting the Maximoff twins with fear and hatred after selling to all sides in the post-Cold War ethnic conflicts?

With the truncated visions, and the obviously foreshortened presentation of the charmingly bittersweet Natasha-Banner relationship, big chunks of rich characterization and motivation are lost in the service of the film’s velocity. But if the stuff on screen doesn’t bring the audience along in full engagement as it whizzes by, the purpose is diminished.

Despite it all, we do know why Tony leaves the Avengers. We’re not so clear on why Hawkeye steps away, though the wonderful sequence surprisingly introducing his wife and kids, Mad Men‘s Linda Cardellini and company, allows you to infer his reasons.

But what is up with Thor leaving?


The Avengers wrap up their Manhattan cocktail party by seeing who is worthy enough to lift Thor’s hammer.

Of course, he has to go back to Asgard for the next big Thor movie. But in this movie, his motivation is pretty hazy.

Also given short shrift is Thor’s remark to Tony about him being the only real unknown in the Avengers mix. I think I know what that means and I don’t want to spoil it, but it zipped by so fast that most people missed it. As did the Norse rune left behind on the ground after Thor’s fiery departure. Nobody even notices it. Not only is its meaning a mystery, it’s a mystery that zipped by so fast that it doesn’t exist as a mystery.

As did Cap’s dream sequence. Tony tells Cap he doesn’t trust a guy without a dark side, but what little we see of Cap back in the ’40s with an always very welcome British agent Peggy Carter is actually pretty weird and dark. What does it mean? We haven’t a clue.

At other points in the film, Cap gazes all too briefly at Hawkeye’s bucolic homestead — the sort of Americana setting one could see Cap in — and elsewhere remarks that he’s not the same man who went into the ice 75 years ago.

That’s pretty interesting for this great iconic character. But he doesn’t elaborate, and no one follows up.

With the crush of major characters in this movie, even the title villain gets a little short-changed in his own movie. As in Iron Man 2, Ultron is, apparently, another would-be Tony Stark doppelgänger, a very intriguing notion that needs to breathe more.

Incidentally, why is it the Age of Ultron, anyway? Yes, that’s what it was in the comics (with a pretty different story), but those were a series. This is one movie, just a matter of days in Marvelverse time, far too brief to be an “age.”

One thing that does pay off late in the film is the wonderful early sequence in which Thor challenges his colleagues to lift his mighty hammer. (Whedon evidently dropped off Twitter after being unfairly savaged for an obscure Tony Stark historical joke that is sexist. It’s not only entirely in character for this rogue, it’s a way for the character to acknowledge and make fun of his being an arrogant dick. Literally.)

Only Cap is able to briefly dent Thor’s smug confidence that only he is worthy enough to wield the hammer. The sequence is very funny and telling.

Later, a new character, created by Ultron and Tony, a melding of Tony’s Jarvis AI assistant and a synthetic human/alloy hybrid body called the Vision, nonchalantly lofts the hammer in the course of things.

With just a little echoing of the Iron Man hot rod red and gold design motif Jarvis helped create, the Vision looks like a great new Avenger.

He agrees with Ultron, before finally dispatching the villainous mistake’s last incarnation, that in the long run humanity is doomed. For two powerful artificial intelligences, both alter egos of a sort to Tony Stark, to agree on this is quite intriguing for the Marvelverse. But it goes by too fast, as does Vision’s observation that the beautiful does not have to last in order to have great value.

The creation of this evidently healthy new life form of great power and insight is a big deal in the Marvelverse, not to mention a harbinger of what may happen in the not terribly distant future in the real world, as I discussed last week. But it loses its impact in this seemingly rushed version of the film.

By the way, we are now 11 movies into a Marvel Cinematic Universe that debuted in 2008 and we still have not been told why the Avengers are called the Avengers.

It’s a little odd, too, because — despite Mrs. Hawkeye’s perfectly droll remark to her husband that she totally supports him in his avenging — the Avengers are not about avenging.

Nick Fury thrilled fanboys across the world in Iron Man‘s add-on scene when he showed up at Tony Stark’s fabulous Malibu pad to say he wanted to talk to him about “the Avenger Initiative.” But he never said why he called it that, either then or in the first Avengers movie when he brought the team together.

Tony mentioned the name to Loki when he confronted him at his fabulous Manhattan pad, but again didn’t explain the name, saying only that if they couldn’t protect the Earth they would damn sure avenge it.

So I looked it up, and it turns out that the name goes back to the first Avengers comic book in 1963.

After their adventure, Ant-Man — who we’ll finally see this month in, well, Ant-Man (with Mad Men star John Slattery again playing Howard Stark, father of Tony Stark) — tells the pick-up group of rather motley superheroes that they should be a team. Iron Man agrees. So does Thor. Hulk says he’s in, too, whether the others like it or not, but what are they going to call themselves?

