Colorado College Student to Bring Supreme Resale Marketplace to Los Angeles

BUSINESS-MINDED: Never underestimate the business savvy and passion of a Supreme fan. Take 20-year-old Zachary Dorf, who used to consistently camp outside Supreme’s New York store, while still in high school, just so he could get his hands on the latest drops.
That devotion grew a social media fan base that later evolved into a business bringing together vendors and consumers of Supreme and other coveted streetwear brands to buy and trade, called Solepreme Con.
Saturday, Dorf brings Solepreme to Los Angeles for the first time, on Cahuenga Boulevard, for five hours of buying, selling and trading of brands such as Supreme, Off-White, Gucci and Raf Simons.
Dorf, whose father owns the winery and music venue City Winery, estimates the West Coast show, totaling some 40 vendors, will draw attendees about on par with New York, which has been about 1,000 people. He’s charging $ 25 for general admission in addition to $ 119 for a single vendor table.
Back in his teens, the University of Colorado Boulder student, who is studying entrepreneurship, would typically be one of the first 10 customers inside the Supreme store on drop days. Aside from garnering Instagram followers through his dedication, Dorf would sometimes gain insider information on drops.
When he

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Episode 127: Oprah, Optimism, North Korea and Supreme Court Picks, Debating Dale

Topics: 

  • Oprah’s comment about Democrat party experiencing hysteria
  • NBC report on North Korea cheating…are they cheating?
  • Gordon Chang says possible that Chairman Kim isn’t in charge
  • Supreme Court candidate, Amy Coney Barrett is the persuasion play
  • Dale debates Scott on “children in cages”

 

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

 

The post Episode 127: Oprah, Optimism, North Korea and Supreme Court Picks, Debating Dale appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

The Supreme Team: The Birth of Crack and Hip-Hop, Prince’s Reign of Terror and the Supreme/50 Cent Beef Exposed: Street Legends (Unabridged) – Seth Ferranti

Seth Ferranti - The Supreme Team: The Birth of Crack and Hip-Hop, Prince's Reign of Terror and the Supreme/50 Cent Beef Exposed: Street Legends (Unabridged)  artwork

The Supreme Team: The Birth of Crack and Hip-Hop, Prince’s Reign of Terror and the Supreme/50 Cent Beef Exposed: Street Legends (Unabridged)

Seth Ferranti

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 21.95

Publish Date: March 5, 2018

© ℗ © 2018 Gorilla Convict, LLC

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Soup Tosser J.R. Smith Models Supreme x Nike x NBA Collab [Photos]

J.R. Smith for Supreme

Source: Supreme / Supreme

Maybe Supreme asked J.R. Smith to get his name popping a bit more? Probably not, but the NBA soup tosser is seen modeling the streetwear brand’s latest NBA, and Nike, collab. 

In new photos posted on Instagram, Smith is seen rocking black and white versions a jersey and short combo from Supreme that features all the NBA team logos in an all over design. The number on the back is 94, and there’s a Swoosh right below.

Not saying it’s a particularly fire look, but it will surely sell out in minutes, probably seconds, so holla at your plug A$ AP.

See below, and more flicks, via photographer Ari Marcopoulos on the flip.

Instagram Photo

Instagram Photo

CONTINUED

Photo: Supreme

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Chopin – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Chopin – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: January 25, 2011

© ℗ 2011 X5 Music Group

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Sex Toy Innovation Reigns Supreme at ANME

The ANME Show wrapped today following two days of product debuts and business networking that took place throughout the show’s expansive exhibition areas at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport hotel.
XBIZ.com – Pleasure & Retail

A Love Supreme (Deluxe Edition) – John Coltrane

John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (Deluxe Edition)  artwork

A Love Supreme (Deluxe Edition)

John Coltrane

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 14.99

Release Date: January 1, 1965

© ℗ 2002 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

Odell Beckham Jr. Rocks Supreme Walking Boot Because Swag

[[tmz:video id=”0_5q7g1lyb”]] Somehow Odell Beckham Jr. can even make an injury look cool … ’cause the N.Y. Giants superstar is turning a negative into a positive by sporting a custom Supreme design on his walking boot!! Beckham — who suffered a…

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A Love Supreme – John Coltrane

John Coltrane - A Love Supreme  artwork

A Love Supreme

John Coltrane

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: January 1, 2011

© ℗ 2011 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

Chopin – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Chopin – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: January 25, 2011

© ℗ 2011 X5 Music Group

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Tchaikovsky – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Tchaikovsky – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: November 16, 2010

© ℗ 2010 X5 Music Group

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Classical

Rihanna Matches Her Hair to Her Louis Vuitton x Supreme

Rihanna put her own spin on the season’s most popular fashion collaboration.
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Beyoncé Wears Louis Vuitton x Supreme for a Date Night with Jay-Z—and Takes the Instagram Selfie to the Next Level

Accenting her striped wrap dress with a clutch from the must-have collaboration, Beyoncé showed why she’s queen of accessories.
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Mozart – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Mozart – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: November 21, 2011

© ℗ 2011 X5 Music Group

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Fleetwood Mac Reigns Supreme at Day Two of Classic East Festival

The two days of the Classic East festival in Queens, New York led up to its
Fleetwood Mac climax on Sunday night (Jul. 30) with a mix of assuredness…
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The Darkness Highlights Tenacious D’s Festival Supreme

Sharing the bill with comedians like Kids In The Hall, Bill Burr, Amy Poehler, Richard Cheese & Lounge Against The Machine and…
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Kentucky Clerk Who Refuses To Issue Gay Marriage Licenses Begs Supreme Court For Help

After defying multiple orders to issue marriage licenses to gays and lesbians, a Kentucky clerk is taking her case to the Supreme Court.

