Episode 187 Scott Adams: Have We Reached Peak Trump Derangement Syndrome?

Topics: 

  • Anti-Trumpers pushing back against the TDS of other anti-Trumpers
    • Preet Bharara talking to Bill Maher
    • Rachel Maddow talking to John Brennan
    • Katy Tur talking to Michelle Goldberg
  • Strategy and tips for how to not be embarrassed
    • Ego is not who you are
    • Use your ego as a tool you ramp up or down as needed
    • President Trump does this extremely well
  • Scott’s happiness hypothesis

 

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

The post Episode 187 Scott Adams: Have We Reached Peak Trump Derangement Syndrome? appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Episode 141: Trump Derangement Syndrome, Mind-Reading, Climate Change and Racism

Topics: 

  • Josh Rogin demonstrates TDS, mind-reading illusion and moving the goalposts
  • President Trump meeting Putin…what will happen?
  • CO2 emissions dramatically reduced by U.S.
  • Climate change sense of urgency has largely evaporated
  • Elon Musk solves problems…why are people going after him?
  • Implementing Hawk Newsome’s suggestion…
  • “I reject racism in all its forms”

 

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

The post Episode 141: Trump Derangement Syndrome, Mind-Reading, Climate Change and Racism appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Episode 128: Why Trump Derangement Syndrome is so Strong

Topics: 

  • The enemy press
  • Delusions of the winning team vs. the losing team
  • College admission race requirement rules
  • The Scott Adams college course curriculum

 

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

 

The post Episode 128: Why Trump Derangement Syndrome is so Strong appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Episode 69: How to Guide a Victim out of Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS)

Topics:

  • Whiteboard discussion
  • TDS Escape Route
  • “Animals” comment hoax
  • Charlottesville hoax
  • Judge Curiel hoax
  • Arm mocking hoax
  • McCain joke hoax
  • Mexican “rapists” hoax
  • Russia hoax
  • Reasons are rationalizations
  • What do Gaza people want, first thing they mention?

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

For persuasion-related content in book form, see my bestselling book, Win Bigly.

The post Episode 69: How to Guide a Victim out of Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS) appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Memento Mori – Gemini Syndrome


Memento Mori
Gemini Syndrome

Release Date:
August 19, 2016
Total Songs:
15

Genre:
Metal

Price:
$ 9.99

Copyright
℗ 2016 Another Century, a division of The Century Media Family Inc.


iTunes 100 New Releases

Berlin Syndrome – Cate Shortland

Cate Shortland - Berlin Syndrome  artwork

Berlin Syndrome

Cate Shortland

Genre: Thriller

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: May 26, 2017


A passionate holiday romance takes an unexpected and sinister turn when Australian photojournalist Clare (Teresa Palmer) wakes up one morning locked in Andi's Berlin apartment—and he has no intention of letting her go again…ever.

© © 2017 AQUARIUS FILMS PTY LIMITED

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Horror

Memento Mori – Gemini Syndrome


Memento Mori
Gemini Syndrome

Release Date:
August 19, 2016
Total Songs:
15

Genre:
Metal

Price:
$ 9.99

Copyright
℗ 2016 Another Century, a division of The Century Media Family Inc.


iTunes 100 New Releases

Narcissistic Accuser Syndrome

The word “narcissist” gets tossed around a lot, especially when Donald Trump is in the news. That word can mean at least three different things, depending on who is saying it. For example, calling someone a narcissist could mean…

1. I don’t know what big words mean, but I use them anyway. (That’s at least 30% of cases.)

Or…

2. The target of the accusation has “Narcissistic Personality Disorder” as defined by the Mayo Clinic to include these traits:

  • Inflated sense of importance
  • Deep need for admiration 
  • Lack of empathy for others
  • Fragile self-esteem that’s vulnerable to the slightest criticism

Or…

3. The person doing the accusing has “Narcissistic Accuser Syndrome” as I define to have these characteristics:

  • Dislike of confident, successful people.
  • Hallucinating that you have the diagnostic skills of a trained psychiatrist.
  • Hallucinating the ability to determine a stranger’s level of empathy, and their need for admiration, based on limited evidence seen out of context.
  • Inability to distinguish between a smart operator with a strategy of aggressive response to critics versus a person with fragile self-esteem.
  • Inability to understand that labeling one individual with an inflated sense of importance and fragile self-esteem at the same time is harder to explain than you want it to be.
  • A deep desire to rationalize one’s own lack of success by imagining the only way that other people attain it is with the help of some sort of personality disorder.