Wasp, Ant-Man’s future ex-wife, says the name needs to be something “colorful and dramatic, like the Avengers.” That’s it, says Ant-Man, and so it was.

The Avengers come together in very different fashion in the movies. But the name is, as Wasp said back in ’63, “colorful and dramatic.”

That’s why I named my little boat the Avenger back in the day. Not because of the Marvel comic books, which I didn’t read, but because it was the name of a space ship at the end of The Puppet Masters, the old Robert Heinlein novel that first turned me on to science fiction as a kid.

Too aggressive a name for a boat, you say? Not when it has rocket launchers and machine guns, it ain’t.

Besides, it’s a very cool name. Going back 237 years, there have been nine major Royal Navy ships that carried the name Avenger.

And now a second very big movie, one that I suspect is going to deepen into something quite special in its longer version.

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Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere – Anything and Everything, Live from Kansas City – Shinedown

Shinedown - Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere - Anything and Everything, Live from Kansas City  artwork

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere – Anything and Everything, Live from Kansas City

Shinedown

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: May 3, 2011


Somewhere In The Stratosphere Acoustic was filmed during the band's Anything And Everything: An Acoustic Evening With Shinedown 2011 tour. It includes a live set of the show featuring tracks from their platinum plus selling album Sound Of Madness. With six number 1 album singles under their belt, the band puts an acoustic spin on "Devour", "The Crow", "And The Butterfly", "Second Chance" and many more from their rich catalog of hits. Shinedown was most recently praised for their radio success in the most recent issue of Billboard and the acoustic tour received rave reviews.

© © 2011 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Sweet Somewhere Bound – Jackie Greene

Jackie Greene - Sweet Somewhere Bound  artwork

Sweet Somewhere Bound

Jackie Greene

Genre: Blues

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: May 24, 2005

© ℗ 2005 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Blues

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere – Shinedown

Shinedown - Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere  artwork

Shinedown: Somewhere In the Stratosphere

Shinedown

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: May 3, 2011


Somewhere In The Stratosphere Electric was filmed in Washington state on August 8th, 2010. The DVD includes a live set of wildly popular tracks off the band's platinum plus selling Sound Of Madness. Featuring the driving rock of "Diamond Eyes (Boom-Lay Boom-Lay Boom)", "Second Chance", "Save Me" and more the electric set of Somewhere In The Stratosphere provides a front and center look at the passion and energy that go into every Shinedown performance. The band's concert specials have been featured on VH1 and Palladia.

© © 2011 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Boy Scout Finds Eagle Badge Somewhere Over the Rainbow

With Sister Sledge’s “We Are Family” blasting, students, teachers, parents and community members tied thousands of fabric strips to the schoolyard fence. After 15-year-old David Fite tied the last piece into an expert bowline — arguably the strongest knot with the least stress to the lead line — the only thing standing between the boy and his lifelong dream of becoming an Eagle Scout was a rainbow.

When he overheard camp counselors discussing the Boy Scouts of America’s institutionalized homophobia two years ago, David returned home to Chicago despondent. “I was having a blast,” he recalls. “I couldn’t understand why any kid, gay or straight, wouldn’t want to be a part of it.” After a quick Internet search confirmed his worst suspicions, David told his mother that he needed to quit or follow the lead of a handful of Eagle candidates who were earning, then returning, their badges in protest. Since her son loved camping and his troop, and was so close to achieving one of the country’s highest honors, she proposed another idea: If he thought the policy was so immoral, why not convince the organization to change it?

After countless letters to national leadership went unanswered, David joined a broad-based grassroots movement of fellow Scouts using social media to encourage people to make their voices heard. After 6 months of aggressive lobbying, lo and behold, David beat Goliath: the 105-year-old institution begrudgingly reversed its national ban prohibiting openly gay youth Scouts. However, the organization stopped short of permitting “open or avowed” gay adult members or leaders, arguing that to do so “would become a distraction to the mission of the BSA.”

Watching a handful of local chapters mobilizing to defy the new ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy, David sensed an opportunity to move the needle. A boy’s final step to earning his Eagle badge is to “plan, develop and serve as a leader to others in a service project helpful to his religious institution, school,or community.” And so was that last month, a council of Scout elders found itself navigating in uncharted territory.