Rowan County clerk Kim Davis on Friday filed an emergency request with the court to put a temporary hold on a lower-court ruling that effectively forces her to begin serving gay couples, saying that complying with the order would violate her religious beliefs. 

According to Davis’ petition, her “conscience forbids her from approving” marriage licenses to gay couples “because the prescribed form mandates that she authorize the proposed union and issue a license bearing her own name and imprimatur.”

“She holds an undisputed sincerely-held religious belief that marriage is a union between a man and a woman, only,” the petition continues. “Thus, in her belief, [same-sex marriage] is not, in fact, marriage.”

Equality Case Files, a nonprofit that tracks litigation around same-sex marriage, posted a copy of Davis’ filing on its website. The filing can be read in full here.

Davis’ request was addressed to Justice Elena Kagan, who oversees emergency petitions from Kentucky. Justices from time to time are asked to review such petitions, which are only procedural in scope and are meant to delay implementation of lower-court rulings. Kagan could either act on Davis’ petition on her own or refer it to the full court for adjudication.

The Supreme Court ruled in June that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry. Following the landmark ruling, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear — who was one of the defendants in that case — ordered state clerks to begin issuing marriage licenses to gay and heterosexual couples alike. 

But Davis refused. And then refused again after she was sued and was ordered by a federal court to comply. On Wednesday, an appellate court told her that she had “little or no likelihood” of winning her case.

In her Friday petition to Kagan, Davis argues that adding her “name, authorization, and approval” to marriages by gay couples would amount to a “searing act of validation” that “would forever echo in her conscience.”

The petition goes on: “If Davis’ religious objection cannot be accommodated when Kentucky marriage licenses are available in more than 130 marriage licensing locations … then elected officials have no real religious freedom when they take public office.”

That’s the crux of Davis’ legal argument, but any Supreme Court action in response would be much narrower in scope. Rather than opining on whether Davis’ religious freedom is being violated, a ruling from Kagan or from the full court would be limited to deciding whether to halt the original court order requiring Davis to issue marriage licenses to all couples. 

According to BuzzFeed’s Chris Geidner, that court order is set to go into effect on Monday. 

David Ermold and his partner have been turned away by Davis’ office twice. Ermold told The Associated Press that all the back-and-forth is “getting tedious.”

“We get torn down, built back up, torn down, built back up,” he said. “It’s emotionally draining.” 

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Schubert – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Schubert – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: March 22, 2011

© ℗ 2011 X5 Music Group

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Revive Music Presents Supreme Sonacy, Vol. 1 – Various Artists

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Revive Music Presents Supreme Sonacy, Vol. 1

Various Artists

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: August 7, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Blue Note Records

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Americans Are Still Divided Over Gay Marriage After Supreme Court Decision

NEW YORK (AP) — The Supreme Court’s ruling last month legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide has left Americans sharply divided, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll that suggests support for gay unions may be down slightly from earlier this year.

The poll also found a near-even split over whether local officials with religious objections should be required to issuemarriage licenses to same-sex couples, with 47 percent saying that should be the case and 49 percent say they should be exempt.

 

 

Overall, if there’s a conflict, a majority of those questioned think religious liberties should win out over gay rights, according to the poll. While 39 percent said it’s more important for the government to protect gay rights, 56 percent said protection of religious liberties should take precedence.

The poll was conducted July 9 to July 13, less than three weeks after the Supreme Court ruled states cannot ban same-sex marriage.

According to the poll, 42 percent support same-sex marriage and 40 percent oppose it. The percentage saying they favor legal same-sex marriage in their state was down slightly from the 48 percent who said so in an April poll. In January, 44 percent were in favor.

 

 

Asked specifically about the Supreme Court ruling, 39 percent said they approve and 41 percent said they disapprove.

“What the Supreme Court did is jeopardize our religious freedoms,” said Michael Boehm, 61, an industrial controls engineer from the Detroit area who describes himself as a conservative-leaning independent.

“You’re going to see a conflict between civil law and people who want to live their lives according to their faiths,” Boehm said.

Boehm was among 59 percent of the poll respondents who said wedding-related businesses with religious objections should be allowed to refuse service to gay and lesbian couples. That compares with 52 percent in April.

Also, 46 percent said businesses more generally should be allowed to refuse service to same-sex couples, while 51 percent said that should not be allowed.

Claudette Girouard, 69, a retiree from Chesterfield Township, Michigan, said she is a moderate independent voter who has gradually become supportive of letting same-sex couples marry.

“I don’t see what the big hoopla is,” she said. “If they’re happy, why not?”

Girouard said local officials should be required to perform same-sex marriages, but does not think that wedding-related businesses should be forced to serve same-sex couples.

“If the official doesn’t like what he’s being asked to do, then quit,” she said. “But businesses are kind of independent, so if they have a strong belief against it, there are enough other businesses out there for someone to use.”

 

 

 

The poll found pronounced differences in viewpoints depending on political affiliation.

For example, 65 percent of Democrats, but only 22 percent of Republicans favored allowing same-sex couples to legally marry in their state. And 72 percent of Republicans but just 31 percent of Democrats said local officials with religious objections should be exempt from issuing marriage licenses.

By a 64-32 margin, most Democrats said it’s more important to protect gay rights than religious liberties when the two are in conflict. Republicans said the opposite, by 82-17.

Clarence Wells, 60, a conservative from Rockwood, Tennessee, said he strongly disapproved of the Supreme Court’s ruling. He anticipates friction as gay couples try to exercise their newfound rights and people with religious objections to same-sex marriage balk at accepting them.