Did I write this defensive-sounding post because I’m a narcissist? I hope so, because that’s what I strive to be.

I’m a big fan of being admired, assuming I did something worthy. I find the goodwill of others to be one of several sources of personal motivation, and a legitimate one. Am I allowed to make the world a better place and enjoy the fact that others appreciate the effort? That seems like a reasonable deal for everyone. If you do something good for the world, I promise to admire you, and I hope you enjoy the feeling. Maybe it will encourage you to do more good stuff.

I also work continuously to keep my sense of importance as high as possible, for health reasons, for happiness reasons, and for career reasons. That sort of attitude made me think I could become a famous cartoonist despite having no obvious artistic talent and no training whatsoever. I consider my self-inflated sense of importance an asset. It serves me well, often.

Sometimes strangers on the Internet accuse me of having a lack of empathy because I have the ability to compartmentalize like a robot. But the reality is that I can’t even watch sad movies without being emotionally disturbed. If you can watch movies that involve human or animal suffering, and enjoy the experience, I’m not sure that puts you at the top of the empathy list. But compartmentalizing is a good skill to have, and one that I practice.

I am often accused of being thin-skinned because I respond aggressively to critics. Regular readers know my strategy of aggressive response is intended to increase the perceived penalty for unreasonable criticisms.

Does it work?

Gawker, Jezebel, and HuffPo have not put me through the outragism grinder recently. Coincidence? Maybe. But I also think they don’t want me to keep labeling them “bottom-feeders” on a site with high SEO visibility.

If you think criticism bothers me deeply, keep in mind that my explicit business model for this blog involves embarrassing myself publicly and inviting criticism of everything I write. Every day. Good writing should be a little dangerous.

Does anyone want to be a narcissist with me? It’s awesome.

Speaking of writing, I wrote a few books. The latest one is the best.


Scott Adams Blog

Digital Distraction Syndrome

When I was a kid I couldn’t concentrate on homework while music was playing. The music was a distraction.

Today I often need to put on headphones and play loud music in order to concentrate on work.

What changed? Was it me?

Here’s another data point, still in anecdotal territory, obviously. My stepson fought like a wounded badger for the right to play music while doing homework. He insisted it helped him concentrate, as it does for me as an adult. But his mom and I argued that music was a distraction to learning.

We might have been wrong.

My hypothesis, subject to your sage review, is that the baseline stimulation of normal life has become a higher distraction than loud music blaring in both ears. Music once created a distraction in a quiet world. Now music creates a bit of a buffer from the baseline circus of your normal existence. And in this context I do not mean the noise of the outside world so much as the mental distraction of simply knowing you might have a message if only you looked. Stuff like that.

Music is somewhat predictable, especially for familiar songs, and it soon blends into the background of your mind, creating (in my experience) a sort of force field that keeps away the outside world. It is a defense against the distractions the world has inserted in your mind.

It goes without saying that our digital devices are both awesome in function and distracting in nature. No one wants to return to pre-digital days. But we do need to be conscious of the entire impact of our new tech, not just the shiny bits.

At the risk of being an alarmist, I’m going to go on record as saying Digital Distraction Syndrome (my name for it) is among the biggest health threats in the industrial world. The distractions of the digital age increase our stress, and stress makes us sick and crazy.

90% of the adults I know are on drugs because of what they think is the normal stress of life. Here I am counting the doctor-prescribed meds, the binge-drinking on weekends, the medical marijuana, porn, tobacco, wine before dinner, or even the exercise addiction that gooses the body to release feel-good chemistry. 

How’d we get here?

Our largest and most important tech companies are literally in the business of distracting you with their advertisements and their apps. They design their products to maximize distraction, not efficiency, because your distraction is their profit. Distractions make you less effective, which makes you more stressed, which kicks the hell out of your general health. Then you die.

In other words, our most important technology companies are killing you. 

For money. 

Like the tobacco companies. 

Is that comparison too extreme? According to the CDC, smoking will cause one person out of 13 in my country to die prematurely. Stress will probably get one-third of us, but we will label those deaths with whatever symptoms the doctor saw last, such as cardiovascular disease.

Our digital distractions are not the sole cause of our stress. But my best guess is that it accounts for about half of it in this day and age.