The men listened thoughtfully as the teenager stood in front of his brightly decorated tri-fold presentation board, nervously explaining the backstory: In 2008, after an incident of gay bullying at my public elementary school, Nettelhorst, concerned parents organized a diversity committee to help foster a culture of tolerance and respect, not just for gay kids, or kids of gay parents, but for all kids. To drive the point home, the group co-opted our annual Fence Project, arranging the colored fabric strips into the pride rainbow sequence, and posting this little sign:

Each Nettelhorst student has tied a piece of fabric to the fence as a tangible sign of his or her personal intention to create a better world. As Nettelhorst, we’ve also made a collective intention: that each of us becomes kinder, gentler and more tolerant. Here, the rainbow colors of gay pride are a visible sign of our respect for the neighborhood of which we are a part, and the diversity of families that we serve. In June, Nettelhorst will be the first public school to walk in Chicago’s Gay Pride Parade. We believe family means everybody. Enjoy the summer: SPF 50, baby!

Many a passerby stopped, smiled, tweeted and posted; some even cried. The rag-tag public civics lesson had inspired a deeply personal, neighborhood catharsis.

But when the Chicago Tribune ran a front-page story cheering our efforts, Nettelhorst landed on every hate blog in the country. We even had the “God Hates Fags” Westboro Baptist Church up from Kansas protesting. Critics accused the school of corrupting innocent children, and using them as pawns in a decidedly liberal social agenda, all on the taxpayer’s dime no less.

Under death threat, 200 Nettelhorst families marched in the parade that year; in fact, we led it. The outpouring of support from the 140,000-strong crowd was overwhelming, as if we had taken away generations of hurt in one surreal-therapeutic-Kodachrome coronation.

“It takes real courage to stand tall against bigotry,” State Representative Sara Feigenholtz said. “While I’ve been fighting tirelessly for basic human rights legislation in Springfield for years, what’s incredible is that these children have shown us what it truly means to value equality, dignity and each other.”

Chicago’s first openly gay Alderman, Tom Tunney, who marched in the parade proudly wearing his Nettelhorst Pride t-shirt, professed that, “Time will show on this day, Nettelhorst was on the right side of history.”

Now, seven years later, the original parent organizers are finally seeing the change they imagined. “We started this movement to teach our children to stand up for each other and for our community,” explains Brad Rossi, the gay father of a Nettelhorst seventh grader. “If they’ve learned that a small group of thoughtful citizens can change the world, and believe themselves to be part of that group, public education will have served its most important function.”

As in years past, every Nettelhorst student tied a piece of fabric to the fence, and made an intention to make the world a better place. The tangible expression of those intentions lured in curious neighbors just long enough to read the laminated sign explaining the project, with one additional paragraph, unthinkable just four months earlier:

This year, David Fite of Boy Scout Troop 115 chose the Nettelhorst Pride install as his Eagle rank community project. The Eagle rank is the highest advancement a young boy can achieve in the scouts — and by leading and completing the Pride projects at Nettelhorst Elementary School, he not only shows that a boy scout must be prepared, but kind, respectful and understand that love is what we all have in common.

Next to the fence, at the corner of Aldine and Broadway, stands a forty-foot ash, one of the few trees to survive America’s devastating emerald ash borer infestation. David’s troop leader climbed a tall ladder to hang disco balls from the branches; fellow Scouts wrapped the trunk in colorful ribbon; Nettelhorst kindergarteners sprinkled the decaying wood chips that cover its roots with glitter. When the new “I DREAM” tree was all finished, David penned the first tag with a Sharpie: “I DREAM… of a day when ALL Americans are free to love and to be loved in return.” -David Fite, Eagle Scout Candidate, Troop 115.

2015-05-16-1431800600-1911860-davidfite.jpg

Want to add your own dream? Leave a comment below starting with “I DREAM…” and David will post it on the tree in your behalf.

2015-05-04-1430763770-4797597-Huffpofence.jpg

The Nettelhorst Pride Fence.

Fence photo by York Chan; David Fite’s photo by Jen Fite.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Heads Up, Royal Baby No. 2! Dad Prince William Needs to Be Somewhere on Saturday

Prince William, Duke of CambridgePrince William may be on paternity leave, but a royal’s work really never ends.

With wife Kate Middleton due to give birth to their second child any day now (maybe it was supposed to…


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Alicia Keys Releases ‘Somewhere In The City’

Alicia Keys has released “Somewhere in the City,” an outtake from her 2012 album Girl on Fire. The piano ballad dropped via Keys website in conjunction with her 12 Days of Christmas giveaways. “Somewhere on an island like mines, the world is shaking / Somewhere on an island like mines hearts are breaking / Seas are rising, birds are diving, dreams may wash away . . .” she sings.
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‘Interstellar’: First Full Trailer Takes Matthew McConaughey… Somewhere Else

The first full trailer for Christopher Nolan’s next movie “Interstellar” has hit, and it’s exactly as epic and mysterious as you’d expect.
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