“I don’t believe it’s going to go over smoothly,” said Wells. “I think a lot of them will be shunned in church. … I think there will businesses that are going to close, because some people are stubborn enough to not want to deal with it.”

Andrew Chan, 41, a moderate independent from Seattle, said he has tried to remain neutral on same-sex marriage.

“For me, it’s always been about tolerating,” said Chan, who works for a nonprofit organization. “I’ve got friends on both sides.”

Chan said he was happy for gays and lesbians who have found someone they want to marry, and he expressed some wariness toward politicians who might try to roll back the Supreme Court ruling.

“That just creates more division,” he said. “Are we looking to move the country forward or move it backward?”

___

The AP-GfK Poll of 1,004 adults was conducted online July 9 to July 13, using a sample drawn from GfK’s probability-based KnowledgePanel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. Some questions were ask of half samples of respondents and have smaller margins of error. Respondents were first selected randomly using phone or mail survey methods, and later interviewed online. People selected for KnowledgePanel who didn’t otherwise have access to the Internet were provided access at no cost to them.

___

Swanson reported from Washington.

 

 

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A Love Supreme (Deluxe Edition) – John Coltrane

John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (Deluxe Edition)  artwork

A Love Supreme (Deluxe Edition)

John Coltrane

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 19.99

Release Date: January 31, 1965

© ℗ 2002 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

What Was It Like to Be at the Supreme Court When the Marriage Equality Judgement Was Announced?

What was it like at the Supreme Court when the marriage equality judgment was announced?: originally appeared on Quora: The best answer to any question. Ask a question, get a great answer. Learn from experts and access insider knowledge. You can follow Quora on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Answer by Stephanie Vardavas

I arrived at the Supreme Court building at about 9:25 and waded directly into the crowd. It was a big crowd. We're talking hundreds and hundreds of people. The mood was very festive. Many people had brought their kids and even their little dogs. People were reasonably confident of a positive decision but still a little wary. Everyone was friendly and animated. People were handing out little flags from the Human Rights Campaign and the ACLU, "Proud to be a Democrat" stickers, signs that read "America is Ready," and rainbow buttons with President Obama on them. Chatted with the woman next to me, who had brought her teenaged daughter. She said she was from “the reddest, most horrible part of Michigan, but I hope soon that won’t matter anymore.”

There was a lot of jovial speculation about what Justice Scalia's dissent might be like.

MSNBC estimated at least a 10:1 ratio between supporters and opponents of same sex marriage in the crowd. I would peg it at more like 20:1 or even 25:1 or 30:1. There was one guy in a black t-shirt covered with Biblical references to Sodom and Gomorrah. The vast majority of the crowd were gay rights supporters who were there in the hope of seeing justice done. Several of them were Christians with colorful signs proclaiming their support for marriage equality.

In addition to the two above I saw other people with signs that said things like "I'm an Evangelical for Marriage Equality."

There was a guy with a giant homemade sign collage proclaiming that the wages of sin are death, and that HIV/AIDS are God's wrath. There were a few other "Christian" demonstrators but they disappeared relatively quickly after the decision came out.

A minute or two after 10 am we saw "the running of the interns" carrying copies of the decision and dissents to the various TV reporters waiting at their setups on the sidewalk. At about this time somebody who had been able to load SCOTUSblog on his phone started shouting, "We won! 5 to 4!" Everyone started cheering and hugging.

I was standing next to about 20 guys in identical blue t-shirts, who turned out to be the DC Gay Men's Chorus, and just a minute or two later they began to sing the national anthem. Everyone around me joined in. We were all singing the national anthem and by the end of it I was crying like a baby. I am almost 59 years old and in my whole life I have never been prouder to be an American.

Gay Men's Chorus of Washington

They followed it up with a wonderful song called "Make Them Hear You," about fighting for justice. I cried some more.

I started wandering around, listening to snippets of the various standup reports being done by the TV news people, taking pictures for groups of people who wanted to get pictures with the Supreme Court building in the background. I was interviewed by a reporter and cameraperson from ThinkProgress and while I haven't seen the video I believe I was reasonably coherent, although I'm sure my eyes were still full. I'll post it here if I ever find it online.

The Gay Men's Chorus started singing again. They repeated the national anthem and "Make Them Hear You," then added "The Impossible Dream," which was incredibly moving, and then they sang some modified lyrics to "We Shall Overcome." "We shall marry free / we shall marry free / we shall marry free today…"

I never got close enough to hear any of the remarks by the plaintiffs, their counsel, or the lawyers representing the other side. But we had set our TiVo to record MSNBC from 10 am till noon, and I was able to watch that after I got back.

This decision was exceptionally meaningful for me because my old friend Evan Wolfson is the godfather of the marriage equality movement. He is the founder and president of Freedom to Marry, and spoke today on MSNBC about his plan to unwind the organization now that it has achieved its objective.  We've been friends for almost 40 years and I'm so proud of him that I could burst.

Stephanie Vardavas' answer to Who is your favorite LGBT person and why?

tl;dr It was amazing.