The tech companies’ defense (one assumes) is that no one is forcing you to do anything, and the risks and benefits are fully disclosed. That’s the tobacco defense as well. If you want to smoke, that is up to you and your free will. Likewise, no one needs all of these digital distractions to survive. You can go without your smartphone if you want. Obviously you would be living like a savage who can’t figure out how to get a ride home or pay for food, but you could do it. With your free will and stuff.

Don’t get me wrong. I think Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, and the other tech giants are huge assets to humankind. (Okay, not the last three.) I admire most of them on many levels. I love their products most of the time. I can’t imagine living without them.

And that’s the point. They own me. Choice is an illusion unless I want to go full-caveman.

If we could reboot civilization from the beginning and engineer a perfect economy, I doubt we would agree to give away our brain cycles to every company that asks. Here’s how that meeting would go:

Primitive Guy 1: “Let’s build a vibrant economy that depends on distracting people from the things they want to do every minute of every day.”

Primitive Guy 2: “Excuse me while I push this spear through your stupid head.”

That plan would have never gotten off the ground. A civilization can only get to the point we are at right now by evolving over time. A few ads on roadside billboards probably reduced the boredom of driving. No one got hurt.

Today the tech companies blast your neurons with so many stimulants – all of them science-tested for maximum impact – that all of us are operating on sensory overload and inching toward insanity.

My best guess on the eventual death toll from Digital Distraction Syndrome is in the low tens-of-millions. For comparison, the second World War only killed 60 million. I think we’ll pass that mark with ease.

Am I wrong?

Scott

In Top Tech Blog, brainiacs are turning sunlight and water into fuel. What??? And how about buying a personal indoor farm run by robots? That’s an option now.

The seventh book reviewer in this list is a tough grader. He’s talking about this book.

image


Scott Adams Blog

Style Notes: Prince George Harassed by Paparazzi; Model with Down Syndrome to Walk NYFW


TGIF.

read more



Style

Pound Syndrome – Hopsin


Pound Syndrome
Hopsin

Release Date:
July 24, 2015
Total Songs:
14

Genre:
Hip-Hop

Price:
$ 11.99

Copyright
℗ 2015 Funk Volume, LLC. Manufactured and distributed by Warner Bros. Records Inc.


iTunes 100 New Releases

Pound Syndrome – Hopsin

Hopsin - Pound Syndrome  artwork

Pound Syndrome

Hopsin

Genre: Hip-Hop

Price: $ 11.99

Release Date: July 24, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Funk Volume, LLC. Manufactured and distributed by Warner Bros. Records Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Pound Syndrome – Hopsin


Pound Syndrome
Hopsin

Release Date:
July 24, 2015
Total Songs:
14

Genre:
Hip-Hop

Price:
$ 11.99

Copyright
℗ 2015 Funk Volume, LLC. Manufactured and distributed by Warner Bros. Records Inc.


iTunes 100 New Releases

Movie Voice Syndrome

Movie Voice Syndrome

Movie Voice Syndrome 2:24
What happens when an unemployed mate only speaks in movie trailer voice
Submitted by: foilarmsandhog
Regular
Keywords: foil arms and hog movie trailer voice irish comedy syndrome
Views: 5,590

Funny or Die | Funny Videos, Funny Video Clips, Funny Pictures

Hopsin “Pound Syndrome” Album Release Date

The Funk Volume rapper-producer also dropped a straight-to-video single for "Crown Me" with the announcement.


HipHopDX News

Probing the “Jumping From the Frying Pan Into the Fire” Syndrome

When someone emerges from the devastation of a broken relationship they are vulnerable to making unwise decisions because they are alone, desperate and craving comfort and compassion from other human sources. And sometimes they are automatically drawn to characteristics that they have become accustomed to over the course of the recent past.
Relationships:Dating Articles from EzineArticles.com

Aspiring Teen Model Challenges Society’s Stereotypes Of Down Syndrome: ‘Exposure Will Create Acceptance’

Madeline Stuart is an 18-year-old aspiring model, and she’s here to challenge society’s rigid definition of what “beautiful” is.

Thank you for your support, please share my page and invite your friends to like it. I love you all xx

Posted by Madeline getting Downs to modelling on Friday, May 8, 2015

Madeline, who lives in Brisbane, Australia, has Down syndrome. She writes on her Facebook page that she believes “modeling will help change [society’s] view of people with Down syndrome.”

“Exposure will help to create acceptance,” she says.

According to WPVI-TV, Madeline struggled with her weight as a youngster. Thanks to healthy eating and exercise, the teen lost 45 pounds. Madeline now dances, swims and does gymnastics and cheerleading.

Madeline’s mom, Rosanne Stuart, said she hopes her daughter will inspire other individuals with Down syndrome to make similarly positive lifestyle choices. Studies have suggested that children with Down syndrome are more prone to be overweight.

“People with Down syndrome can do anything,” Stuart told Buzzfeed. “They just do it at their own pace. Give them a chance and you will be rewarded beyond your greatest expectations.”

“I think it is time people realized that people with Down syndrome can be sexy and beautiful and should be celebrated,” she added.

Earlier this year, actress Jamie Brewer became the first person with Down syndrome to ever walk the runway at New York Fashion Week.

According to Buzzfeed, Madeline — who is already landing modeling gigs — is currently looking for an agent.

In the meantime, the teen is winning the Interwebs. She has more than 150,000 Facebook fans so far.

“I am so happy and blessed,” Madeline wrote on Facebook Monday as her story went viral. “So happy that everyone is sharing the love,” she said in a later post.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

8 Tips for Stepmoms Experiencing Outsider Syndrome

Why do stepmoms often feel like such outsiders? Because they are.

If you’re a stepmom you know exactly what I’m talking about:

  • The kids walk into the house and ignore you
  • You answer the phone and they say “Is dad there?” – Not “Hi, how are you?”
  • You’re sitting on the couch next to your spouse, but the kids only say goodnight to him
  • Your stepchild offers to get his dad a drink while in the kitchen, completely ignoring the fact that you might be thirsty too

You’ve never been so ignored and felt so insignificant in your life. Welcome to the stepfamily.

I know from personal experience that this is often unintentional.

I have a stepmom who I love. And I didn’t realize it until I was an adult, but I never included her. I would always call out for dad, address dad, ask for dad, and not even notice that I was ignoring her. If someone would have pointed it out to me, I’m sure I would have been shocked, as shocked as I was when I realized this as an adult, and I would have made more of an effort.

I’m sure it felt awfully personal to her, but it wasn’t.

There’s also a natural tendency to reject what’s foreign. That’s why a person receiving a new organ has to be put on special medications – otherwise their body will naturally reject it.

Same principle applies in stepfamilies. Add to that an ex-spouse who badmouths you or encourages the kids to ignore you and you’ll be fighting an uphill battle for a long time.

Home is supposed to be the one place you feel safe. The one place you can relax and let the worries of the world fall away. But that can’t happen when you feel like a stranger in your own home. Ignored. Treated like a maid. Surrounded by draining, negative energy from kids you didn’t birth.

Luckily, there are some things you can do to ease that feeling of isolation.

  1. Stop feeling like a freak or thinking it’s your fault. Acknowledge that, unfortunately, it’s a normal occurrence in stepfamilies. It’s not personal. It’s not because of anything you did or didn’t do.
  2. Your husband’s support is vital. He can’t force his kids to like you, but he can demand they treat you with respect (see #3). He can also verbalize his appreciation for you and show you in little ways that you matter to him and to the family.
  3. Create some house rules around common courtesy and basic manners (hi/bye/please/thank you).
  4. If the kids already have an active mom, even if you don’t agree with her parenting, focus more on being a wife and less on trying to “mother” your stepchildren. You can still nurture and show love, but remember that they already have a mom.
  5. Let the kids set the pace of the relationship. The harder you try to get love from them, the harder they’ll resist. Let the relationships evolve naturally and remember it can take years to form a bond.
  6. Invite your friends or family over for holidays. You’ll feel like you have somebody on your team and will be more comfortable being yourself.
  7. Create a kid-free zone where you can escape from the awkwardness, decompress and recharge.
  8. Be your big, beautiful self. Don’t shrink because those around you treat you like you’re insignificant.

If you fall into the trap of behaving like an outsider because that’s how you’re feeling, you’ll only continue the cycle. Focus more on your own life and other aspects of it, enjoying your marriage and friends and focus less on the kids.

Chances are, as the years go by and you become more bonded with your stepkids, they’ll naturally start integrating you into their lives. But give it time. And remember that time in a stepfamily moves at a snail’s pace.

For help dealing with stepfamily issues, visit Jenna at www.StepmomHelp.com.
Divorce – The Huffington Post

Need to File for a Divorce!

This Little Girl With Down Syndrome And Her Baby Sister Will Totally Steal Your Heart

I’d like to introduce you to Ariana, aka “Squishy,” the sweet, sassy and seriously adorable 2-year-old that has stolen my heart.