More questions on Quora:

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News in Photos: Supreme Court Legalizes Gay Marriage After Landmark 193,000,000-115,000,000 Decision





The Onion

News in Brief: Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Most Buck-Wild Pride Parade Nation’s Ever Seen

WASHINGTON—Following decades of debate over the constitutional right to same-sex marriage, the U.S. Supreme Court today handed down a 5-4 ruling in favor of the most buck-wild, balls-to-the-wall gay pride parade this country has ever seen. “After reviewing the constitutional underpinnings of this case, the court finds that it is discriminatory for states to deny the right to the most out-of-control, bonkers gay pride parade that anyone could possibly imagine,” Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote in his majority opinion, which outlined at length the elaborate floats, billowing rainbow flags, and phalanxes of outlandishly dressed participants, barely scratching the surface of how completely bananas things are about to get. “This decision confirms what should be obvious: The government cannot prevent a nonstop bacchanal surging through the streets of every American city. We’re talking half-naked lesbians covered in body paint, rollerblading homosexuals in brightly colored Native American headdresses and …





The Onion

Twitter’s Best Reactions To The Supreme Court’s Historic Ruling In Favor Of Gay Marriage

Twitter’s Best Reactions To The Supreme Court’s Historic Ruling In Favor Of Gay Marriage

Twitter’s Best Reactions To The Supre…
Twitter had plenty of wonderful things to say in reaction to the Supreme Court’s historic gay marriage ruling.
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Keywords: funny twitter best tweets scotus supreme court gay marriage same sex marriage marriage equality antonin scalia supreme court rules civil rights
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Liberals Just Had An Amazing Week At The Supreme Court

WASHINGTON — The conservative Roberts Supreme Court just gave American liberals the most joyous judicial week they could have asked for.

In a span of just two days, the rightward-leaning court all but settled Obamacare as the law of the land; reaffirmed key components of housing discrimination law meant to protect minorities; and granted gay Americans the right to get married in any state they wish.

Even Texas.

The string of progressive victories left officials hugging and high-fiving at the White House, gay couples crying tears of joy on the courthouse steps, and hardline conservatives wondering on Twitter whether their erstwhile judicial heroes were now traitors.

To recap:

In King v. Burwell, decided Thursday, the court ruled 6-3 to reject a lawsuit brought by conservatives that would have stripped Obamacare subsidies from people who purchased their health coverage on the federal exchanges. A ruling in the plaintiffs’ favor threatened to unravel the system created by the Affordable Care Act, potentially causing millions to lose their health care coverage and wreaking havoc on state insurance markets.

The ruling marked the second time in three years the court had rejected an existential threat to Obamacare. As in the previous case, 2012’s NFIB v. Sebelius, Chief Justice John Roberts joined the liberal wing of the court, this time along with Justice Anthony Kennedy, to keep the president’s signature law intact. Justice Antonin Scalia, writing in a typically scathing dissent, lambasted the majority’s reasoning as “interpretive jiggery-pokery” and “pure applesauce.”

In Texas Dept. of Housing v. Inclusive Communities, also decided Thursday, the court handed a victory to civil rights groups with a 5-4 decision that upheld so-called disparate impact claims. Joined by Kennedy, who often plays the swing vote, the liberal justices ruled that someone suing under fair housing law doesn’t need to prove that a developer or the government knowingly discriminated — only that the policy had a disparate impact, something that can often be demonstrated with statistics.

Had the conservative wing prevailed, plaintiffs bringing claims would have had the far more difficult task of proving intentional discrimination, which typically isn’t documented by those who practice it. Civil rights groups so feared an unfavorable ruling in such a case that the Obama administration sought to keep the question of disparate impact away from the Roberts court.

Finally, in Obergefell v. Hodges, issued Friday, the justices ruled 5-4 to legalize same-sex marriage nationwide, marking a triumph for the gay rights movement decades in the making. The liberal justices, who were joined again by Kennedy, determined that the Constitution grants anyone, regardless of their sexual orientation, the right to marry, effectively invalidating the bans against same-sex unions that still exist in 13 states. “No longer may this liberty be denied,” Kennedy wrote in his highly quotable decision for the majority.

Scalia penned another memorably incredulous dissent, opening by saying he chose to write separately from Roberts in order to “call attention to this Court’s threat to American democracy.” Insisting his concern was not the merit or lack thereof of gay marriage, he wrote that the majority’s “pretentious” and “egotistic” opinion lacked “even a thin veneer of law” and was chock full of “mummeries and straining-to-be-memorable passages.” “[W]hat really astounds is the hubris reflected in today’s judicial Putsch,” he seethed.

The good news for liberals wasn’t confined to just the high-profile cases. In Friday’s Johnson v. United States decision, which was overshadowed by the Obergefell case, the court ruled 8-1 that a section of the Armed Career Criminal Act, which is used to extend prison sentences, is “unconstitutionally vague.” The ruling may compel Congress to address the language of the law as thousands of prisoners seek to have their sentences reduced.

The majority opinion in the Johnson case was written by Scalia, giving progressive court watchers another reason to celebrate. As ThinkProgress’s Ian Millhiser explains, the Johnson opinion makes Scalia one of just two justices who’ve penned as many as eight majority opinions this term. If tradition is any indication, then Scalia probably won’t be writing another majority opinion before the court breaks, likely leaving the duty to one of his less conservative colleagues.

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Ted Cruz Wants To Be Able To Vote Out Supreme Court Justices

After calling the last day “some of the darkest 24 hours in our nation’s history,” Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) is now calling for Supreme Court justices to face elections.

In a National Review op-ed published Friday, Cruz chastised the high court for its decisions to reject a major challenge to Obamacare and to legalize same-sex marriage nationwide.

“Both decisions were judicial activism, plain and simple,” Cruz writes. “Both were lawless.”

To challenge that “judicial activism,” Cruz said he is proposing a constitutional amendment to require Supreme Court justices to face retention elections every eight years.

“The decisions that have deformed our constitutional order and have debased our culture are but symptoms of the disease of liberal judicial activism that has infected our judiciary,” Cruz writes. “A remedy is needed that will restore health to the sick man in our constitutional system. Rendering the justices directly accountable to the people would provide such a remedy.”

Under Cruz’s proposed amendment, justices would have to be approved by a majority of American voters as well as by the majority of voters in least half of the states. If they failed to reach the required approval rating, they would be removed from office and barred from serving on the Supreme Court in the future.