From the moment I discovered her via her mother’s Instagram page, it was love at first sight. But it isn’t just her chubby cheeks, infectious giggle and megawatt smile that have me captivated — it’s also the fact that Squishy has Down syndrome.

I grew up with a brother who has special needs, so watching Squishy’s life unfold in a series of beautiful Instagram photos and videos really hits home for me. Although my brother doesn’t specifically have DS, there is something uniquely amazing about being in a family with someone that has developmental disabilities. My sister and I definitely attribute most of our kindness and awesomeness to being raised with our brother. Which is also why I love that Squishy’s best friend and sidekick is her 10-month-old sister, Keira, aka “Kiki.”

The dynamic duo has the best adventures together, which are all captured by their mother, Andrea Hinton. The 30-year-old stay-at-home mom is on a mission to show that her two seemingly different daughters are actually very similar in many ways.

So, in celebration of World Down Syndrome Day on Saturday, we chatted with Hinton about Squishy, Kiki, parenting two exceptional little girls and what people should know (and love) about children with DS. Check it out below …

What’s the story behind Ariana’s nickname, “Squishy”?
We received a prenatal diagnosis with Squishy and one day I was balling my eyes out when “Finding Nemo” came on. There’s a part of the movie when Dory comes across this tiny, innocent jellyfish and says, “I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine.” Right at that moment Ariana kicked me, and I felt like she was telling me, “It’s OK, Mommy. It’s all going to be OK — I shall be yours.” I started to enjoy my pregnancy again and I nicknamed her Squishy. And when she was born she was perfectly squishy! So it stuck.

A photo posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

Squishy has such a big personality! Give us three words that best describe her.

Intuitive: Squishy is always in touch with how others are feeling and sensitive to their emotions. Independent: She wants to do everything by herself, which is a good and bad thing — good because she wants to learn everything, but bad when we are in a hurry. Lovable: There are no hugs in the world that can compare to a Squishy hug!

A video posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

When did you learn that Ariana had DS? How did you and your husband feel about and deal with the news?

We learned that Ariana had DS when I was 26 weeks pregnant. I went in for an ultrasound where they thought they noticed something on her stomach so they sent me to a specialist. At that time the specialist said that there was nothing wrong with her stomach, but that they did notice something with her heart. We then went to see a pediatric cardiologist at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, California, who gave us her diagnosis, which was DS and atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD), a congenital heart defect. I was informed at that time that Ariana would have to undergo open-heart surgery shortly after birth.

It was a very out-of-body, devastating experience. People always say, “As long as the baby is healthy” — well, what if your baby isn’t healthy? Does that make you love her any less? Absolutely not. For us, it surely made us scared, but we love her even more. Jason was in basic training for the Army at the time so I immediately sent a Red Cross message to him to give him the news. Jason didn’t even flinch while we were on the phone. His exact words were, “OK. But we are going to love her just the same — she’s our daughter and she was made from our love.” He tells me now that the hardest part for him was not the diagnosis, but that he and I were not together to support each other — to learn about everything together and love on each other. We didn’t get to see each other until Ariana was almost 1 week old. Although his words were so comforting and reassuring, I was a mess. The fact that my unborn child would have to have open-heart surgery made my heart and body ache.

I had no idea what my daughter having Down syndrome meant. What it meant for her future — for our future. I’m embarrassed to admit that at the time I had never even met anyone with DS. Would my daughter fall in love? Would she be able to have those mother-daughter talks with me like I do with my mother? Will she be happy? I had never felt so alone so I drove myself into research, blogs, YouTube, and I found so many touching and inspirational stories that made me more and more confident that Ariana would be just fine. The hardest thing for me was not Ariana, it was me. Am I a strong enough person? Will I be a good enough mom? And then I finally said stop. We planned and prayed for Ariana, and she is what I wanted, exactly as she is. I just didn’t know that at the time.

A photo posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

How is raising a child with DS different from raising a child without?

We are still learning how different it is now that we have two kiddos. With Ariana being our first child, we enjoyed and really relished every milestone. When she sat independently, took her first steps, said her first word, signed her first sign, pointed with intent, all huge accomplishments that we worked with her every day, all day, meticulously. Now that we have Kiki, we are still doing a lot of the same things, but she just starts doing things on her own without any help from us; she’s been walking since 8 months old. We realize now what people mean by “cherish babyhood,” because time goes by so fast. As far as parenting, we treat both our daughters the same, we are going to instill the same morals, values and rules. I don’t want Squishy or myself to use Down syndrome as a crutch — Down syndrome is just one aspect of my daughter, it does not define her.