Cruz, who is running for president in 2016, was among many Republican candidates criticizing the justices after a strong week for liberals at the court.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R), who is expected to jump in the presidential race soon, also offered up a proposed constitutional fix to combat the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision. In a statement, Walker argued for an amendment to define marriage as between one man and one woman — a proposal Cruz has also floated.

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White House Goes Rainbow After Gay Marriage Supreme Court Decision

The White House was lit up in the colors of the rainbow on Friday night to celebrate the Supreme Court’s historic ruling that made same-sex marriage legal across all 50 states.

“Tonight, the White House was lit to demonstrate our unwavering commitment to progress and equality, here in America and around the world,” the White House said in a statement. “The pride colors reflect the diversity of the LGBT community, and tonight, these colors celebrate a new chapter in the history of American civil rights.”

wh rainbow

White House lit with rainbow colors on Friday, June 26, 2015. (Photo: Igor Bobic, The Huffington Post

Hundreds gathered outside the fences to view the colors and celebrate the ruling, according to HuffPost’s Igor Bobic.

A bold decorating choice, but sometimes, you just gotta go with your heart. And it matched the mood around the nation, and the double rainbow that appeared over the White House not long after the Supreme Court’s ruling.

Tonight. #lovewins

A photo posted by Pete Souza (@petesouza) on

DSLR version.

A photo posted by Pete Souza (@petesouza) on

Another iPhone version from tonight. #lovewins

A photo posted by Pete Souza (@petesouza) on

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Sir Ian McKellen: Supreme Court’s Decision to Legalize Same-Sex Marriage Is ”a Great Relief”

Ian McKellenWe already know Sir Ian McKellen’s celebrations today included confetti and some Queen, but the actor also chatted with MSNBC today to discuss the exciting news concerning the Supreme…


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John Kasich Says He’ll ‘Abide By’ Supreme Court’s Upcoming Gay Marriage Decision

DES MOINES, Iowa — Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) said Wednesday that if the Supreme Court strikes down his state’s ban on same-sex marriage, he’ll “abide” by the decision.

“If the Supreme Court rules another way, they are the court and the law of the land, and we will abide by it,” Kasich, a potential 2016 presidential contender, told reporters ahead of an appearance at a caucus candidate forum. The two-term governor has not yet announced he’s in the race.

The Supreme Court is set to issue a decision any day in Obergefell v Hodges, which could strike down state bans on same-sex marriage. The lead plaintiff is Ohio resident Jim Obergefell, who wanted to be listed as the surviving spouse on his husband’s death certificate. Obergefell married his partner of 20 years, John Arthur, aboard a medical jet in 2013, while Arthur was dying from ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Arthur died that October, three months after the couple filed their lawsuit.

Kasich on Wednesday made clear that he continues to believe in what he called “traditional marriage.”

“Too many people worry about polls, election results, focus groups and all this other nonsense,” he said. “I’ve given you my answer. I stand by traditional marriage, but we will see what the court does.”

Kasich’s promise to respect the Supreme Court ruling differs from other GOP presidential hopefuls. In an interview with the Washington Examiner last month, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) said that if elected president, he would take executive action to protect individuals who don’t believe in same-sex marriage.

Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.), a longtime foe of gay rights, has said he would “fight back” as president if the Supreme Court issues a ruling with which he disagrees. Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) has said states could simply ignore what the court decides.

Kasich made his debut in Iowa on Wednesday, his first public appearance in the state in 16 years — putting an end to some speculation that he would skip the Hawkeye State and focus on the New Hampshire primary.

“When I was here 16-17 years ago, I might get three of you to come here to hear me,” he told a packed crowd at an event hosted by the Greater Des Moines Partnership. “I’m kind of amazed how many of you are here. … I’m not giving away canned hams today, just to let you know.”

A Bloomberg/Des Moines Register poll out earlier this month showed Kasich polling at 2 percent among likely Iowa caucus-goers.

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Debussy – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Debussy – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: February 8, 2011

© ℗ 2011 X5 Music Group

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MC Supreme — Killed in PCH Accident … Same Spot as Caitlyn Jenner’s Fatal Crash

’90s rapper MC Supreme was killed on the exact same stretch of the Pacific Coast Highway … where Caitlyn Jenner had her fatal accident. Supreme … who’s biggest hit was “Black in America” … was sitting in a parked car on the shoulder of the…

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1990s Rapper MC Supreme Killed In Car Crash

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — Rapper MC Supreme, best known for his 1990 single “Black In America,” has died in a car crash in Malibu.

The Los Angeles County coroner’s officials said 47-year-old Dewayne Coleman was killed Saturday when a pickup truck slammed into parked car on the shoulder Pacific Coast Highway. Coleman was pronounced dead at the scene; a woman passenger in his car taken to a hospital with unspecified injuries.

Coleman released “Black In America” on the compilation album “We’re All In the Same Gang.” It featured the hit anti-violence song that shares the album’s name by the West Coast Rap All-Stars.

Coleman’s sister, Irene, told City News Service her brother was dedicated to working with young people and steering them from gangs.

The pickup driver was arrested on suspicion of DUI.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: November 30, 2010

© ℗ 2010 X5 Music Group

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Chopin – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Chopin – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: January 25, 2011

© ℗ 2011 X5 Music Group

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Supreme Court Overturns Man’s Conviction for Facebook ‘Threats’

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a big decision that overturns the conviction of Anthony Elonis for making threats on Facebook against…
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Rick Santorum Will Fight The Supreme Court If It Legalizes Gay Marriage

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum said on Sunday that if the Supreme Court legalizes gay marriage later this year, he would dispute the decision, saying that the court “doesn’t have the final word.”