A photo posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

Since your husband is in the military, does that mean he’s gone a lot of the time? If so, how do you handle taking care of the girls without him around?

Yes, Jason is currently serving in the U.S. Army. He is gone for field expeditions at least twice a year and whenever he is needed in between. So, yes, unfortunately he is gone a lot. My father is terminally ill, so when Jason is gone for a long period of time we do our best to visit my family and I am able to get a little help. Jason also works very long hours so most days it’s just me and our girls. I have learned to let the little stuff go, to be present in their world, because time does go by too fast.

A video posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

Ariana and Kiki have the sweetest relationship! I hope they always stay that close. Have you thought about how you will explain Ariana’s DS to Kiki?

We are just going to explain to her that her sister rocks a little something extra called Down syndrome, which is a condition, not an illness. A condition that may make learning and speaking come at a slower pace, but that doesn’t mean that Ariana can’t do it. Your sister will have many likes and talents like you. Just remember that when someone finds it difficult to speak or learn new things that doesn’t make their feelings any less or any different from yours. So both of you, be kind to one another, love one another, protect each other, stand up for one another; you guys are sisters by blood but friends by choice, and I pray it always stays that way.

A video posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

Were you scared to have another child after having Ariana?

Yes and no. We knew that the risk of having another child with DS was relatively small, but nevertheless still a chance. And it isn’t Down syndrome, it’s the health risks like Ariana’s heart condition that can go with the diagnosis. When I got pregnant again, I knew immediately that Kiki was in perfect health — motherly instinct. I did get the Harmony non-invasive blood test just to put our minds at ease. Not because we were worried about having another child with DS, rather because we wanted to be just as prepared for this child as we were with Squishy. We are planning on two more kids. We want Squishy to have a big family!

A photo posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

You are always so positive. Do you have any daily mantras/sayings/affirmations that help you remain at ease when times get tough?

I don’t have any affirmations, but how can you not be positive with Squishy in your life? I have no reason to feel anything but pure love and positivity with my family. I have learned that I am stronger than I ever could have imagined. I can’t be weak, I have to advocate for my daughter, make sure that I am her voice so she gets everything that she deserves. But I do have this quote that I always tell Squishy: “You must always remember you are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem and smarter than you think.”

A photo posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

You started an awesome Facebook page for Squishy. What do you think people should know about children with DS?

I really want people to know that our kiddos are so much more alike than different. My Ariana is very much a 2-year-old. She gets into everything, is curious about life, she tests her boundaries and is hungry for knowledge. People should know that if we give our kids a little bit of patience and time, they will surprise you and you’ll see that they are capable of anything, just in their own time.

A video posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

What’s the best thing about being Ariana and Kiki’s mom? And what’s the hardest thing?

The best thing about being their mom is having the pleasure of watching them grow and become their own. Ariana has come so far and has done everything that the doctors and specialists told me she wouldn’t. They told me that she would not breastfeed because of her heart condition and low muscle tone. Well, she nursed until her sissy was almost born! They told me she would take an average of two years plus to walk; she was walking at 16 months old. They said she may be non-verbal, ha! She babbles her life story every chance she gets. And Keira has been the perfect addition to our family. Wherever Squishy goes, Kiki isn’t far behind. Kiki’s personality is just starting to bloom and she is the silliest, fastest — she’s going to be our athlete — most curious baby.

The hardest thing is the mother guilt that I think all mothers have at one point or another. Did I do enough today? Did I set a good example? Did I give each one individual attention? Am I nurturing them the right way? Am I watching what I say about myself around them? It’s extremely important for me to lead by example; I treat others how I want them to treat myself and my daughters, with kindness and tolerance.

A photo posted by Andrea (@squishysmommasita) on

What hopes and dreams do you and your husband have for Squishy?

First and most importantly, we want Ariana to be happy. That is our biggest hope. We want her to find her passion and be able to follow her dreams. We are introducing her to everything and anything so she can find out what she likes. Ariana is going to start tumbling and swim lessons soon. We are also getting her into piano, dance and sports as soon as she is old enough. We just want her to have every opportunity to succeed and we want her to be confident in herself.

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This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.
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