“Of course I’d fight it,” he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “Roe versus Wade was decided 30 some years ago, and I continue to fight that, because I think the court got it wrong. And I think if the court decides this case in error, I will continue to fight, as we have on the issue of life … We’re not bound by what nine people say in perpetuity.”

Santorum justified his stance by arguing that the executive and legislative branches are obligated to challenge the judicial branch.

“I think it’s important to understand that the Supreme Court doesn’t have the final word. It has its word. Its word has validity. But it’s important for Congress and the president, frankly, to push back when the Supreme Court gets it wrong,” he said.

The Supreme Court last month heard oral arguments on Obergefell v. Hodges, a case involving whether or not state bans on marriage equality are constitutional. It is likely that the court will rule in favor of marriage equality when the decision is announced sometime in June. Since its landmark decisions overturning the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Proposition 8 in 2013, the court has refused to hear a number of appeals on state marriage equality bans, and in oral arguments, justices cited the growing public opinion in favor of gay marriage.

But among the GOP presidential field, several candidates have contended that state legislatures, not courts, should decide on whether or not to accept gay marriage. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) even introduced a constitutional amendment protecting states that define marriage as between a man and a woman.

As a social conservative, Santorum has long been a stalwart opponent of marriage equality. He has also said that he would not attend a gay wedding, even if it involved a close family member or friend.

“I just felt like as a person of my faith, that would be something that would be a violation of my faith. I would love them and support them, but I would not participate in that ceremony,” he said.

Watch Santorum’s interview in the video.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Jesse Tyler Fergusuon’s Genius Plan to Get the Supreme Court to Legalize Gay Marriage

The U.S. Supreme Court will likely rule next month on a case that could determine whether same-sex marriage is a constitutional right. In an effort to sway the nation’s top justices, Jesse Tyler Fergusuon has…




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Tchaikovsky – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Tchaikovsky – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: November 16, 2010

© ℗ 2010 X5 Music Group

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Supreme Save The Date with Jesse Tyler Ferguson

Supreme Save The Date with Jesse Tyler Ferguson

Supreme Save The Date with Jesse Tyle… 3:03
Modern Family’s Jesse Tyler Ferguson tells you how you can convince the Supreme Court Justices to vote for Marriage Equality.
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In Four Supreme Court Clashes Over 15 Years, a Consensus for Equality Emerges

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Photo by Joshua Glick

The giddy atmosphere outside the Supreme Court Tuesday afternoon was only slightly more festive than the mood in the courtroom itself. As expected, civil rights legend Mary Bonauto knocked it out of the park for marriage equality. But something bigger was in the air — a sense that history wasn’t just turning but had, in some basic sense, turned.

It wasn’t only that the other side’s arguments have imploded, though there was that.

John Bursch, the Michigan lawyer charged with defending discrimination, spent most of his time arguing that gay people marrying will somehow convey that marriage is now about couples rather than children (despite the hundreds of thousands of gay families raising kids), which in turn will cause straight people to have more children out of wedlock.

Also, if a woman weighs the same as a duck, she is made of wood and is therefore a witch.

Bursch did, however, avoid the ever less plausible argument that the freedom to marry is somehow anti-religion — no doubt aware of the quickening embrace of equality by mainstream denominations and millions of religious Americans. That didn’t stop Justice Scalia from repeatedly insisting that ministers could be forced to perform same-sex wedding services as a condition of exercising civil marriage authority. You know, like rabbis are now forced to marry interfaith couples.

That, and a few lingering questions on polygamy, is really about all they have left.

Beyond the lopsided merits, there was a powerful sense in the courtroom that our community has broken through. Even the conservative justices engaged seriously and respectfully (well, Scalia will be Scalia). And a majority of justices bluntly stated their impatience with arguments that fail to recognize the dignity and equality of gay families. It felt like a cultural moment had arrived — confirmation of acceptance and respect that would have been unthinkable a generation ago.

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Photo by Joshua Glick

Contrast the 1986 oral argument in Bowers v. Hardwick, in which a constitutional challenge to criminalization of private intimate conduct was mischaracterized as being about a “right to commit sodomy” and constitutional scholar Larry Tribe was peppered with hypotheticals about sex in public toilets. I wasn’t there for Bowers, thank goodness, but at three other oral arguments over the last fifteen years (all in cases where my firm submitted briefs), I was privileged to witness progress unfold towards Tuesday’s culmination.

First came Dale v. Boy Scouts, in 2000, in which Evan Wolfson (also basking this week in well-earned marriage glory) faced down a skeptical Supreme Court on behalf of James Dale, an Eagle Scout and junior scoutmaster tossed from Scouting when he came out in college. In those days, the Scouts still argued that only heterosexual boys could be “clean” and “morally straight,” and LGBT advocates felt compelled to submit social science briefs explaining that gay people were not mentally ill pederasts — what we used to call the “Homo 101” brief.

On the ground, Dale was a game changer, jump-starting awareness of the irrationality of antigay discrimination. But sitting in court, there was a sense of uphill effort as the justices seemed more concerned with protecting Scouting’s right to enforce its own moral code than with preventing discrimination — previewing the Court’s ruling that the Scouts were a private association immune from civil rights regulation.

Just three years later, when Lawrence v. Texas came before the Court, much had changed. Seventeen years after Bowers, sodomy laws appeared even more obviously archaic, and the issue presented no First Amendment complications. The cause was now represented by Paul Smith — an openly gay law firm partner well known to the justices as a former law clerk and SCOTUS regular.

The argument this time felt more like a tutorial than a battle for respect. There were still some wince-worthy moments — as when Justice Scalia asked Smith whether states could bar gay kindergarten teachers to keep kids off “the path of homosexuality.” But Smith’s insider status made it easier for him to tell the Court how wrong they had gotten it in Bowers — reframing the issue in universal terms tied to fundamental American values of privacy and autonomy: “Most Americans would be shocked to find out that their decision to engage in sexual intimacy with another person in their own home might lead to a knock on the door” and a criminal prosecution.

The Court listened. Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion struck down the Texas law as a violation of personal liberty and expressly overturned Bowers. The Court confirmed that gay people, like any other group, are entitled to respect for their intimate, private choices and free to invoke Constitutional principles “in their own search for greater freedom.” Justice Scalia’s dissent lamented — presciently — that rejecting moral disapproval as a ground for sodomy laws also eliminated the main argument against recognizing the freedom to marry for same-sex couples.

How right he was. Of course, work on marriage equality (masterminded by trailblazers Bonauto and Wolfson) had already begun years earlier in Hawaii, Vermont, and of course Massachusetts, where same-sex couples began marrying in May 2004, less than a year after the Lawrence decision.

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Photo by Joshua Glick

It took nearly a decade to get back before SCOTUS, as marriage equality advanced in fits and starts in courts, legislatures, and ballot referendums across the country. By the time United States v. Windsor hit the Court in 2013 — challenging DOMA’s federal recognition ban — the tide had shifted, with nine states allowing marriage and public support topping fifty percent.

That momentum was reflected at oral argument, where the pro-equality side for the first time seemed to have the upper hand right out of the box. Even before Robbie Kaplan rose to argue for Edie Windsor, Justice Ginsberg had set the tone with her “skim milk marriage” quip and Justice Kagan had stopped Paul Clement’s defense of DOMA in its tracks by showing that Congress had been motivated by the kind of moral disapproval rejected in Lawrence. This was followed by U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli arguing DOMA’s unconstitutionality on behalf of the Obama administration.

What a change from Evan Wolfson’s brave, solitary stand. When Kaplan took the podium, it was Chief Justice Roberts who seemed on the defensive — acknowledging what Kaplan described as a “sea change” in attitudes towards gay families and noting that politicians were “falling over themselves to endorse” marriage equality. When he tried to flip the issue and suggest that the gay community was now too powerful to require heightened constitutional protection, Kaplan recounted lost marriage battles and other recent discrimination — driving home that the “sea change” was a product of evolving moral understanding rather than political clout.

Windsor, of course, struck down the federal recognition portion of DOMA and sparked an astonishing two years of further litigation, legislation, and public education in which marriage has grown from nine to thirty-seven states and public support for the freedom to marry has hit sixty-three percent nationwide.

All of which brought us to Tuesday, where the argument felt even more one-sided than Windsor. Bonauto, with her trademark quiet intensity, eloquently set forth how exclusion from civil marriage needlessly demeans and harms gay people and their families. The conservative justices pushed back on the length of time marriage had been limited to different-sex couples, but Bonauto explained other ways that marriage has evolved over time and evoked Lawrence in arguing that “times can blind and it takes time to see stereotypes and to see the common humanity of people who had once been ignored or excluded.”

And as to the perennial question of “who” gets to decide marriage, Bonauto beautifully summed up that “it’s not about the Court versus the States. It’s about the individual making the choice to marry and with whom to marry, or the government.”

There was some anxiety when Justice Kennedy, too, questioned changing a definition of marriage that had been around for “millennia” (actually, not true) — but he later re-emphasized the concern he expressed in Windsor for the well-being of children of gay parents and his moral understanding that same-sex couples seek to share in the “nobility and sacredness of marriage.”

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Mary Bonauto and co-counsel meet the press. Photo by Jeffrey S. Trachtman

No one wants to jinx it, but most observers expect another favorable 5-4 vote and have the champagne on ice for the kind of emotional celebration that marked Pride 2011 (when marriage was enacted in New York) and 2013 (following the Windsor decision).

Winning marriage is, of course, just a step along the road to justice. Marriage doesn’t serve everyone equally, and there is plenty left to do to protect LGBTQ youth and elders, achieve equality for our trans and genderqueer neighbors, and advance broader social justice. For many of us in D.C., the events in nearby Baltimore gave the day a bittersweet flavor. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t savor this moment of impending triumph, but let’s keep it in perspective: no rest until everyone is free, safe, and equal.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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3 Rights Gay Couples Will Get If Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Gay Marriage

In Washington, D.C., today, the U.S. Supreme Court started hearing arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, a case that could determine whether same-sex marriage is a constitutional right. While the court likely won't rule until June,…




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Sly Stone — Lawyer Suffers Supreme KO From Fake Diana Ross

Sly Stone’s lawyer got the Supreme diva treatment outside court — taking a punch to the face from a woman claiming to be Diana Ross.  Law enforcement sources tell TMZ … minutes before Stone and his lawyer entered an L.A. courtroom Friday — a…

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Mozart – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Mozart – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: November 2, 2010

© ℗ 2010 X5 Music Group

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Beethoven – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Beethoven – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: December 14, 2010

© ℗ 2010 X5 Music Group

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Bach – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters – Various Artists

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Bach – 100 Supreme Classical Masterpieces: Rise of the Masters

Various Artists

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: December 28, 2010

© ℗ 2010 X5 Music Group

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Supreme New Year’s Resolution: Stop the Harm to Families of Denying the Freedom to Marry

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Photo by Jeffrey S. Trachtman

The Supreme Court will decide shortly whether to review and decide a marriage equality case before its current term ends in June. Many are praying for this, eager to wrap up an issue long past the tipping point that folks are sick of discussing.

But there is a more important reason the Court should act now: to halt the severe harm that continuing denial of the freedom to marry inflicts every day on countless same-sex couples, their children, and their extended families and friends. It matters whether this harm ends in June 2015 or lingers into the future.

The long-building national consensus for marriage equality reached critical mass after the Supreme Court’s 2013 Windsor decision held it unconstitutional for the federal government to refuse to recognize the lawful marriages of same-sex couples. A flood of state and federal court decisions over the last eighteen months has applied Windsor to invalidate the marriage bans of the majority of states.

The first batch of these cases reached the Supreme Court in September, in the form of requests for review by states whose laws had been struck down. But because all the decisions went in one direction, there was no legal conflict for the Court to resolve — the usual basis for granting “cert.”

The Court’s denial of review delayed the nationwide elimination of discrimination and its harms — but it also made all those favorable decisions final, allowing marriages to go forward in five more states (up from 19) and setting off a ripple effect that has now brought the freedom to marry to thirty-five states (with Florida coming on line in a few days as number 36), plus four with pro-equality rulings on appeal. In comparison, only thirty-four states permitted interracial couples to marry when Loving v. Virginia was decided in 1967.

More recently, a handful of courts have gone the other way — most significantly, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, which in one fell swoop in November reversed pro-equality rulings in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee. Marriage rights advocates are now asking the Supreme Court to review this decision and one issued by a federal district judge in Louisiana upholding that state’s marriage ban. Their chances are good, because the Sixth Circuit created a classic “circuit split,” though it is still possible the Court will opt to let litigation play out first in the remaining states.

Denial of review now would have no silver lining. It would simply entrench discrimination in five states, perpetuating needless injury to thousands of families. That’s why several organizations advocating for the rights of same-sex couples and their families (including Freedom to Marry, Family Equality Council, and PFLAG) filed a brief (prepared by my law firm) urging the Supreme Court to grant review and halt the ongoing harms of marriage discrimination.

In the 15 states without the freedom to marry, families suffer concrete harm every day, deprived of literally hundreds of government benefits and protections as well as private benefits awarded based on marital status.

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Steven Rains and Don Condit courtesy of Freedom to Marry

For example, Steven Rains and Don Condit of Fort Worth, Texas, together for 31 years, married in California in 2008 but were treated as unmarried back home in Texas. When Don died unexpectedly, Steven was omitted from his death certificate, excluded from making decisions about his cremation, and is now deprived of surviving spouse benefits based on Dan’s military service and private pensions.

Another couple, April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse of Hazel Park, Michigan, have been together more than eight years and are raising three adopted special needs children. Because Michigan bars same-sex couples from marrying and all unmarried couples from adopting together, Jayne adopted two of the children herself and April adopted the third — but neither is recognized as a parent of the other’s children. This deprives all three children of the protections and stability of having two legal parents.

Exclusion from marriage also inflicts severe dignitary injury — the impact of being treated as second-class citizens with second class relationships. These injuries can be quite tangible, particularly the psychological harm to children of being told by society that their families are less real and worthy of respect than those of different-sex parents. In Windsor, the Supreme Court recognized that failing to respect existing marriages “demeans” couples and “humiliates” their kids. Total exclusion from marriage is at least as demeaning and humiliating.

Even couples deemed married in their home states are harmed by continuing marriage discrimination in other states. Every time they travel to a non-recognition state they risk being treated as unmarried in the event of a medical or other emergency. They need to obtain second parent adoptions or create living wills and powers of attorney to try to replicate the rights they would have automatically if their marriages were respected. Couples who fail to anticipate these problems may face grievous results, such as exclusion from the hospital bedside of a dying spouse.

These harms happen every day and may be catastrophic — robbing a surviving spouse of a lifetime of earned retirement benefits or leaving a child parentless when the biological or adoptive parent dies and the state does not recognize the surviving partner as a parent.

There is simply no good reason to inflict these risks and harms on American families for another day, much less another year. The country is ready for full recognition of the freedom to marry. Let’s hope the Supreme Court is as well.
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A Love Supreme – John Coltrane

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A Love Supreme

John Coltrane

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: January 31, 1965

© ℗ 2011 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Cellist Yo-Yo Ma plays Supreme Court

Aural argument? Yo-Yo Ma plays 300-year-old cello for Supreme Court justices
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Supreme Booty

When casting girls for his intense POV+ gonzo scenes, insatiable director Mike Adriano puts one requirement at the top of his list: A big, beautiful ass. Mikes Supreme Booty stars four incredible specimens of gluteal superiority in nonstop tease, fucking and raunchy backdoor action. Everything Mikes discerning fans could want from an Adriano movie is here sloppy blow jobs; nasty rimming; face sitting; ass-to-mouth cocksucking; sphincter stretching with Mikes signature speculum; and delicious assfuckery of the thickest, most squeezable buns in the business! First is gorgeous blonde bimbette Britney Amber. She doesnt have a lot of anal experience, but she treats the directors thick prick to some slobbery, gagging deep-throat attention, and soon hes ramming his fat pole up Britneys mighty ass. Next, stunning Cuban bombshell Luna Star squats over Mikes face, grinding her perfect rump on his probing tongue. He pumps his pole inside Lunas silky cunt and spurts a messy load into her mouth. Adorable, 18-year-old Latina Audrey Aguilera gives mike her video anal cherry! The jelly-assed, baby-faced youngster shows off her plump, all-natural boobs; she lets Mike tongue-fuck her tender anus and plunder her inexperienced rectum. Finally, stunning high school student Jillian Brookes is fresh in the adult biz. Mike slathers her sturdy rump with lube and shoves his raging boner into her teen pussy, which oozes creamy juice as shes fucked. In the hierarchy of derrieres, thick curves and hungry holes are the criteria, and Mike Adrianos Supreme Booty is the hottest sport in the land.

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